50 years ago

50 years ago was an enthusiastic booster of athletics at UCLA, and 25 years ago several generations of football players may remember his Introductory Physics 10 lectures. It is doubtful that he ever failed a goo d athlete wh o wa s also an attentive Sovie t Weather Satellite. The first Soviet weather student, and in an interview with the Los Angeles satellite, Cosmos-122, was launched on 25 June Times he is quoted as saying, "I see no difference in 1966. The satellite was placed in a circular orbit at a boy preparing to become a football or basketball an altitude of 625 km and inclimation of 65 degrees. player or a boy learning to be a violinist, a social Judging from a report by I. P. Vetlov published in worker, or a surgeon"; and his advice to a UCLA the WM O Bulletin of October 1966, Cosmos-122 is defensive halfback was, "Never collide with anyone. quite similar to the ESSA satellites and gathers the Just intercept those passes and run out of bounds. same data. Some excellent cloud cover pictures That's elementary physics." were included in the article. Kaplan's first wife, Katherine, died several years ago. He is survived by his second wife, Frances, who Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 48, 35. lives in Los Angeles.— Willia m Kellogg. William W. Kellogg is a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and one of Joe Kaplan's former graduate students. Opportunit y for Wome n in Meteorological Work. Although there has been much prejudice against and few precedents for employing women generally for professional work in meteorology, perhaps a dozen Mauric e A. Garbell women have obtained meteorological positions in the 1914-1990 last few years, mostly outside the government ser- vice. However, since there is at present an acute Dr. Maurice A. Garbell passed shortage of both trained meteorologists and men for away on 24 February 1990 at Pa- observers and clerical positions in the Weather Bu- cific Presbyterian Hospital after a reau and other government agencies, airlines, etc., short illness. He was 75. women with th e proper qualification (same as for men) Garbell, an internationally rec- are now being welcome in many places where they ognized expert in flight safety and airport design, were not encouraged even last year. (In England aided in th e design of major airports in many countries. women have already taken over many meteorological He was an early proponent of a plan to have noisy posts, we hear.) Therefore, women with training or jetliners climb steeply to spare surrounding residential experience in meteorology or its branches should areas, and developed effective noise-abatement climb apply immediately for any of the current or forthcom- procedures for high-performance aircraft. He devel- ing U.S. Civil Service examinations in meteorology oped and patented a stall-safety wing structure that which are open to them (see announcement Dec. was employed in propeller-driven and jet-propelled Bulletin, p. 6). Those in position to take courses in airliners over a period of years. meteorology this academic year should by all means Garbell wrote the first authoritative book on meteo- do so if they have any interest in the science and the rology of the low latitudes called Tropical and Equato- necessary background of physics and mathematics. rial Meteorology. He also wrote numerous papers Official sanction for admitting wome n to the denfense about operational and technical advances in the field meteorological training courses at th e five universities of aviation that appeared in publications around the starting March 2 has already been given. world, as well as other books. A Junior Meteorologist examination is open till Garbell held advance d degrees from the Institute of June; inquire of Civil Service offices. Technology of Berlin-Charlottenburg, Germany, and This will be an opportunity to join the vanguard of the Institute of Technology of Milan, Italy, from which the many women who will very likely find careers in he also held a doctorate in Mechanical Engineering. meteorology in the not too distant future and at the Garbell traveled extensively and is said to have same time it will be a patriotic choice in case the war spoken 14 languages. He is survived by his wife, should require many wome n to replace or supplement Esther Feitelberg Garbell of San Francisco; two men as meteorologists. daughters, Ruth Alm a Garbell of New York and Irene Garbell Rothschilds of San Rafael; and four grand- Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 23, 46, children. • Bulletin American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

was an enthusiastic booster of athletics at UCLA, and 25 years ago several generations of football players may remember his Introductory Physics 10 lectures. It is doubtful that he ever failed a goo d athlete wh o wa s also an attentive Sovie t Weather Satellite. The first Soviet weather student, and in an interview with the Los Angeles satellite, Cosmos-122, was launched on 25 June Times he is quoted as saying, "I see no difference in 1966. The satellite was placed in a circular orbit at a boy preparing to become a football or basketball an altitude of 625 km and inclimation of 65 degrees. player or a boy learning to be a violinist, a social Judging from a report by I. P. Vetlov published in worker, or a surgeon"; and his advice to a UCLA the WM O Bulletin of October 1966, Cosmos-122 is defensive halfback was, "Never collide with anyone. quite similar to the ESSA satellites and gathers the Just intercept those passes and run out of bounds. same data. Some excellent cloud cover pictures That's elementary physics." were included in the article. Kaplan's first wife, Katherine, died several years ago. He is survived by his second wife, Frances, who Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 48, 35. lives in Los Angeles.— Willia m Kellogg. William W. Kellogg is a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and one of Joe Kaplan's former graduate students. Opportunit y for Wome n in Meteorological Work. Although there has been much prejudice against and few precedents for employing women generally for professional work in meteorology, perhaps a dozen Mauric e A. Garbell women have obtained meteorological positions in the 1914-1990 last few years, mostly outside the government ser- vice. However, since there is at present an acute Dr. Maurice A. Garbell passed shortage of both trained meteorologists and men for away on 24 February 1990 at Pa- observers and clerical positions in the Weather Bu- cific Presbyterian Hospital after a reau and other government agencies, airlines, etc., short illness. He was 75. women with th e proper qualification (same as for men) Garbell, an internationally rec- are now being welcome in many places where they ognized expert in flight safety and airport design, were not encouraged even last year. (In England aided in th e design of major airports in many countries. women have already taken over many meteorological He was an early proponent of a plan to have noisy posts, we hear.) Therefore, women with training or jetliners climb steeply to spare surrounding residential experience in meteorology or its branches should areas, and developed effective noise-abatement climb apply immediately for any of the current or forthcom- procedures for high-performance aircraft. He devel- ing U.S. Civil Service examinations in meteorology oped and patented a stall-safety wing structure that which are open to them (see announcement Dec. was employed in propeller-driven and jet-propelled Bulletin, p. 6). Those in position to take courses in airliners over a period of years. meteorology this academic year should by all means Garbell wrote the first authoritative book on meteo- do so if they have any interest in the science and the rology of the low latitudes called Tropical and Equato- necessary background of physics and mathematics. rial Meteorology. He also wrote numerous papers Official sanction for admitting wome n to the denfense about operational and technical advances in the field meteorological training courses at th e five universities of aviation that appeared in publications around the starting March 2 has already been given. world, as well as other books. A Junior Meteorologist examination is open till Garbell held advance d degrees from the Institute of June; inquire of Civil Service offices. Technology of Berlin-Charlottenburg, Germany, and This will be an opportunity to join the vanguard of the Institute of Technology of Milan, Italy, from which the many women who will very likely find careers in he also held a doctorate in Mechanical Engineering. meteorology in the not too distant future and at the Garbell traveled extensively and is said to have same time it will be a patriotic choice in case the war spoken 14 languages. He is survived by his wife, should require many wome n to replace or supplement Esther Feitelberg Garbell of San Francisco; two men as meteorologists. daughters, Ruth Alm a Garbell of New York and Irene Garbell Rothschilds of San Rafael; and four grand- Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 23, 46, children. • Bulletin American Meteorological Society

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1992

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