50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO Paleoclimate (paleoprecipitation) clearly serves as includin g a new GLOCOPH database and a key facet of complete and accurate characteriza- a chapter on the aims for future GLOCOPH tion of paleohydrological regimes. The following research. six chapters are part of a section titled "The Back- Although this book purposely presents little unpub- ground of Global Palaeohydrology." This section lished original research, it hits the mark as a set of presents the various types of geological, biologi- extremely comprehensive review papers (chapters). It cal, and archaeological records that aid in hydro- serves as a rich resource for paleohydrology and all logical reconstruction, global climate conditions that of its ancillary fields, with each chapter abundantly are particularly important to hydrological change, referenced and illustrated. The text is uniformly well response of streams to changing climate, the im- written and the book is well edited. It would make an pac t of continental-scale ice sheets, lake-level excellent textbook for a graduate class or seminar on changes, and the historical and prehistorical effects paleohydrology, although the price might be a hard- of human activity on hydrology. ship for many graduate students. It would also serve as a solid reference for researchers involved in The next section, titled "Palaeohydrology of the paleohydrology, paleoclimatology, and paleolim- Majo r Zones of Earth's Surface," contains five chapters . These largely describe modern and nology, or to those with incipient or burgeoning paleohydrological conditions over the past 20 000 interest in these subjects.—Steven W. Leavitt. year s for the humid tropics, arid and semi-arid regions, the temperate zone, and polar and subpo- Steven W. Leavitt is a professor at the Laboratory lar regions. The final "Conclusion" section contains of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona, a chapter on relevant paleoenvironmental databases Tucson, Arizona. • Editor's Note: The following response form appeared in the 1948 Bulletin, querying AMS members about the new publication Weatherwise, membership dues, and the Bulletin. Dear Member: You have now received the first three issues of Weatherwise gratis. We should like to have your reaction to the fol- lowing questions regarding Weatherwise and the AMS Bulletin: 1. Would you like to continue receiving Weatherwise regularly? Yes • No • 2. If so would you be willing to have your dues increased by $1.50/annum? Professional Members Yes • No Members Yes • No 3. Are you satisfied in general with the present scope and content of the Bulletin ? Yes • No • If not, please send us your ideas. Any other comments or suggestions on the above mentioned publications will be welcomed. Harry Wexler, Acting Chairman, Publications Committee. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 29, 204. 66 6 Vol. 79 , No. 4 , April 1998 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-79.4.666
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Abstract

Paleoclimate (paleoprecipitation) clearly serves as includin g a new GLOCOPH database and a key facet of complete and accurate characteriza- a chapter on the aims for future GLOCOPH tion of paleohydrological regimes. The following research. six chapters are part of a section titled "The Back- Although this book purposely presents little unpub- ground of Global Palaeohydrology." This section lished original research, it hits the mark as a set of presents the various types of geological, biologi- extremely comprehensive review papers (chapters). It cal, and archaeological records that aid in hydro- serves as a rich resource for paleohydrology and all logical reconstruction, global climate conditions that of its ancillary fields, with each chapter abundantly are particularly important to hydrological change, referenced and illustrated. The text is uniformly well response of streams to changing climate, the im- written and the book is well edited. It would make an pac t of continental-scale ice sheets, lake-level excellent textbook for a graduate class or seminar on changes, and the historical and prehistorical effects paleohydrology, although the price might be a hard- of human activity on hydrology. ship for many graduate students. It would also serve as a solid reference for researchers involved in The next section, titled "Palaeohydrology of the paleohydrology, paleoclimatology, and paleolim- Majo r Zones of Earth's Surface," contains five chapters . These largely describe modern and nology, or to those with incipient or burgeoning paleohydrological conditions over the past 20 000 interest in these subjects.—Steven W. Leavitt. year s for the humid tropics, arid and semi-arid regions, the temperate zone, and polar and subpo- Steven W. Leavitt is a professor at the Laboratory lar regions. The final "Conclusion" section contains of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona, a chapter on relevant paleoenvironmental databases Tucson, Arizona. • Editor's Note: The following response form appeared in the 1948 Bulletin, querying AMS members about the new publication Weatherwise, membership dues, and the Bulletin. Dear Member: You have now received the first three issues of Weatherwise gratis. We should like to have your reaction to the fol- lowing questions regarding Weatherwise and the AMS Bulletin: 1. Would you like to continue receiving Weatherwise regularly? Yes • No • 2. If so would you be willing to have your dues increased by $1.50/annum? Professional Members Yes • No Members Yes • No 3. Are you satisfied in general with the present scope and content of the Bulletin ? Yes • No • If not, please send us your ideas. Any other comments or suggestions on the above mentioned publications will be welcomed. Harry Wexler, Acting Chairman, Publications Committee. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 29, 204. 66 6 Vol. 79 , No. 4 , April 1998

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 1, 1998

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