50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO officers. He reminded chapter members that AMS cal events. In the sky show auditorium, the ceiling is Headquarters requires that the local chapter president utilized to provide an overhead view of the nighttime must be an AMS member. sky filled with stars. Slide images from the "Comets are Coming" program were superimposed on this star- Melvin Swartzberg, former pilot and engineer with The Thunderstorm Project, which was conducted near and galaxy-filled ceiling area.—Ray Waldman. Orlando, Florida, and in Ohio during 1946^17, pre- Jackson sented the program for the evening. Swartzberg, a The third regular meeting of the chapter was held Starkville resident and a chapter member, presented on Tuesday, 9 April 1997 on the campus of Missis- an overview of what The Thunderstorm Project was and its goals. He began with a discussion of the sail- sippi State University (MSU) in Starkville, Mississippi. planes that were towed under developing cumulonim- Chapter President Paul Croft conducted a short bus clouds and then allowed to ride the updrafts through business meeting, including an announcement that he the cloud to collect data on thunderstorms. He also is accepting nominations for next year's local chapter Editor9s Note: The June 1947 Bulletin con- as compared with publication. I tained the Treasurer's Report for 1946. Follow- believe the membership of the ing are the first few paragraphs of that report, Society and its value to science s o which was prepared by Ralph W. Burhoe, the would have been increased much Society's treasurer. more during the past year if $10,000 had been spent on addi- Repor t of the Treasurer for 1946 tional publication rather than on In 1946, income from dues and subscriptions fell running an expensive employ- to about 88% of 1945. This, for the most part, was ment bureau and trying to arouse commercial in- due to the loss of dues and subscriptions in the armed terest in the private practice of meteorology, which forces. At the same time, our office expenses in- were the main projects consuming about that amount of executive office budget in 1946. I be- creased to about 218% of 1945. This was due to lieve it is the main business of a scientific society the establishment of the office of executive secre- to hold meetings and to publish. Our claim for tary on full scale. This new office setup cost nearly membership and subscriptions, and, indeed, for doubled the income available for it outside of a spe- lasting value to science, depends more on what we cial gift. publish than on the type of promotion work we do. I think it desirable for the Society to have an of- fice and an executive secretary. There is, however, Because of my opposition to the expensive of- a question of proportion. Societies of limited size fice program and certain related policies, I have and funds cannot have too high an overhead, and resigned as Treasurer. One important related in such cases the work must be done free by offic- policy to which I objected was turning over of the ers and committees. In more than two years of ef- main body of the treasurer's work to the execu- tive secretary, which is counter to the principle of fort, the AMS has been unable through executive an effective duality of control of fiances between assistants and executive secretaries to raise the regu- the treasurer and the executive. lar income of the Society to a level where it can Aside from the dangers involved in the above support the expensive office it now has, or even to discussed situation with regard to the Society's ex- show that it is feasible. I therefore believe a con- ecutive office, the financial situation is in pretty tinuation of the experiment, which seems financially good order. unsound, to be unwise. I seriously question the policy of spending such Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 28, 294. a large proportion of the funds on office overhead Vol. 78,, No. 6, June 1997 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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10.1175/1520-0477-78.6.1212
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Abstract

officers. He reminded chapter members that AMS cal events. In the sky show auditorium, the ceiling is Headquarters requires that the local chapter president utilized to provide an overhead view of the nighttime must be an AMS member. sky filled with stars. Slide images from the "Comets are Coming" program were superimposed on this star- Melvin Swartzberg, former pilot and engineer with The Thunderstorm Project, which was conducted near and galaxy-filled ceiling area.—Ray Waldman. Orlando, Florida, and in Ohio during 1946^17, pre- Jackson sented the program for the evening. Swartzberg, a The third regular meeting of the chapter was held Starkville resident and a chapter member, presented on Tuesday, 9 April 1997 on the campus of Missis- an overview of what The Thunderstorm Project was and its goals. He began with a discussion of the sail- sippi State University (MSU) in Starkville, Mississippi. planes that were towed under developing cumulonim- Chapter President Paul Croft conducted a short bus clouds and then allowed to ride the updrafts through business meeting, including an announcement that he the cloud to collect data on thunderstorms. He also is accepting nominations for next year's local chapter Editor9s Note: The June 1947 Bulletin con- as compared with publication. I tained the Treasurer's Report for 1946. Follow- believe the membership of the ing are the first few paragraphs of that report, Society and its value to science s o which was prepared by Ralph W. Burhoe, the would have been increased much Society's treasurer. more during the past year if $10,000 had been spent on addi- Repor t of the Treasurer for 1946 tional publication rather than on In 1946, income from dues and subscriptions fell running an expensive employ- to about 88% of 1945. This, for the most part, was ment bureau and trying to arouse commercial in- due to the loss of dues and subscriptions in the armed terest in the private practice of meteorology, which forces. At the same time, our office expenses in- were the main projects consuming about that amount of executive office budget in 1946. I be- creased to about 218% of 1945. This was due to lieve it is the main business of a scientific society the establishment of the office of executive secre- to hold meetings and to publish. Our claim for tary on full scale. This new office setup cost nearly membership and subscriptions, and, indeed, for doubled the income available for it outside of a spe- lasting value to science, depends more on what we cial gift. publish than on the type of promotion work we do. I think it desirable for the Society to have an of- fice and an executive secretary. There is, however, Because of my opposition to the expensive of- a question of proportion. Societies of limited size fice program and certain related policies, I have and funds cannot have too high an overhead, and resigned as Treasurer. One important related in such cases the work must be done free by offic- policy to which I objected was turning over of the ers and committees. In more than two years of ef- main body of the treasurer's work to the execu- tive secretary, which is counter to the principle of fort, the AMS has been unable through executive an effective duality of control of fiances between assistants and executive secretaries to raise the regu- the treasurer and the executive. lar income of the Society to a level where it can Aside from the dangers involved in the above support the expensive office it now has, or even to discussed situation with regard to the Society's ex- show that it is feasible. I therefore believe a con- ecutive office, the financial situation is in pretty tinuation of the experiment, which seems financially good order. unsound, to be unwise. I seriously question the policy of spending such Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 28, 294. a large proportion of the funds on office overhead Vol. 78,, No. 6, June 1997

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jun 1, 1997

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