50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO Pederson welcomed new people and guests. Chap- tures are El Nino (warm sea surface temperatures) and ter Recording Secretary Juan Yee-Fong then read the La Nina (cold sea surface temperatures). He said that October 2000 meeting minutes, which were approved. this year there appears to be no Pacific equatorial re- Chapter Treasurer Travis Steen then presented the sta- gion temperature anomalies. There is also the South- tus of the chapter account. Six people joined the chap- ern Oscillation, which involves subtracting the ter. Pederson announced that two people have temperature between Darwin, Australia, and Tahiti. volunteered to serve on the chapter's education com- This temperature difference is combined with the sea mittee. John Campbell has been selected to receive the surface temperature anomaly to form ENSO. The nor- chapter scholarship. An abstract of Omaha-Offutt mal circulation is called the Walker Circulation, which chapter activities has been sent to the AMS for the annual meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A poster was also being put together, and Pederson asked for help with the poster. Th e Spartan School o f Aeronautics Pederson then moved on to new business by an- nouncing forecast contest results. For the October con- test, Pete Roohr took first place, Michael Riedy took second place, and Paul Demmert took third place. For the November contest, the winner was Cal Naegelin, That a good weather forecaster can be trained Mark Conner was the runner-up, and Pete Roohr came in one year is still news to most people. The one in third. year course offered by the School of Meteorol- Chapter Vice President Ken Dewey mentioned ogy at Spartan School of Aeronautics (Tulsa, there were AMS T-shirts for sale. Okla.) is the only one of its kind in the world, It was then announced there would not be a Decem- as far as we know. It has graduated several hun- ber 2000 meeting. The next meeting was scheduled for dreds of good weather men— 25 January 2001, with the topic and guest speaker to and some women too! Many of be determined. Future planned events and topics in- thes e are now with private clud e a 15 February 2001 Career Fair, "storm companies, airlines or the U. S. chasing" at the March 2001 meeting, and "responding Weathe r Bureau. There are to severe weather messages" at the April 2001 meet- graduates with the Bureau in ing. The May 2001 meeting will include chapter mem- Alaska, the Atlantic and Pa- bers as guest speakers and the election of new chapter cific Weather Patrol, the U.S. officers. Weather Bureau Analysis Cen- Pederson introduced the guest speaker, Steve Byrd, ter in Washington and in numerous stations all science and technology officer for the past seven years over the country. Many of the airlines also are at the NWS forecast office located at Valley, Nebraska. employing these graduates today with apparent He spent four years in the U.S. Air Force and began satisfaction. Many Spartan graduates are with his career as a forecaster with the NWS in 1974. His the Air Force as enlisted forecasters and observ- area of expertise is extended forecasting. His topic was ers. Some are Weather Officers. an overhead slide presentation of "The Winter Forecast." The Spartan course does not pretend to equal Starting in December (according to the Farmer's or rival a complete college course with its Sci- Almanac), he said Nebraska would be warm and rela- ence Degree. It does fill the need for a course to tively dry: 8°F above normal and 1 inch less snowfall prepare for the sub-professional classifications than normal. Byrd then introduced another useful fore- in the Weather Bureau where many have done cast tool—the wooly bear caterpillar. The absence of well and are doing well today. exterior bands or rings indicates a bad winter. The cat- The course was first offered in 1938, and has erpillar Byrd had with him had no bands or rings, so been in continuous operation since then. that indicated to Byrd that the temperature is going to be colder than normal. Byrd then moved on to more Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc32, 108. serious and scientific forecasting tools. He focused mainly on temperature anomalies in Pacific equatorial regions. Two well-known tempera- 46 7 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

Pederson welcomed new people and guests. Chap- tures are El Nino (warm sea surface temperatures) and ter Recording Secretary Juan Yee-Fong then read the La Nina (cold sea surface temperatures). He said that October 2000 meeting minutes, which were approved. this year there appears to be no Pacific equatorial re- Chapter Treasurer Travis Steen then presented the sta- gion temperature anomalies. There is also the South- tus of the chapter account. Six people joined the chap- ern Oscillation, which involves subtracting the ter. Pederson announced that two people have temperature between Darwin, Australia, and Tahiti. volunteered to serve on the chapter's education com- This temperature difference is combined with the sea mittee. John Campbell has been selected to receive the surface temperature anomaly to form ENSO. The nor- chapter scholarship. An abstract of Omaha-Offutt mal circulation is called the Walker Circulation, which chapter activities has been sent to the AMS for the annual meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A poster was also being put together, and Pederson asked for help with the poster. Th e Spartan School o f Aeronautics Pederson then moved on to new business by an- nouncing forecast contest results. For the October con- test, Pete Roohr took first place, Michael Riedy took second place, and Paul Demmert took third place. For the November contest, the winner was Cal Naegelin, That a good weather forecaster can be trained Mark Conner was the runner-up, and Pete Roohr came in one year is still news to most people. The one in third. year course offered by the School of Meteorol- Chapter Vice President Ken Dewey mentioned ogy at Spartan School of Aeronautics (Tulsa, there were AMS T-shirts for sale. Okla.) is the only one of its kind in the world, It was then announced there would not be a Decem- as far as we know. It has graduated several hun- ber 2000 meeting. The next meeting was scheduled for dreds of good weather men— 25 January 2001, with the topic and guest speaker to and some women too! Many of be determined. Future planned events and topics in- thes e are now with private clud e a 15 February 2001 Career Fair, "storm companies, airlines or the U. S. chasing" at the March 2001 meeting, and "responding Weathe r Bureau. There are to severe weather messages" at the April 2001 meet- graduates with the Bureau in ing. The May 2001 meeting will include chapter mem- Alaska, the Atlantic and Pa- bers as guest speakers and the election of new chapter cific Weather Patrol, the U.S. officers. Weather Bureau Analysis Cen- Pederson introduced the guest speaker, Steve Byrd, ter in Washington and in numerous stations all science and technology officer for the past seven years over the country. Many of the airlines also are at the NWS forecast office located at Valley, Nebraska. employing these graduates today with apparent He spent four years in the U.S. Air Force and began satisfaction. Many Spartan graduates are with his career as a forecaster with the NWS in 1974. His the Air Force as enlisted forecasters and observ- area of expertise is extended forecasting. His topic was ers. Some are Weather Officers. an overhead slide presentation of "The Winter Forecast." The Spartan course does not pretend to equal Starting in December (according to the Farmer's or rival a complete college course with its Sci- Almanac), he said Nebraska would be warm and rela- ence Degree. It does fill the need for a course to tively dry: 8°F above normal and 1 inch less snowfall prepare for the sub-professional classifications than normal. Byrd then introduced another useful fore- in the Weather Bureau where many have done cast tool—the wooly bear caterpillar. The absence of well and are doing well today. exterior bands or rings indicates a bad winter. The cat- The course was first offered in 1938, and has erpillar Byrd had with him had no bands or rings, so been in continuous operation since then. that indicated to Byrd that the temperature is going to be colder than normal. Byrd then moved on to more Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc32, 108. serious and scientific forecasting tools. He focused mainly on temperature anomalies in Pacific equatorial regions. Two well-known tempera- 46 7 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 2001

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