50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO contains a detailed table of contents and a glossary near a dry line. This chapter contains few oversim- plifications, though the terse explanation that "as that also serves as an index. Two pages of references rain falls through the storm it cools the air" and are included at the end of the book. Appendixes give causes a downdraft is unacceptable in view of the unit conversions and list Internet resources. details offered in the lengthy chapter. Eric Conway teaches earth science in Carroll County, Maryland, and the book resulted from an In summary, this book can serve as a valuable internship that he had with NOAA/NESDIS. The introduction to satellite imagery interpretation for wisdom and experience of many NESDIS scientists a wide range of readers. Most of the oversimplifi- has clearly been conveyed to the author and, hence, cations and misstatements will not be of any sig- to the reader in many places in the book, where nificanc e to the general reader. Instructors in very specific procedures are indicated for identi- fying and locating meteorological features. Chap- ters 10 and 12 include diagrams to enable the reader to estimate the central pressure of oceanic cyclones Weathermen Contract with Airline and tropical storms, respectively, from satellite on Basis of Forecast Accuracy imagery. Chapter 3 contains a parallax-correction chart to allow better estimation of the positions of cloud tops. These details allow the book to become Continental Air Lines me- a "hands-on" experience for the interested reader. teorologists have to be 90% Though most imagery is acceptable, in some right or lose their jobs. That instances it would have been better to use overlays clause was written into a (e.g., arrows) on the imagery to help the reader unique union contract that pinpoint the phenomena more precisely. Some of took effect last March. The the black and white images do not have map over- union: a new Society of Air- lays, and the printed imagery sometimes does not line Meteorologists, which is have adequate contrast or quality for the reader to out to organize airline weathermen nationally. pick out subtleties of gray shading. Some of the The contracts provides that, for safety's images are easier to see on the accompanying CD. sake, Continental meteorologists must give While the book will serve most readers well, accurate forecasts (1) of height of ceiling and meteorology instructors will need to correct vari- visibility at the Denver airport four hours in ous shortcomings. The Sargasso Sea is consider- advance, and (2) of weather conditions on the ably deeper than the "several hundred feet" company's 2,900 miles of routes. Meteorolo- indicated in chapter 14. Chapters 9 and 10 deal gists are to be graded on their forecasts (0%- with identification of synoptic-scale features and 100%) by pilots. The union has set 90% as a cyclogenesis. There are problems with the expla- "fair" standard. If a member of Continental nation of the formation of upper-air troughs and fails to keep that grade, he may be discharged ridges and in pinpointing the ridge axes in some without recourse to grievance procedures. of the examples. The midtropospheric vorticity cen- Union members must also swear annually that ter is located just west of a baroclinic leaf cloud, they are not Communists. The contract bars rather than within it. Thus, while it is admirable that them from striking or hampering company the book has taken steps to make the general reader operations. aware of the importance of upper-air features in Emmett T. Grace is national president of the influencing the weather, the explanations are not union.—Business Week, Apr. 3, 1948 (Cour- always adequate. Other clarifications suggested by tesy H. M. Brooks). this reviewer can be found on the World Wide Web (http://www.ems.psu.edu/~forbes/pas/satrvw.htm). Chapter 11, on thunderstorms and severe Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 29,480. weather, is the longest chapter and is rather thor- ough, including quality sections on mesoscale con- vective systems and mesoscale boundary intersections and a useful diagram of the airflow Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 2457 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

50 YEARS AGO

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Abstract

contains a detailed table of contents and a glossary near a dry line. This chapter contains few oversim- plifications, though the terse explanation that "as that also serves as an index. Two pages of references rain falls through the storm it cools the air" and are included at the end of the book. Appendixes give causes a downdraft is unacceptable in view of the unit conversions and list Internet resources. details offered in the lengthy chapter. Eric Conway teaches earth science in Carroll County, Maryland, and the book resulted from an In summary, this book can serve as a valuable internship that he had with NOAA/NESDIS. The introduction to satellite imagery interpretation for wisdom and experience of many NESDIS scientists a wide range of readers. Most of the oversimplifi- has clearly been conveyed to the author and, hence, cations and misstatements will not be of any sig- to the reader in many places in the book, where nificanc e to the general reader. Instructors in very specific procedures are indicated for identi- fying and locating meteorological features. Chap- ters 10 and 12 include diagrams to enable the reader to estimate the central pressure of oceanic cyclones Weathermen Contract with Airline and tropical storms, respectively, from satellite on Basis of Forecast Accuracy imagery. Chapter 3 contains a parallax-correction chart to allow better estimation of the positions of cloud tops. These details allow the book to become Continental Air Lines me- a "hands-on" experience for the interested reader. teorologists have to be 90% Though most imagery is acceptable, in some right or lose their jobs. That instances it would have been better to use overlays clause was written into a (e.g., arrows) on the imagery to help the reader unique union contract that pinpoint the phenomena more precisely. Some of took effect last March. The the black and white images do not have map over- union: a new Society of Air- lays, and the printed imagery sometimes does not line Meteorologists, which is have adequate contrast or quality for the reader to out to organize airline weathermen nationally. pick out subtleties of gray shading. Some of the The contracts provides that, for safety's images are easier to see on the accompanying CD. sake, Continental meteorologists must give While the book will serve most readers well, accurate forecasts (1) of height of ceiling and meteorology instructors will need to correct vari- visibility at the Denver airport four hours in ous shortcomings. The Sargasso Sea is consider- advance, and (2) of weather conditions on the ably deeper than the "several hundred feet" company's 2,900 miles of routes. Meteorolo- indicated in chapter 14. Chapters 9 and 10 deal gists are to be graded on their forecasts (0%- with identification of synoptic-scale features and 100%) by pilots. The union has set 90% as a cyclogenesis. There are problems with the expla- "fair" standard. If a member of Continental nation of the formation of upper-air troughs and fails to keep that grade, he may be discharged ridges and in pinpointing the ridge axes in some without recourse to grievance procedures. of the examples. The midtropospheric vorticity cen- Union members must also swear annually that ter is located just west of a baroclinic leaf cloud, they are not Communists. The contract bars rather than within it. Thus, while it is admirable that them from striking or hampering company the book has taken steps to make the general reader operations. aware of the importance of upper-air features in Emmett T. Grace is national president of the influencing the weather, the explanations are not union.—Business Week, Apr. 3, 1948 (Cour- always adequate. Other clarifications suggested by tesy H. M. Brooks). this reviewer can be found on the World Wide Web (http://www.ems.psu.edu/~forbes/pas/satrvw.htm). Chapter 11, on thunderstorms and severe Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 29,480. weather, is the longest chapter and is rather thor- ough, including quality sections on mesoscale con- vective systems and mesoscale boundary intersections and a useful diagram of the airflow Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 2457

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Nov 1, 1998

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