50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO Brad Colman, the science operation officer. At a meet- dealt with the changes that will occur as NWSFO Chi- ing on 14 November, a panel discussion on the cago progresses in the modernization program toward weather outlook for winter took place. Panel members a full AWIPS (Advanced Weather Interactive Process- include d Nick Bond, a research scientist with ing System) operation. NOAA' s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Labas described the organizational structure of the and Doug McDonald, the service hydrologist at new offices and used slides to show the location and NWSFO Seattle.—Larry Kierulff. geographical boundaries of the new offices. He fo- cused on the Chicago Forecast Office and those new Chicago offices whose areas of responsibility are adjacent to it. One of the major changes he said was the change The 5 March 1996 meeting was held at the Harold from the NWS one-state-responsibility concept to that E. White Center on the campus Lewis University, of serving a smaller geographical area. He added that Romeoville, Illinois. Chapter President Tom Piazza called for the secretary, treasurer, and committee re- this would enable forecasters to issue more timely ports and then introduced Paul Swope, the chairman warnings and allow for increased emphasis on the of the nominating committee. Swope presented the mesoscale analysis of weather systems affecting their slate of officers for the 1996-97 year, who were Evert areas. He further pointed out that in most cases the protection of the public in the areas served by the new A. Schmidt, president; Robert J. Hajek, vice president; offices would be enhanced through the installation of Willia m J. Johnson, secretary; and Raymond R. a new NEXRAD radar system. Waldman, treasurer. Another point discussed by Labas was the dramatic Speakers for the evening were from NWSFO Chi- increase in availability of data to forecasters in new cago. They were Ken Labas, science operations of- offices from a variety of new sources. He mentioned ficer; Jim Allsopp, warning coordination meteorolo- that some offices, Chicago being one, have the advan- gist; and Bill Morris, hydrologist. Each presentation Wha t Woul d an Atomic Bomb ditions in New Mexico were affected by the initial D o to a Hurricane? bomb test. If you dropped an atomic bomb on an area In August 1945, Mayor Herbert A. every 15 minutes for several days, you's probably create a change in atmospheric conditions. But if you Frink of hurricane-conscious Miami did this in the heart of a hurricane the effect might be Beach suggested to President Truman to intensify the storm, rather than cause it to disrupt. that an atomic bomb be used against We just don't know." a hurricane to determine whether the new weapon is effective against Dr. William J. Humphreys, now in retirement af- nature's fury. ter years of service with the Weather bureau, said an estimate once was made by a Japanese scientist that A reporter asked two Weather Bureau men what a hurricane 500 miles in diameter releases latent heat effect, if any, an A-bomb would have on the hurri- energy at a rate equivalent to 12 000 000 000 000 (tril- cane then raging over Texas. lion) horsepower—and maintains that for as much as "An atomic bomb explosion would just be a drop 10 days. "In my opinion the atomic bombs we now in the bucket in a hurricane of the scope of the one have wouldn't affect a hurricane one way or the other. now hitting Texas," said I. R. Tannehill, chief of the If an enormous bomb were constructed to have power division of forecasts of the U.S. Weather Bureau and equal to that of the overall power of a hurricane, it author of a book on hurricanes. "The Texas storm is might well be that the bomb would make the hurri- about 200 miles in diameter, sufficient to cover a state cane worse, instead of breaking it up."—A. P., Aug. of the size of Ohio at one time. Based on the evidence 27, 1945. we have from Hiroshima, you can see that an atomic bomb dropped on Ohio would affect only a limited area—very limited in comparison with the area of a hurricane." "There is no evidence that weather con- Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 27, 209. 102 7 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

Brad Colman, the science operation officer. At a meet- dealt with the changes that will occur as NWSFO Chi- ing on 14 November, a panel discussion on the cago progresses in the modernization program toward weather outlook for winter took place. Panel members a full AWIPS (Advanced Weather Interactive Process- include d Nick Bond, a research scientist with ing System) operation. NOAA' s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Labas described the organizational structure of the and Doug McDonald, the service hydrologist at new offices and used slides to show the location and NWSFO Seattle.—Larry Kierulff. geographical boundaries of the new offices. He fo- cused on the Chicago Forecast Office and those new Chicago offices whose areas of responsibility are adjacent to it. One of the major changes he said was the change The 5 March 1996 meeting was held at the Harold from the NWS one-state-responsibility concept to that E. White Center on the campus Lewis University, of serving a smaller geographical area. He added that Romeoville, Illinois. Chapter President Tom Piazza called for the secretary, treasurer, and committee re- this would enable forecasters to issue more timely ports and then introduced Paul Swope, the chairman warnings and allow for increased emphasis on the of the nominating committee. Swope presented the mesoscale analysis of weather systems affecting their slate of officers for the 1996-97 year, who were Evert areas. He further pointed out that in most cases the protection of the public in the areas served by the new A. Schmidt, president; Robert J. Hajek, vice president; offices would be enhanced through the installation of Willia m J. Johnson, secretary; and Raymond R. a new NEXRAD radar system. Waldman, treasurer. Another point discussed by Labas was the dramatic Speakers for the evening were from NWSFO Chi- increase in availability of data to forecasters in new cago. They were Ken Labas, science operations of- offices from a variety of new sources. He mentioned ficer; Jim Allsopp, warning coordination meteorolo- that some offices, Chicago being one, have the advan- gist; and Bill Morris, hydrologist. Each presentation Wha t Woul d an Atomic Bomb ditions in New Mexico were affected by the initial D o to a Hurricane? bomb test. If you dropped an atomic bomb on an area In August 1945, Mayor Herbert A. every 15 minutes for several days, you's probably create a change in atmospheric conditions. But if you Frink of hurricane-conscious Miami did this in the heart of a hurricane the effect might be Beach suggested to President Truman to intensify the storm, rather than cause it to disrupt. that an atomic bomb be used against We just don't know." a hurricane to determine whether the new weapon is effective against Dr. William J. Humphreys, now in retirement af- nature's fury. ter years of service with the Weather bureau, said an estimate once was made by a Japanese scientist that A reporter asked two Weather Bureau men what a hurricane 500 miles in diameter releases latent heat effect, if any, an A-bomb would have on the hurri- energy at a rate equivalent to 12 000 000 000 000 (tril- cane then raging over Texas. lion) horsepower—and maintains that for as much as "An atomic bomb explosion would just be a drop 10 days. "In my opinion the atomic bombs we now in the bucket in a hurricane of the scope of the one have wouldn't affect a hurricane one way or the other. now hitting Texas," said I. R. Tannehill, chief of the If an enormous bomb were constructed to have power division of forecasts of the U.S. Weather Bureau and equal to that of the overall power of a hurricane, it author of a book on hurricanes. "The Texas storm is might well be that the bomb would make the hurri- about 200 miles in diameter, sufficient to cover a state cane worse, instead of breaking it up."—A. P., Aug. of the size of Ohio at one time. Based on the evidence 27, 1945. we have from Hiroshima, you can see that an atomic bomb dropped on Ohio would affect only a limited area—very limited in comparison with the area of a hurricane." "There is no evidence that weather con- Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 27, 209. 102 7 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: May 1, 1996

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