50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO Hood and her team planned to fly the NASA planes of-the-art airborne instruments to measure moisture and in conjunction with scheduled storm flights of the wind fields around the hurricanes under observation. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration "We will analyze the high-altitude storm informa- (NOAA) and the "Hurricane Hunters"—the U.S. Air tion within the context of more traditional low-level Force's 53d Weather Reconnaissance Squadron. The aircraft observations, and satellite and ground-based Hurricane Hunters and NOAA routinely fly into tropi- radar observations," said Hood. "This new informa- cal storms and hurricanes to determine the location, tion should provide insight to hurricane modelers— motion, strength, and size of the storm. The informa- forecasters who continually strive to improve hurri- tion that the two organizations gather is used to pre- cane predictions." dict the potential strength and size of the storm as well The hurricane study is part of NASA's Earth Sci- as landfall. ence enterprise to better understand the total earth sys- In addition to providing Doppler radars on each tem and the effects of natural and human-induced research plane, NASA for the first time will bring state- changes on the global environment. • Rehabilitate the Zugspitze Observatory! Prof. Dr. L. Weick- ".. . the German mountain weather sta- mann, head of the Ger- tion Zugspitze, which before the war was man Weather service, a very well equipped meteorological sta- American Zone, writes, tion .. . [was] destroyed by the war; all fur- ". . . may I dare asking niture cast down the hill, instruments bro- this honourable society to ken, wind vane and rain gauge shot thru, help me in a particular need. etc. The observational equipment by the "Last winter had been very snowy in the kind help of the U.S. Army has been rees- mountains, especially on the top of the tablished. I would be very thankful if the Zugspitze, our mountain observatory well AMS would present its help for restoring known to all meteorologists at home and this important meteorological station in the abroad by its 50 years' useful work. I have Alps. not been able during the last winter to pro- "Thanking you once more for all your cure for the two observers on Zugspitze, help, and goodwill [2 C.A.R.E. packages], Dr. Joachin Kuettner and Ernst Model, the I am necessary mountain and winter equipment, Yours, mountain boots, furcoat, furcap, gloves, [signed] Prof. Dr. L. Weickmann." etc. They are missing beds, blankets, nearly The Secretary's office will be glad to all kitchen and cleaning equipment, shov- take care of assembling and shipping cloth- els, picks, electric bulbs, etc., etc. and were ing and equipment, if donors will send forced to make observations under the very those to Milton (or cash to aid in war sur- hard conditions of climate on top of snowy plus purchases). C. F. Brooks, Secy., Am. Zugspitze during last winter without gloves Met'l. Soc., Milton 86, Mass. and warm coats. I am afraid that also for the coming winter I will meet very great diffi- culties in procuring all these things. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 29,433^134 . 219 0 Vol. 79 , No. 10,, October 1998 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

50 YEARS AGO

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Abstract

Hood and her team planned to fly the NASA planes of-the-art airborne instruments to measure moisture and in conjunction with scheduled storm flights of the wind fields around the hurricanes under observation. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration "We will analyze the high-altitude storm informa- (NOAA) and the "Hurricane Hunters"—the U.S. Air tion within the context of more traditional low-level Force's 53d Weather Reconnaissance Squadron. The aircraft observations, and satellite and ground-based Hurricane Hunters and NOAA routinely fly into tropi- radar observations," said Hood. "This new informa- cal storms and hurricanes to determine the location, tion should provide insight to hurricane modelers— motion, strength, and size of the storm. The informa- forecasters who continually strive to improve hurri- tion that the two organizations gather is used to pre- cane predictions." dict the potential strength and size of the storm as well The hurricane study is part of NASA's Earth Sci- as landfall. ence enterprise to better understand the total earth sys- In addition to providing Doppler radars on each tem and the effects of natural and human-induced research plane, NASA for the first time will bring state- changes on the global environment. • Rehabilitate the Zugspitze Observatory! Prof. Dr. L. Weick- ".. . the German mountain weather sta- mann, head of the Ger- tion Zugspitze, which before the war was man Weather service, a very well equipped meteorological sta- American Zone, writes, tion .. . [was] destroyed by the war; all fur- ". . . may I dare asking niture cast down the hill, instruments bro- this honourable society to ken, wind vane and rain gauge shot thru, help me in a particular need. etc. The observational equipment by the "Last winter had been very snowy in the kind help of the U.S. Army has been rees- mountains, especially on the top of the tablished. I would be very thankful if the Zugspitze, our mountain observatory well AMS would present its help for restoring known to all meteorologists at home and this important meteorological station in the abroad by its 50 years' useful work. I have Alps. not been able during the last winter to pro- "Thanking you once more for all your cure for the two observers on Zugspitze, help, and goodwill [2 C.A.R.E. packages], Dr. Joachin Kuettner and Ernst Model, the I am necessary mountain and winter equipment, Yours, mountain boots, furcoat, furcap, gloves, [signed] Prof. Dr. L. Weickmann." etc. They are missing beds, blankets, nearly The Secretary's office will be glad to all kitchen and cleaning equipment, shov- take care of assembling and shipping cloth- els, picks, electric bulbs, etc., etc. and were ing and equipment, if donors will send forced to make observations under the very those to Milton (or cash to aid in war sur- hard conditions of climate on top of snowy plus purchases). C. F. Brooks, Secy., Am. Zugspitze during last winter without gloves Met'l. Soc., Milton 86, Mass. and warm coats. I am afraid that also for the coming winter I will meet very great diffi- culties in procuring all these things. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 29,433^134 . 219 0 Vol. 79 , No. 10,, October 1998

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 1, 1998

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