50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO period of 2 to 20 February 2000 at Montgomery Carey started the Career Night activities by intro- Alabama. ducing the evening's panelists to the audience and pro- The winner for the month was Major Ed Bensman vided a brief biographical sketch of each individual: with 174 points, second place went to Major Ken Carey with the 172 points, and in third place was Cathy 1) Mark Lee from KMTV-Omaha; Zapotocny with 170 points. For the season, the leader 2) Cathy Zapotocny from the NWS; is Will Adler with 216 points, second place is Joe 3) TSgt. Dana Becker, assistant chief, Continental U.S. Hanser with 186 points, third place is Peter Roohr with Severe Weather Forecast Operations, HQ AFWA; 182 points, and very close behind in fourth is Carolyn 4) Capt. Travis Steen, chief, Air Force Weather Ra- Petri with 180 points. dar Training, HQ AFWA; Phil Johnson gave an update on Education Commit- 5) Mark Anderson, associate professor, University of tee activities. Volunteers are still needed to judge sci- Nebraska at Lincoln, Department of Geosciences; ence fairs, especially for the Metro Omaha Science and 6) Jerry Wegiel, senior scientist, Fine Scale Model- Engineering Fair and the Iowa State Science and Tech- ing Team, HQ AFWA; nology Fair. 7) Art Douglas, associate professor, Creighton Uni- SAIC has provided $400 for the chapter scholarship versity, Department of Atmospheric Sciences; fund. In addition, DTN/Kavouras Weather Services has 8) Marty McKewon, Storm Sentry Product Manager, donated $100. Applications for the scholarship are on the DTN/Kavouras Weather Services; and Web site or available from Johnson. Copies were also 9) Jim Krist, Omaha Public Power District (OPPD), made available to attendees at the Career Night. Environment and Government Affairs Division. Snow and Hoarfrost in Egypt The most interesting phenomenon which happened for the first time in the vi- einity of Cairo, occurred on the morning of February 6. Observers and several people saw snow or snow grains (frozen drizzle) falling for 2 or 3 minutes at Maadi at 7h.25, Maassara at 7h.35, and Helwan at 7h.40, local time. These small towns are located a few miles SSE of Cairo along the railroad between the Nile and the Mokattam Hills. Unfortunately, nobody reported the type of clouds. Usually, when snow falls in the Middle East it is from nimbostratus clouds. On that Monday morning it seems that the snow (which indeed was light) or snow grains, fell from stratocumulus clouds, formed in modified European continental air. I watched the sky between 7h.30 and 7h.40, while a few thin drops of rain were falling in Cairo. There were only about 4/10 of stratocumulus bases estimated at 3000 ft, tops estimated at 5000 ft, coming from a direction of 330°. It is the first time I ever saw stratocumulus formed in a proportion of about 3/4 of ice crystals and 1/4 of supercooled drops. The clouds which were about 6/10 coverage at 7h and formed of supercooled droplets, decreased to 1/ 10 coverage at 8h, and by that time they were completely frozen into ice crystals resembling cirrus, but having a grey-bluish colour. Although I have specialized in cloud photography for many years, I did not take pictures of these clouds because the sky was hazy and the cloud contours too dif- fuse.—Albert Simon, 13 Bustan St., Cairo, February 15. Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc31, 193. 1378 Vol. 81 No. 6 June 2000 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

period of 2 to 20 February 2000 at Montgomery Carey started the Career Night activities by intro- Alabama. ducing the evening's panelists to the audience and pro- The winner for the month was Major Ed Bensman vided a brief biographical sketch of each individual: with 174 points, second place went to Major Ken Carey with the 172 points, and in third place was Cathy 1) Mark Lee from KMTV-Omaha; Zapotocny with 170 points. For the season, the leader 2) Cathy Zapotocny from the NWS; is Will Adler with 216 points, second place is Joe 3) TSgt. Dana Becker, assistant chief, Continental U.S. Hanser with 186 points, third place is Peter Roohr with Severe Weather Forecast Operations, HQ AFWA; 182 points, and very close behind in fourth is Carolyn 4) Capt. Travis Steen, chief, Air Force Weather Ra- Petri with 180 points. dar Training, HQ AFWA; Phil Johnson gave an update on Education Commit- 5) Mark Anderson, associate professor, University of tee activities. Volunteers are still needed to judge sci- Nebraska at Lincoln, Department of Geosciences; ence fairs, especially for the Metro Omaha Science and 6) Jerry Wegiel, senior scientist, Fine Scale Model- Engineering Fair and the Iowa State Science and Tech- ing Team, HQ AFWA; nology Fair. 7) Art Douglas, associate professor, Creighton Uni- SAIC has provided $400 for the chapter scholarship versity, Department of Atmospheric Sciences; fund. In addition, DTN/Kavouras Weather Services has 8) Marty McKewon, Storm Sentry Product Manager, donated $100. Applications for the scholarship are on the DTN/Kavouras Weather Services; and Web site or available from Johnson. Copies were also 9) Jim Krist, Omaha Public Power District (OPPD), made available to attendees at the Career Night. Environment and Government Affairs Division. Snow and Hoarfrost in Egypt The most interesting phenomenon which happened for the first time in the vi- einity of Cairo, occurred on the morning of February 6. Observers and several people saw snow or snow grains (frozen drizzle) falling for 2 or 3 minutes at Maadi at 7h.25, Maassara at 7h.35, and Helwan at 7h.40, local time. These small towns are located a few miles SSE of Cairo along the railroad between the Nile and the Mokattam Hills. Unfortunately, nobody reported the type of clouds. Usually, when snow falls in the Middle East it is from nimbostratus clouds. On that Monday morning it seems that the snow (which indeed was light) or snow grains, fell from stratocumulus clouds, formed in modified European continental air. I watched the sky between 7h.30 and 7h.40, while a few thin drops of rain were falling in Cairo. There were only about 4/10 of stratocumulus bases estimated at 3000 ft, tops estimated at 5000 ft, coming from a direction of 330°. It is the first time I ever saw stratocumulus formed in a proportion of about 3/4 of ice crystals and 1/4 of supercooled drops. The clouds which were about 6/10 coverage at 7h and formed of supercooled droplets, decreased to 1/ 10 coverage at 8h, and by that time they were completely frozen into ice crystals resembling cirrus, but having a grey-bluish colour. Although I have specialized in cloud photography for many years, I did not take pictures of these clouds because the sky was hazy and the cloud contours too dif- fuse.—Albert Simon, 13 Bustan St., Cairo, February 15. Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc31, 193. 1378 Vol. 81 No. 6 June 2000

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jun 1, 2000

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