50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO District o f Columbia ography of the navy are six oceanographic research/ survey vessels, which measure sea surface tempera- The 9 September 1997 meeting was held at the ture, two coastal hydrographic ships, which handle NOAA complex in Silver Spring, Maryland. Chapter sonar measurements, and an oceanographic library. Chairperson Ward Seguin started off the business por- The airfield in naval meteorology and oceanogra- tion of the meeting by introducing the new chapter of- phy is constantly moving, which makes forecasting ficers: himself as chairperson, Vickie Nadolski as the quite challenging. A newer science, arctic oceanogra- vice chairperson, Libby Haynes as treasurer, Jack phy, studies submarines under snow and ice. Another Settelmaier as corresponding secretary, Lauraleen hot topic in the news lately is El Nino and the study O'Conno r as recording secretary, and Sheryl of its effects on climate. Slides were shown depicting McCarthy as representative at large. McCarthy asked various problems that the METOCs face, such as the members to contact her if they would like to be judges plunging, spilling, or breaking waves when an am- at the 1998 elementary, middle, and high school sci- phibious ship slides onto a beach; high seas and the ence fairs. Nadolski asked members to pass along any effect on SEAL operations; refueling in the sea; and ideas they might have for topics or speakers at upcom- Marine Corps jump jets that land like a helicopter. ing chapter meetings. She also introduced a special visitor for the evening, National Weather Association A typical aircraft carrier (12 in service) will have a Executive Director Kevin Lavin. Seguin finished off METOC officer and 12-15 enlisted people. Each of the business meeting by stating that his goal for this the five FHAs and five LHDs (all amphibious vessels) year is to widen the scope of chapter activities and will have a METOC aboard depending on the mission. membership participation. He said that only about One major challenge for each METOC officer is 10% of the membership attends the meetings, roughly that the forecast they have made to the captain may 30 out of 300. He announced that he hopes the chap- change drastically by the next morning as the ship has ter will become more involved in school career days, gone in a different direction or port than first told to school visitation, and contacting weather-related in- the METOC officer. Another challenge is a better com- dustries to contribute to the newsletter. He is also look- munications system from ship to ship.—Susan A. ing for members to help spruce up the chapter's Web Tarbell. N.A.C.A . Standar d Atmosphere Extende d t o 400,00 0 Feet The best available information on the outer reaches of the earth's air envelope to 120 Km, from results of research in many branches of science, was compiled by a special group established by the N.A.C.A. in April 1946 to extend the known standards to the heights now being considered for future aircraft and rocket operation. The committee, headed by Dr. Harry Wexler of the U.S. Weather Bureau, includes representatives from the Army, Navy, universities and other government agencies. Establishment of a "stan- dard atmosphere" is a necessary prerequisite to the development of new aircraft and guided missile designed for upper-atmosphere travel. The previous N.A.C.A. standard atmosphere was officially adopted in 1925 but included only the range from sea level to 65,000 ft. The new tentative tables just published* are intended to extend the standard from 65,000 to 400,000 ft (76 miles). They are based on combined results of direct observation by radiosonde balloons, and on calcu- lations based on known temperature changes, astronomical observations, and other indirect means. Such calculations are, incidentally, not in great disagreement with some of the recent V-2 observations though further studies will undoubtedly require revisions of these tentative tables, which show temperature, den- sity, pressure, speed of sound and other aerodynamic properties. *N.A.C.A. Technical Report 1200, Feb. 2, 1947, Mimeogr. Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc., 28,424. 2540 Vol. 78, No. 7 7, November 1997 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

50 YEARS AGO

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Abstract

District o f Columbia ography of the navy are six oceanographic research/ survey vessels, which measure sea surface tempera- The 9 September 1997 meeting was held at the ture, two coastal hydrographic ships, which handle NOAA complex in Silver Spring, Maryland. Chapter sonar measurements, and an oceanographic library. Chairperson Ward Seguin started off the business por- The airfield in naval meteorology and oceanogra- tion of the meeting by introducing the new chapter of- phy is constantly moving, which makes forecasting ficers: himself as chairperson, Vickie Nadolski as the quite challenging. A newer science, arctic oceanogra- vice chairperson, Libby Haynes as treasurer, Jack phy, studies submarines under snow and ice. Another Settelmaier as corresponding secretary, Lauraleen hot topic in the news lately is El Nino and the study O'Conno r as recording secretary, and Sheryl of its effects on climate. Slides were shown depicting McCarthy as representative at large. McCarthy asked various problems that the METOCs face, such as the members to contact her if they would like to be judges plunging, spilling, or breaking waves when an am- at the 1998 elementary, middle, and high school sci- phibious ship slides onto a beach; high seas and the ence fairs. Nadolski asked members to pass along any effect on SEAL operations; refueling in the sea; and ideas they might have for topics or speakers at upcom- Marine Corps jump jets that land like a helicopter. ing chapter meetings. She also introduced a special visitor for the evening, National Weather Association A typical aircraft carrier (12 in service) will have a Executive Director Kevin Lavin. Seguin finished off METOC officer and 12-15 enlisted people. Each of the business meeting by stating that his goal for this the five FHAs and five LHDs (all amphibious vessels) year is to widen the scope of chapter activities and will have a METOC aboard depending on the mission. membership participation. He said that only about One major challenge for each METOC officer is 10% of the membership attends the meetings, roughly that the forecast they have made to the captain may 30 out of 300. He announced that he hopes the chap- change drastically by the next morning as the ship has ter will become more involved in school career days, gone in a different direction or port than first told to school visitation, and contacting weather-related in- the METOC officer. Another challenge is a better com- dustries to contribute to the newsletter. He is also look- munications system from ship to ship.—Susan A. ing for members to help spruce up the chapter's Web Tarbell. N.A.C.A . Standar d Atmosphere Extende d t o 400,00 0 Feet The best available information on the outer reaches of the earth's air envelope to 120 Km, from results of research in many branches of science, was compiled by a special group established by the N.A.C.A. in April 1946 to extend the known standards to the heights now being considered for future aircraft and rocket operation. The committee, headed by Dr. Harry Wexler of the U.S. Weather Bureau, includes representatives from the Army, Navy, universities and other government agencies. Establishment of a "stan- dard atmosphere" is a necessary prerequisite to the development of new aircraft and guided missile designed for upper-atmosphere travel. The previous N.A.C.A. standard atmosphere was officially adopted in 1925 but included only the range from sea level to 65,000 ft. The new tentative tables just published* are intended to extend the standard from 65,000 to 400,000 ft (76 miles). They are based on combined results of direct observation by radiosonde balloons, and on calcu- lations based on known temperature changes, astronomical observations, and other indirect means. Such calculations are, incidentally, not in great disagreement with some of the recent V-2 observations though further studies will undoubtedly require revisions of these tentative tables, which show temperature, den- sity, pressure, speed of sound and other aerodynamic properties. *N.A.C.A. Technical Report 1200, Feb. 2, 1947, Mimeogr. Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc., 28,424. 2540 Vol. 78, No. 7 7, November 1997

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Nov 1, 1997

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