50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO pared to hurricanes, tornadoes, and flash floods. He ers are prone to overforecast snowfall amounts the next described some of the safety aspects of preventing time around, leading to embarrassing public relations. lightning injuries, including the 30-30 rule-taking pre- Snow forecasting involves knowing the precipita- cautions when thunder occurs within 30 seconds of tion type, the amount, the synoptic and mesoscale situ- lightning (within 6 miles) and waiting 30 minutes af- ation, and involvement of any activity. Forecasters ter the last thunder before resuming outdoor activities. must know the limits of each model. Each pattern must be identified and low-level temperature biases are very Several local chapter members attended the AMS important, especially near heavy urban centers. Junker meetings. Bob Hillestad helped on the registration/ cautioned that the rain/snow line and depth of cold air help desk, while Jeff Brown and Steve LaDochy pre- and precipitable water are critical elements. sented papers in the Fujita and education confer- ences.—Steve LaDochy. Greater St. Louis A good crowd of almost 30 local chapter members packed the Pere Desmet Room 25 January at Saint Observations and Theory Louis University's Busch Center in St. Louis city. Ron of Flow over Log Ranges Przybylinski commenced the business meeting. Chapter Secretary Lou Hull read a brief account of the November meeting with Mike Biggerstaff. It was Editor's Note: A joint meeting of AMS and accepted as read. Karan Hofmann reported a new bal- the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences was ance of $564.79, up $65.21 mostly due to several new held 25 January 1950. The following is an memberships. Hull also reported five new members, excerpt from Joachim Kuettner and Philip four signed up prior to the dinner, bringing the total Duncan Thompson's paper. membership to 46, not including the three lifetime memberships. Discussion: In reply to a question on how Przybylinski asked Wayne McCollum to discuss much to allow for pressure-altimeter errors the AMS Annual Meeting. It was well attended with and downdrafts in the lee of a mountain ridge, over 500 meteorologists on hand. McCollum indicated Dr. Kuettner said that no reliable information there were around 15 posters representing the local on pressure-altimeter errors was yet available, chapters. He urged future attendees not to miss the but that he hoped to obtain some. The error chapter breakfast. was not as great as 2000 or 3000 ft, he Przybylinski described the Fujita symposium and thought; but whatever it is, it is minor rela- other severe storm meetings he attended. Several of tive to the large potential effect of down cur- our local chapter members were in attendance. G. V. rents. These, at 3000 ft/min can mean a loss Rao invited members to participate in the Missouri of 10,000 or more ft, even at full power, in a Academy of Science symposium at the University of few minutes, especially if the Missouri on 15 April. Przybylinski announced the in- transport plane does not en- volvement of Jim Moore and Charles Graves in the ter the wave normal to the CIPS program (Cooperative Institute of Precipitation axis of the wave. Sometimes, Studies). This is a big plus for SLU's meteorology pro- air transports cannot cross gram in the study of precipitation events. the Alps. The only way to No speaker was announced for February, but Dan combat the large effects of McCarthy was the March speaker. Przybylinski intro- downdrafts is to ascend to a duced Wes Junker, a lead forecaster from the Heavy great height before reaching Precipitation Branch, NOAA/NCEP. Junker graduated the disturbed area. from Penn State University in 1970 and has been in- volved in rain and snow forecasting with the NWS ever since. Junker's topic was winter weather forecasting. Bull. Amer. Meteor, Soc., 31, 168. He led off with examples of heavy snow events that were not well forecasted. On the East Coast especially, the events are nonlinear and defy the models. Forecast- Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1111 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

pared to hurricanes, tornadoes, and flash floods. He ers are prone to overforecast snowfall amounts the next described some of the safety aspects of preventing time around, leading to embarrassing public relations. lightning injuries, including the 30-30 rule-taking pre- Snow forecasting involves knowing the precipita- cautions when thunder occurs within 30 seconds of tion type, the amount, the synoptic and mesoscale situ- lightning (within 6 miles) and waiting 30 minutes af- ation, and involvement of any activity. Forecasters ter the last thunder before resuming outdoor activities. must know the limits of each model. Each pattern must be identified and low-level temperature biases are very Several local chapter members attended the AMS important, especially near heavy urban centers. Junker meetings. Bob Hillestad helped on the registration/ cautioned that the rain/snow line and depth of cold air help desk, while Jeff Brown and Steve LaDochy pre- and precipitable water are critical elements. sented papers in the Fujita and education confer- ences.—Steve LaDochy. Greater St. Louis A good crowd of almost 30 local chapter members packed the Pere Desmet Room 25 January at Saint Observations and Theory Louis University's Busch Center in St. Louis city. Ron of Flow over Log Ranges Przybylinski commenced the business meeting. Chapter Secretary Lou Hull read a brief account of the November meeting with Mike Biggerstaff. It was Editor's Note: A joint meeting of AMS and accepted as read. Karan Hofmann reported a new bal- the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences was ance of $564.79, up $65.21 mostly due to several new held 25 January 1950. The following is an memberships. Hull also reported five new members, excerpt from Joachim Kuettner and Philip four signed up prior to the dinner, bringing the total Duncan Thompson's paper. membership to 46, not including the three lifetime memberships. Discussion: In reply to a question on how Przybylinski asked Wayne McCollum to discuss much to allow for pressure-altimeter errors the AMS Annual Meeting. It was well attended with and downdrafts in the lee of a mountain ridge, over 500 meteorologists on hand. McCollum indicated Dr. Kuettner said that no reliable information there were around 15 posters representing the local on pressure-altimeter errors was yet available, chapters. He urged future attendees not to miss the but that he hoped to obtain some. The error chapter breakfast. was not as great as 2000 or 3000 ft, he Przybylinski described the Fujita symposium and thought; but whatever it is, it is minor rela- other severe storm meetings he attended. Several of tive to the large potential effect of down cur- our local chapter members were in attendance. G. V. rents. These, at 3000 ft/min can mean a loss Rao invited members to participate in the Missouri of 10,000 or more ft, even at full power, in a Academy of Science symposium at the University of few minutes, especially if the Missouri on 15 April. Przybylinski announced the in- transport plane does not en- volvement of Jim Moore and Charles Graves in the ter the wave normal to the CIPS program (Cooperative Institute of Precipitation axis of the wave. Sometimes, Studies). This is a big plus for SLU's meteorology pro- air transports cannot cross gram in the study of precipitation events. the Alps. The only way to No speaker was announced for February, but Dan combat the large effects of McCarthy was the March speaker. Przybylinski intro- downdrafts is to ascend to a duced Wes Junker, a lead forecaster from the Heavy great height before reaching Precipitation Branch, NOAA/NCEP. Junker graduated the disturbed area. from Penn State University in 1970 and has been in- volved in rain and snow forecasting with the NWS ever since. Junker's topic was winter weather forecasting. Bull. Amer. Meteor, Soc., 31, 168. He led off with examples of heavy snow events that were not well forecasted. On the East Coast especially, the events are nonlinear and defy the models. Forecast- Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1111

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: May 1, 2000

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