50 Years Ago

50 Years Ago been established as an independent corporation and Jay Hobgood, associ- provider of workstation solutions for the meteorologi- ate professor of geogra- cal and aviation communities. phy and director of the The firms' principals are Gregory D. Smith, co- Atmospheri c Sciences founder and president, and Paul O. G. Heppner, ex- Program at the Ohio State ecutive vice president. Smith, formerly a vice presi- University , received a dent of RMS Technologies, has been involved in hard- 1996 Alumni Award for ware and software design and engineering, manufac- Distinguished Teaching. turing, systems integration, and quality assurance for Hobgood teaches upper- a number of technical applications, including airfield leve l courses in atmo- lighting, access control, and Geographical Informa- spheric sciences and an tion Systems for the weather community for more than introductor y course in 17 years. He also administered the development of meteorology . A faculty graphical weather display and dissemination systems member at Ohio State since 1987, he developed the for the international forecast and aviation markets. cor e curriculum in the Atmospheric Sciences Heppner received a B.S. and an M.S. in meteorology Program. from The Pennsylvania State University and has ex- In conjunction with the award, Hobgood was in- perience as a broadcast meteorologist. He supervised ducted into the Academy of Teaching during the the design, implementation, and support of meteoro- spring commencement. Its members are responsible logical workstations and implemented new worksta- fo r promoting, enhancing, and recognizing good tion technology for meteorological clients in the Neth- teaching. • erlands and in Asia. Editor's note: For many years the Society held an of 60 or 90 days before applications annual spring meeting in Washington, D.C., concur- should be considered was urged. rently with the annual meeting of the American Geo- (2) Whether or not the next annual physical Union. The October 1946Bulletin contained meeting should be held in Boston or the minutes of the Council meetings held during the Ne w York was discussed at some 1946 Spring Meeting. The following is an excerpt of length. The prime point is to have the those minutes. annual meeting as such time and place as would attract the most representa- Meetin g of Ma y 27 , 1946, in Washington , D.C tive group. President Houghton was of the opinion that the Boston meeting would be the larger of the two, (Hall of Government, George Washington Univ., and, therefore, should have the annual meeting. He 12:15 to 1:10 P.M. ) also pointed out that if the annual meeting were placed in the New York meeting this would tend to reduce Present: Pres. Houghton, Messrs. Bjerknes, Byers, participation in the Boston meeting. Little, Reichelderfer, and Brooks. Capt. Orville and Dr. Reichelderfer indicated, how- (1) The formalization of applications by industrial ever, that the end of December was a crowded time meteorologists for the support of the Society in ob- for aviation interests and indeed for others except taining teletype service from the Weather Bureau was those in university work. discussed. Dr. Reichelderfer stated and the others Secretary Brooks said he thought it would be a concurred that it seemed particularly desirable that mistake to have the annual meeting in New York prac- bona fide interest in meteorology as a profession and tically every year: members in other parts of the coun- competence as a professional meteorologist should be try should have an easy chance to participate. Boston, demonstrated by applicants having been professional being a major meteorological center, had a good members in good standing over a period. A minimum claim. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 27, 456-457. 2338 Vol. 77, No. 10, October 1996 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

50 Years Ago

Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society , Volume 77 (10): 1 – Oct 1, 1996
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American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-77.10.2352
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Abstract

been established as an independent corporation and Jay Hobgood, associ- provider of workstation solutions for the meteorologi- ate professor of geogra- cal and aviation communities. phy and director of the The firms' principals are Gregory D. Smith, co- Atmospheri c Sciences founder and president, and Paul O. G. Heppner, ex- Program at the Ohio State ecutive vice president. Smith, formerly a vice presi- University , received a dent of RMS Technologies, has been involved in hard- 1996 Alumni Award for ware and software design and engineering, manufac- Distinguished Teaching. turing, systems integration, and quality assurance for Hobgood teaches upper- a number of technical applications, including airfield leve l courses in atmo- lighting, access control, and Geographical Informa- spheric sciences and an tion Systems for the weather community for more than introductor y course in 17 years. He also administered the development of meteorology . A faculty graphical weather display and dissemination systems member at Ohio State since 1987, he developed the for the international forecast and aviation markets. cor e curriculum in the Atmospheric Sciences Heppner received a B.S. and an M.S. in meteorology Program. from The Pennsylvania State University and has ex- In conjunction with the award, Hobgood was in- perience as a broadcast meteorologist. He supervised ducted into the Academy of Teaching during the the design, implementation, and support of meteoro- spring commencement. Its members are responsible logical workstations and implemented new worksta- fo r promoting, enhancing, and recognizing good tion technology for meteorological clients in the Neth- teaching. • erlands and in Asia. Editor's note: For many years the Society held an of 60 or 90 days before applications annual spring meeting in Washington, D.C., concur- should be considered was urged. rently with the annual meeting of the American Geo- (2) Whether or not the next annual physical Union. The October 1946Bulletin contained meeting should be held in Boston or the minutes of the Council meetings held during the Ne w York was discussed at some 1946 Spring Meeting. The following is an excerpt of length. The prime point is to have the those minutes. annual meeting as such time and place as would attract the most representa- Meetin g of Ma y 27 , 1946, in Washington , D.C tive group. President Houghton was of the opinion that the Boston meeting would be the larger of the two, (Hall of Government, George Washington Univ., and, therefore, should have the annual meeting. He 12:15 to 1:10 P.M. ) also pointed out that if the annual meeting were placed in the New York meeting this would tend to reduce Present: Pres. Houghton, Messrs. Bjerknes, Byers, participation in the Boston meeting. Little, Reichelderfer, and Brooks. Capt. Orville and Dr. Reichelderfer indicated, how- (1) The formalization of applications by industrial ever, that the end of December was a crowded time meteorologists for the support of the Society in ob- for aviation interests and indeed for others except taining teletype service from the Weather Bureau was those in university work. discussed. Dr. Reichelderfer stated and the others Secretary Brooks said he thought it would be a concurred that it seemed particularly desirable that mistake to have the annual meeting in New York prac- bona fide interest in meteorology as a profession and tically every year: members in other parts of the coun- competence as a professional meteorologist should be try should have an easy chance to participate. Boston, demonstrated by applicants having been professional being a major meteorological center, had a good members in good standing over a period. A minimum claim. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 27, 456-457. 2338 Vol. 77, No. 10, October 1996

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 1, 1996

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