50 years ago

50 years ago Billion Dollar U.S. Weather Disasters, 1980-93 The Research Customer Service Group, National Climatic Data Center, has compiled a list of weather-related disasters that produced damages exceeding $1.0 billion, wit h the past six years producing nine weather-related disasters exceeding estimated costs of $92.4 billion. California Wildfires, fall 1993. Southern California, estimated at least $1.0 billion damage/costs, 4 deaths. Severe Flood, summer 1993. Central United States, estimated $12.0 billion damage/costs, estimated 48 deaths. Drought/Heat Wave, summer 1993. Southeastern United States, estimated $ 1.0 billion damage/costs, death toll undetermined. StormlBlizzard, March 1993. Eastern United States, over $3.0 billion damage/costs, estimated 270 deaths. Hurricane Iniki, September 1992. Hawaiian Island of Kauai, about $1.8 billion damage/costs, 6 deaths. Hurricane Andrew, August 1992. Florida and Louisiana, about $25.0 billion damage/costs, 58 deaths. Hurricane Bob, August 1991. Mainly coastal Nort h Carolina, Long Island, and Ne w England, $ 1.5 billion damage/ costs, 18 deaths. Hurricane Hugo, September 1989. Nort h and South Carolina, $7.1 billion damage/costs, 57 deaths. Drought/Heat Wave, Summer 1988. Central and Eastern United States, estimated $40.0 billion damage/costs, estimated 5000 t o 10 000 deaths. Hurricane Juan, October-Novembe r 1985. Louisiana and Southeastern United States, $ 1.5 billion damage/costs, 63 deaths. Hurricane Elena, August-September 1985. Florida t o Louisiana, $1.3 billion damage/costs, 4 deaths. Hurricane Alicia, August 1983. Texas, $2.0 billion damage/costs, 21 deaths. Drought/Heat Wove, June-September 1980. Central and Eastern United States, estimated $20 billion damage/ costs, estimated 1300 deaths. Repor t of th e Committe e on Professional Standards and Practices in Meteorolog y for 1943 Thi s committe e has bee n relatively inactive during the year 1943. Th e article: "Ho w Weathe r is Use d a s a Weapon " whic h appeare d in th e Novembe r (1942) issue of Reader's Digest was noted an d given very careful consideration. Durin g 194 4 th e committe e ha s in min d givin g ver y carefu l attentio n t o th e larg e cro p of "Forecas t companies" an d individuals, not part of th e U.S. Weathe r Bureau, that is springin g up like mushroom s all ove r th e country sinc e th e regulations on forecastin g have bee n relaxed. Using high pressure i%fl \iaorc &ttf% salesmanship, they are attempting to sell their forecasts to individuals, Ox ) year b ay O newspapers, radio companies , and corporations. Th e short-range forecasts ar e often mere paraphrases of the Weather Bureau predictions. The long- rang e forecast s (whe n not statistical an d climatological ) usually have no foundatio n at all or a ver y inadequate secre t one. Committee: Willis I. Milham, Chairman, D. M. Little, J. J. George. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 25,111. 46 0 Vol. 75, No. 3, March 1994 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-75.3.460
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Abstract

Billion Dollar U.S. Weather Disasters, 1980-93 The Research Customer Service Group, National Climatic Data Center, has compiled a list of weather-related disasters that produced damages exceeding $1.0 billion, wit h the past six years producing nine weather-related disasters exceeding estimated costs of $92.4 billion. California Wildfires, fall 1993. Southern California, estimated at least $1.0 billion damage/costs, 4 deaths. Severe Flood, summer 1993. Central United States, estimated $12.0 billion damage/costs, estimated 48 deaths. Drought/Heat Wave, summer 1993. Southeastern United States, estimated $ 1.0 billion damage/costs, death toll undetermined. StormlBlizzard, March 1993. Eastern United States, over $3.0 billion damage/costs, estimated 270 deaths. Hurricane Iniki, September 1992. Hawaiian Island of Kauai, about $1.8 billion damage/costs, 6 deaths. Hurricane Andrew, August 1992. Florida and Louisiana, about $25.0 billion damage/costs, 58 deaths. Hurricane Bob, August 1991. Mainly coastal Nort h Carolina, Long Island, and Ne w England, $ 1.5 billion damage/ costs, 18 deaths. Hurricane Hugo, September 1989. Nort h and South Carolina, $7.1 billion damage/costs, 57 deaths. Drought/Heat Wave, Summer 1988. Central and Eastern United States, estimated $40.0 billion damage/costs, estimated 5000 t o 10 000 deaths. Hurricane Juan, October-Novembe r 1985. Louisiana and Southeastern United States, $ 1.5 billion damage/costs, 63 deaths. Hurricane Elena, August-September 1985. Florida t o Louisiana, $1.3 billion damage/costs, 4 deaths. Hurricane Alicia, August 1983. Texas, $2.0 billion damage/costs, 21 deaths. Drought/Heat Wove, June-September 1980. Central and Eastern United States, estimated $20 billion damage/ costs, estimated 1300 deaths. Repor t of th e Committe e on Professional Standards and Practices in Meteorolog y for 1943 Thi s committe e has bee n relatively inactive during the year 1943. Th e article: "Ho w Weathe r is Use d a s a Weapon " whic h appeare d in th e Novembe r (1942) issue of Reader's Digest was noted an d given very careful consideration. Durin g 194 4 th e committe e ha s in min d givin g ver y carefu l attentio n t o th e larg e cro p of "Forecas t companies" an d individuals, not part of th e U.S. Weathe r Bureau, that is springin g up like mushroom s all ove r th e country sinc e th e regulations on forecastin g have bee n relaxed. Using high pressure i%fl \iaorc &ttf% salesmanship, they are attempting to sell their forecasts to individuals, Ox ) year b ay O newspapers, radio companies , and corporations. Th e short-range forecasts ar e often mere paraphrases of the Weather Bureau predictions. The long- rang e forecast s (whe n not statistical an d climatological ) usually have no foundatio n at all or a ver y inadequate secre t one. Committee: Willis I. Milham, Chairman, D. M. Little, J. J. George. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 25,111. 46 0 Vol. 75, No. 3, March 1994

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1994

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