50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO The 21 January 1999 speaker will be Frances able to observe the cloud modeling section of their Sherertz, the Federal Aviation Administration's operations. Interesting satellite images were displayed Deputy Director of Weather Requirements (ARW-2). to the group as well. Among other stops on the tour, The topic of her talk will be "Meteorology in Aircraft there were demonstrations of the MM5/AFWIN capa- Accident Investigations."—Lauraleen O'Connor. bilities at the base and a tour of the production floor of the Air Force Weather News Service. Iow a State University After the tour, the group was invited to join the The 20 October 1998 meeting featured a trip to Omaha-Offutt AMS chapter for dinner. After the so- Offutt Air Force Base near Omaha, Nebraska. Major cial hour, a presentation on AMS Datastreme was pre- Ken Carey conducted the tour. Students learned about sented, concerning how area teachers are learning the operations at Offutt, including the local forecast- about weather concepts. ing operations at the base. In addition, students were The chapter met again on 3 November 1998. The The Weatherman Eyes Television Editor's Note: The following contains excerpts of an article that appeared in the January 1949 Bulletin. The article was too long to reproduce in its entirety. A new field of endeavor is beckoning the meteorologist. Television is a "natu- ral" for the weatherman. He can for the first time demonstrate to the public at large KfgS I the how's and why's of the weather, as well as describe how a weather forecast is prepared. The Weather Bureau is interested in television too, and is cooperating with pri- vate meteorologists who present weather telecasts. Such television weather pro- grams are already in existence in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Washington. Plans are underway for similar telecasts in Buffalo and Cleveland. At the present stage of development, television and weather broadcasts seem to fall into two schools of philosophy; (1) the more formalized informational program, and (2) the friendly, chatty presentation that discusses the weather in an entertaining manner. The philosophy behind the more formalized presentation has already been indicated by James Fidler of the Weather Bureau in an earlier issue of the Bulletin (Vol. 29, No. 6, June 1948, p. 329). The Department of Agriculture, however, recently published in its Radio Farm Digest an article about a television weather broadcast, and it sums up quite well the philosophy behind the "chatty" type of program. It is quoted in part below: "If any phase of the farm radio should be destined to continue its rather conventional course into the era of TV, it might seem to be the weather forecast, with 'Fair tonight and Saturday, with pos- sibly rain and lower temperatures Sunday.' And perhaps it will. But, any prospective farm weather broadcaster who is willing to approach TV with his preconceived ideas set to zero, might cast a glance at a 5-minute, 5-night-a-week forecast evolved during recent months over NBC's WNBW here in Washington.. " [... ] Television is a challenge to the weatherman who is anxious to serve a discriminating pub- lic. The profession is watching the development with great interest. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 30, 33-35. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 123 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-80.1.123
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Abstract

The 21 January 1999 speaker will be Frances able to observe the cloud modeling section of their Sherertz, the Federal Aviation Administration's operations. Interesting satellite images were displayed Deputy Director of Weather Requirements (ARW-2). to the group as well. Among other stops on the tour, The topic of her talk will be "Meteorology in Aircraft there were demonstrations of the MM5/AFWIN capa- Accident Investigations."—Lauraleen O'Connor. bilities at the base and a tour of the production floor of the Air Force Weather News Service. Iow a State University After the tour, the group was invited to join the The 20 October 1998 meeting featured a trip to Omaha-Offutt AMS chapter for dinner. After the so- Offutt Air Force Base near Omaha, Nebraska. Major cial hour, a presentation on AMS Datastreme was pre- Ken Carey conducted the tour. Students learned about sented, concerning how area teachers are learning the operations at Offutt, including the local forecast- about weather concepts. ing operations at the base. In addition, students were The chapter met again on 3 November 1998. The The Weatherman Eyes Television Editor's Note: The following contains excerpts of an article that appeared in the January 1949 Bulletin. The article was too long to reproduce in its entirety. A new field of endeavor is beckoning the meteorologist. Television is a "natu- ral" for the weatherman. He can for the first time demonstrate to the public at large KfgS I the how's and why's of the weather, as well as describe how a weather forecast is prepared. The Weather Bureau is interested in television too, and is cooperating with pri- vate meteorologists who present weather telecasts. Such television weather pro- grams are already in existence in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Washington. Plans are underway for similar telecasts in Buffalo and Cleveland. At the present stage of development, television and weather broadcasts seem to fall into two schools of philosophy; (1) the more formalized informational program, and (2) the friendly, chatty presentation that discusses the weather in an entertaining manner. The philosophy behind the more formalized presentation has already been indicated by James Fidler of the Weather Bureau in an earlier issue of the Bulletin (Vol. 29, No. 6, June 1948, p. 329). The Department of Agriculture, however, recently published in its Radio Farm Digest an article about a television weather broadcast, and it sums up quite well the philosophy behind the "chatty" type of program. It is quoted in part below: "If any phase of the farm radio should be destined to continue its rather conventional course into the era of TV, it might seem to be the weather forecast, with 'Fair tonight and Saturday, with pos- sibly rain and lower temperatures Sunday.' And perhaps it will. But, any prospective farm weather broadcaster who is willing to approach TV with his preconceived ideas set to zero, might cast a glance at a 5-minute, 5-night-a-week forecast evolved during recent months over NBC's WNBW here in Washington.. " [... ] Television is a challenge to the weatherman who is anxious to serve a discriminating pub- lic. The profession is watching the development with great interest. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 30, 33-35. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 123

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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