50 Years Ago

50 Years Ago 19 September 1995 at the Cheyenne NWS Forecast Conzemius discussed new business and introduced Office. Twenty people attended. The guest speaker the speaker, Gerald Larson. Larson is a middle school was Jim Hatten, lead forecaster with the NWS in teacher in Hudson, Wisconsin, and is an Atmospheric Cheyenne. Hatten spoke on freezing drizzle and rain Educatio n Resource Agent for AMS' s Project events in southeast Wyoming. Hatten compiled sta- ATMOSPHERE. He gave a general description of tistics regarding freezing drizzle in the area, which is Project ATMOSPHERE and presented some of the the biggest freezing precipitation problem forecasters teaching methods used to relate basic meteorological face on the central high plains. Most of the freezing concepts to elementary and middle school students. drizzle events and longer duration events are in No- Larson also described the DataStreme project, by vember, March, and April, with a strong southeast which weather graphic images are broadcast over the wind flow in the lower layers. Hatten said that in a Weathe r Channel cable frequency to classrooms freezing drizzle event, research has shown that a layer across the country. above freezing does not have to be present. The 21 October 1995 meeting was held in the Twenty-five people convened on 16 October 1995 Counci l Chambers at Bloomington City Hall in at the Laramie County Community College in Chey- Bloomington, Minnesota. Chapter President Robert J. enne for the second chapter meeting. Russ Ashenden, Conzemius began the meeting with new business. He a graduate student in the University of Wyoming's introduced Scott Woelm, the guest speaker. Department of Atmospheric Science, was the guest Woelm, a storm chaser and metro Sky war n instruc- speaker. Ashenden gave a presentation on the meteo- tor, began his presentation with a video showing a rological aspects of the crash of the American Eagle high risk bust—a day when the National Severe ATR-72 flight in northern Indiana on 31 October Storms Forecast Center indicated a high risk of severe 1994. Ashenden has conducted research on aircraft weather across much of southern and central Minne- performance in various types of weather. In his talk, sota but none actually occurred. Videos from that day Ashenden discussed how an unexpected amount of showed a group that went out on the road with high clear icing exceeded aircraft performance capabilities, anticipation of severe weather and came back with no resulting in the crash. Freezing drizzle and rain were discussed, and it was mentioned that the worst part of a storm system is under the dry slot of the comma Foreign Students of Meteorology in the cloud. Ashenden said that this is typically where clear United States icing is most prevalent at mid and lower levels and is In recent years the Weather the most dangerous.—Mike Weiland. Bureau, jointly with the Univer- sity of California at Los Ange- Central Texas les, University of Chicago, and Members convened on 15 November 1995 to hear the Massachusetts Institute of Karen Devlin discuss the study of mesoscale convec- Technology have been hosts to tive systems in the Tropics. Devlin, who recently re- a number of students from Latin ceived her M.S. in meteorology from Texas A&M America and other countries. In University, conducted research on the topic using the 1945, of 8 such, one each was from Bolivia, 85 GHz ice scattering signature.—Bob Rose. Chile, Colombia, and 3 fro m Mexico. Eight Chi- nese students, including 2 women, started on a Twin Cities special course in October. Each student, after Outgoing chapter president Eve Bowman brought completing his professional course in meteorol- the meeting to order on 21 September 1995 in the Soils ogy is assigned to a Weather Bureau forecast Science Building on the University of Minnesota St. center for a few months for the practical appli- Paul campus. Robert J. Conzemius was sworn in as cation of what has been learned. In 1946 there the chapter president for the 1995/96 season and Tho- will be one representative each from Brazil, mas St. Martin was sworn in as the secretary-trea- Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, and Peru.—C. surer. Marc Kavinsky, who had volunteered for the F. B. (based on W. B. Topics and Personnel). chapter vice president position, was unanimously ap- Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 27, 5. proved by chapter members to be the chapter vice president. 13 7 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

19 September 1995 at the Cheyenne NWS Forecast Conzemius discussed new business and introduced Office. Twenty people attended. The guest speaker the speaker, Gerald Larson. Larson is a middle school was Jim Hatten, lead forecaster with the NWS in teacher in Hudson, Wisconsin, and is an Atmospheric Cheyenne. Hatten spoke on freezing drizzle and rain Educatio n Resource Agent for AMS' s Project events in southeast Wyoming. Hatten compiled sta- ATMOSPHERE. He gave a general description of tistics regarding freezing drizzle in the area, which is Project ATMOSPHERE and presented some of the the biggest freezing precipitation problem forecasters teaching methods used to relate basic meteorological face on the central high plains. Most of the freezing concepts to elementary and middle school students. drizzle events and longer duration events are in No- Larson also described the DataStreme project, by vember, March, and April, with a strong southeast which weather graphic images are broadcast over the wind flow in the lower layers. Hatten said that in a Weathe r Channel cable frequency to classrooms freezing drizzle event, research has shown that a layer across the country. above freezing does not have to be present. The 21 October 1995 meeting was held in the Twenty-five people convened on 16 October 1995 Counci l Chambers at Bloomington City Hall in at the Laramie County Community College in Chey- Bloomington, Minnesota. Chapter President Robert J. enne for the second chapter meeting. Russ Ashenden, Conzemius began the meeting with new business. He a graduate student in the University of Wyoming's introduced Scott Woelm, the guest speaker. Department of Atmospheric Science, was the guest Woelm, a storm chaser and metro Sky war n instruc- speaker. Ashenden gave a presentation on the meteo- tor, began his presentation with a video showing a rological aspects of the crash of the American Eagle high risk bust—a day when the National Severe ATR-72 flight in northern Indiana on 31 October Storms Forecast Center indicated a high risk of severe 1994. Ashenden has conducted research on aircraft weather across much of southern and central Minne- performance in various types of weather. In his talk, sota but none actually occurred. Videos from that day Ashenden discussed how an unexpected amount of showed a group that went out on the road with high clear icing exceeded aircraft performance capabilities, anticipation of severe weather and came back with no resulting in the crash. Freezing drizzle and rain were discussed, and it was mentioned that the worst part of a storm system is under the dry slot of the comma Foreign Students of Meteorology in the cloud. Ashenden said that this is typically where clear United States icing is most prevalent at mid and lower levels and is In recent years the Weather the most dangerous.—Mike Weiland. Bureau, jointly with the Univer- sity of California at Los Ange- Central Texas les, University of Chicago, and Members convened on 15 November 1995 to hear the Massachusetts Institute of Karen Devlin discuss the study of mesoscale convec- Technology have been hosts to tive systems in the Tropics. Devlin, who recently re- a number of students from Latin ceived her M.S. in meteorology from Texas A&M America and other countries. In University, conducted research on the topic using the 1945, of 8 such, one each was from Bolivia, 85 GHz ice scattering signature.—Bob Rose. Chile, Colombia, and 3 fro m Mexico. Eight Chi- nese students, including 2 women, started on a Twin Cities special course in October. Each student, after Outgoing chapter president Eve Bowman brought completing his professional course in meteorol- the meeting to order on 21 September 1995 in the Soils ogy is assigned to a Weather Bureau forecast Science Building on the University of Minnesota St. center for a few months for the practical appli- Paul campus. Robert J. Conzemius was sworn in as cation of what has been learned. In 1946 there the chapter president for the 1995/96 season and Tho- will be one representative each from Brazil, mas St. Martin was sworn in as the secretary-trea- Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, and Peru.—C. surer. Marc Kavinsky, who had volunteered for the F. B. (based on W. B. Topics and Personnel). chapter vice president position, was unanimously ap- Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 27, 5. proved by chapter members to be the chapter vice president. 13 7 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1996

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