50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO have philosophized as to what he believes to be the possibility for their future specialization, cannot afford topics with which an air pollution meteorologist be- to be without this volume. They will discover the need comes involved. This seems to be a task that is left to to turn to it frequently to find answers to many ques- the reader to seek the answers. Although many air tions they will encounter. pollution meteorologists spend much effort in prop- I would believe that students who complete a course erly applying and interpreting output from air quality where this text has a major use would be well grounded dispersion models, there are a number of other inter- in subject areas preparing them for occupations in air esting activities that could have been discussed, or at pollution meteorology, whether in government or pri- least mentioned or listed. vate practice.—D. Bruce Turner. Throughout this book, the extensive sets of prob- lems and exercises at the end of each chapter challenge Bruce Turner is a certified consulting meteorolo- the reader to think carefully about the material pre- gist who has worked with Trinity Consultants since his sented in the chapter and in many cases to do consid- retirement from NOAA in 1989. He consults on erable work to obtain answers. projects involving air pollution meteorology and dis- persion modeling and teaches the two-day course I am of the opinion that any professional meteorolo- "Fundamentals of Dispersion Modeling " about five gist who works on air pollution problems, or a meteo- times per year. • rologist wanting to learn more about this field as a "Tellus," A New Swedish Quarterly Journal of Geophysics A letter from Prof. tributions in these fields, it is nevertheless our Rossby informs us of the hope to make Tellus into an increasingly inter- plans of the Swedish Geo- national forum. For these reasons all contribu- physical Society in Stock- tions will be published in English, French, or holm to publish a new journal which will be de- German; geophysicists in all countries are in- voted to fields of interest of members of the vited to submit articles or surveys. American Meteorological Society. Prof. Rossby, "The first number of Tellus will appear in who will be the Editor, describes the plan as March 1949. This issue will contain a prelimi- follows: nary report by H. Pettersson on the Albatross "The new journal has been named Tellus and oceanographic expedition, meteorological ar- is scheduled to appear quarterly, beginning with ticles by T. Bergeron, E. Palmen and A. Nyberg, the first quarter of 1949. It is published with the as well as an analysis by O. Rydbeck of certain aid of a grant from the Swedish Government and recent ionospheric measurement in Lappland. with generous assistance from one of the great- "The format of Tellus is 179 x 250 mm and est publishing and printing houses of Sweden, each issue will contain 48-64 pages. The sub- Generalstabens Litografiska Anstalt. An Advi- scription price is U.S. $6.00 per year, or the of- sory Board with members drawn from among the ficial equivalent amount in other currencies. leaders of Geophysics in Sweden will provide the "Manuscripts, business correspondence, sub- necessary scientific support. scription orders, et cetera should be addressed to: "Tellus is intended as a medium for the pub- Editor of Tellus, Department of Meteorology, lication of original contributions, surveys and University of Stockholm, Stockholm 12, Sweden." discussions in all branches of Geophysics. While the new journal necessarily must serve as an outlet for Swedish and other Scandanavian con- Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 30, 75. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 31 1 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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10.1175/1520-0477-80.2.311
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Abstract

have philosophized as to what he believes to be the possibility for their future specialization, cannot afford topics with which an air pollution meteorologist be- to be without this volume. They will discover the need comes involved. This seems to be a task that is left to to turn to it frequently to find answers to many ques- the reader to seek the answers. Although many air tions they will encounter. pollution meteorologists spend much effort in prop- I would believe that students who complete a course erly applying and interpreting output from air quality where this text has a major use would be well grounded dispersion models, there are a number of other inter- in subject areas preparing them for occupations in air esting activities that could have been discussed, or at pollution meteorology, whether in government or pri- least mentioned or listed. vate practice.—D. Bruce Turner. Throughout this book, the extensive sets of prob- lems and exercises at the end of each chapter challenge Bruce Turner is a certified consulting meteorolo- the reader to think carefully about the material pre- gist who has worked with Trinity Consultants since his sented in the chapter and in many cases to do consid- retirement from NOAA in 1989. He consults on erable work to obtain answers. projects involving air pollution meteorology and dis- persion modeling and teaches the two-day course I am of the opinion that any professional meteorolo- "Fundamentals of Dispersion Modeling " about five gist who works on air pollution problems, or a meteo- times per year. • rologist wanting to learn more about this field as a "Tellus," A New Swedish Quarterly Journal of Geophysics A letter from Prof. tributions in these fields, it is nevertheless our Rossby informs us of the hope to make Tellus into an increasingly inter- plans of the Swedish Geo- national forum. For these reasons all contribu- physical Society in Stock- tions will be published in English, French, or holm to publish a new journal which will be de- German; geophysicists in all countries are in- voted to fields of interest of members of the vited to submit articles or surveys. American Meteorological Society. Prof. Rossby, "The first number of Tellus will appear in who will be the Editor, describes the plan as March 1949. This issue will contain a prelimi- follows: nary report by H. Pettersson on the Albatross "The new journal has been named Tellus and oceanographic expedition, meteorological ar- is scheduled to appear quarterly, beginning with ticles by T. Bergeron, E. Palmen and A. Nyberg, the first quarter of 1949. It is published with the as well as an analysis by O. Rydbeck of certain aid of a grant from the Swedish Government and recent ionospheric measurement in Lappland. with generous assistance from one of the great- "The format of Tellus is 179 x 250 mm and est publishing and printing houses of Sweden, each issue will contain 48-64 pages. The sub- Generalstabens Litografiska Anstalt. An Advi- scription price is U.S. $6.00 per year, or the of- sory Board with members drawn from among the ficial equivalent amount in other currencies. leaders of Geophysics in Sweden will provide the "Manuscripts, business correspondence, sub- necessary scientific support. scription orders, et cetera should be addressed to: "Tellus is intended as a medium for the pub- Editor of Tellus, Department of Meteorology, lication of original contributions, surveys and University of Stockholm, Stockholm 12, Sweden." discussions in all branches of Geophysics. While the new journal necessarily must serve as an outlet for Swedish and other Scandanavian con- Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 30, 75. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 31 1

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Feb 1, 1999

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