50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO National Centers for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) nal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology. He has since 1985. He was associate director since 1995 and also served on several AMS committees and is past for the previous eight years was manager of the Sur- chair of the Committee on Meteorological Aspects of face and Sounding Sys- Air Pollution and the Committee on Measurements. tems facility in the Dabberdt is also a past recipient of a research fellow- Atmospheric Technology ship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Division. Prior to his time and a post-doctoral fellowship from the National at NCAR, Dabberdt was Research Council. wit h the Atmospheric Dabberdt received his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in Science Center at SRI Inter- meteorology from the University of Wisconsin— national (formerly Stanford Madison and a joint B.S. degree in meteorology and Research Institute). marine transportation from the State University of In 1997, Dabberdt was New York Maritime College. awarde d the AMS Dabberdt's research interests include meso- and Editor' s Award for his microscale meteorology, air pollution meteorology, contributions to the Jour- and atmospheric instrumentation.• Th e Thunderstor m v s the Airliner On June 23, 1950 .. . a large, heavily loaded transport plane plunged into Lake Michi- gan about 18 miles NNW of Benton Harbor, Michigan, and disappeared, with its 58 occu- pants . . .The pilots had been warned by the Weather Bureau and the Company of frontal thunderstorms with moderate to severe turbulence, and, by the Company: . . to pro- ceed with caution in the frontal zone . .. " The Weather Bureau's forecast.. . predicting widespread thunderstorm activity and a squall line extending from southern Wisconsin eastward into Lower Michigan and mov- ing southward, though made available in ample time, was not furnished the pilots by the Company because their meteorologist questioned the existence of a squall line at that time. Never- theless, official meteorological data and pilot reports indicate that the squall line became quite se- vere and that its southern edge was near the location of the accident at the time it occurred. The pilots of other flights over the southern Lake Michigan area within an hour before and after en- countered moderate to severe turbulence, and frequent cloud-cloud and cloud-ground lightning, but no hail [ . . . ] Thus, "it is known that the flight entered an area where there was severe turbulence and that it crashed shortly afterward. This fact in itself indicates that the accident probably resulted from either a structural failure caused by the turbulence, or because control of the airplane was lost." In these days of "all-weather" flying, thunderstorm hazards must still be fully respected. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 32, 145. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 7 09 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

National Centers for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) nal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology. He has since 1985. He was associate director since 1995 and also served on several AMS committees and is past for the previous eight years was manager of the Sur- chair of the Committee on Meteorological Aspects of face and Sounding Sys- Air Pollution and the Committee on Measurements. tems facility in the Dabberdt is also a past recipient of a research fellow- Atmospheric Technology ship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Division. Prior to his time and a post-doctoral fellowship from the National at NCAR, Dabberdt was Research Council. wit h the Atmospheric Dabberdt received his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in Science Center at SRI Inter- meteorology from the University of Wisconsin— national (formerly Stanford Madison and a joint B.S. degree in meteorology and Research Institute). marine transportation from the State University of In 1997, Dabberdt was New York Maritime College. awarde d the AMS Dabberdt's research interests include meso- and Editor' s Award for his microscale meteorology, air pollution meteorology, contributions to the Jour- and atmospheric instrumentation.• Th e Thunderstor m v s the Airliner On June 23, 1950 .. . a large, heavily loaded transport plane plunged into Lake Michi- gan about 18 miles NNW of Benton Harbor, Michigan, and disappeared, with its 58 occu- pants . . .The pilots had been warned by the Weather Bureau and the Company of frontal thunderstorms with moderate to severe turbulence, and, by the Company: . . to pro- ceed with caution in the frontal zone . .. " The Weather Bureau's forecast.. . predicting widespread thunderstorm activity and a squall line extending from southern Wisconsin eastward into Lower Michigan and mov- ing southward, though made available in ample time, was not furnished the pilots by the Company because their meteorologist questioned the existence of a squall line at that time. Never- theless, official meteorological data and pilot reports indicate that the squall line became quite se- vere and that its southern edge was near the location of the accident at the time it occurred. The pilots of other flights over the southern Lake Michigan area within an hour before and after en- countered moderate to severe turbulence, and frequent cloud-cloud and cloud-ground lightning, but no hail [ . . . ] Thus, "it is known that the flight entered an area where there was severe turbulence and that it crashed shortly afterward. This fact in itself indicates that the accident probably resulted from either a structural failure caused by the turbulence, or because control of the airplane was lost." In these days of "all-weather" flying, thunderstorm hazards must still be fully respected. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 32, 145. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 7 09

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 1, 2001

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