25 years ago . . .

25 years ago . . . Bulletin American Meteorological Society 6 7 1990. Together with the reports of IPCC Working rectorship of Joseph Smagorinsky. The scope of the Groups I (Science) and II (Impacts) it will form the laboratory's work has expanded to include investi- panel's first assessment report. This report will be gations of atmospheric and oceanic phenomena on submitted to the Second World Climate conference a wide range of scales. In 1968, the laboratory moved in Geneva, 12-22 November 1990. to Princeton and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Program (renamed in 1987 the Program in Atmo- Symposium held at Geophysical Fluid spheric and Oceanic Sciences) was established . The Dynamics Laboratory to Mark 20 Years first students entered the program in the fall of 1969. In the ensuing two decades, 39 Ph.D. students have of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences graduated, and entered the worldwide meteorological A symposium held 28-29 September 1989 at the and oceanographic research community. Princeton's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory marked the 20th anniversary of the university's grad- Many visitors joined the current and former faculty, uate and postdoctoral program in atmospheric and current students and postdocs, and other scientists at oceanic sciences. The program in atmospheric and Princeton and GFD L in an audience of approximately oceanic sciences is a collaborative effort between 100. Scientific presentations by alumni, papers rang- Princeton University and the National Atmospheric ing over observational, analytical, and numerical and Oceanic Administration's Geophysical Fluid Dy- modeling studies of a variety of geophysical phenom- namics Laboratory (GFDL). ena were presented. The symposium covered current research in the field and was an illustration of the GFD L began in Washington DC in 1955 with a extent of the program's influence on contemporary small group of scientists developing computer models meteorology and oceanography. • of the global atmospheric circulation under the di- Almost no station has escaped one or more crackups. At least ten persons, including six pilots, have lost their lives on the "weather 50 years ago. . hop" . Two of the passengers who were killed were official ob- servers, one army and the other navy; who were doubling either as radio operators or mechanics. At least one ground observer At a June 1939 meeting of the Society in Milwaukee, Arthur M. was seriously injured, walking into the propeller of a plane after Marks, Jr., of the U.S. Weather Bureau in Ely, had presented a paper mounting the instrument on the wing. There have been at least on "Reminiscences on 'APOB' Flights and Fliers." Excerpts from twenty-five crackups in which major damage to the plane was that paper were published in the January 1940 Bulletin. Following are suffered. In six of these the pilot, running into serious trouble, the first three paragraphs of those excerpts: jumpe d safely, the plane being totally wrecked. These accidents with the accompanying loss of lives and ships, form one of the Reminiscences on "APOB" Flights and Fliers main arguments, it is believed, for the substitution of radiosondes My remarks will be limited to airplane weather-observations in for airplane observations. continental United States. The investigation of temperature and humidity conditions in the air above the surface has been carried on in several ways up to the present, by kite, airplane, sounding balloon, and more recently, by the radiosonde. The use of the airplane for weather observations dates back to the World War, during which several experimental flights were made (Pensacola, 1917; San Diego, 1918). Later the Navy made many flights at Philadelphia, Norfolk, Lakehurst, Hawaii, Washington, Seattle, Penn State Acquires Weather Research Plane and from some ships. Early in 1928, in cooperation with the Army at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Md., the Weather Bureau first Through a grant of $68,000 from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, has attempted to sound the upper air by this method. The program acquired a Piper Comanche twin-engine plane to be used in its research for synoptic regular daily flights, however, is comparatively re- into the behavior of the atmosphere. The plane has been equipped with cent. In 1931, the Weather Bureau, by contract with four com- every modern navigational aid. Dr. Charles L. Hosier, professor and mercial flying organizations, expanded its program to include the head of the department, and his associates have installed meteorological inland section of the country, while in Nov., 1931, Massachusetts equipment that will enable them to measure and record pressure, tem- Inst, of Tech. began daily flights at Boston. At four o'clock, E.S.T. perature, humidity, wind speed, liquid water content of clouds, at- each morning since July 1,1931, regular synoptic flights have been mospheric turbulence, electrical potential gradient, and other weather made at a network of stations, comprising Army, Navy and Weather factors. The plane is also equipped for aerial photographs and infrared Bureau stations. measurements of surface temperatures. The number of these flights has increased and then decreased Dr. Hosier and his research colleagues have been studying weather in this brief period. The proof of progress in meteorological meth- modification in the Appalachian mountain region for the past five years. ods is demonstrated well by the fact that in a brief 8 years the In addition to seeding and sampling clouds by airplane, the team has infant industry, aviation, has been superseded in the gathering of conducted radar studies of the formation and dispersion of clouds from data by the embryonic industry of ultra-short-wave radio. The the valley floor and from the top of one of the local ridges, and have cost of each flight has varied from around $14 to about $33 at checked changes in the amplitude and period of lee waves by releasing different locations and to different heights, the required elevation hundreds of instrumented and radar-tracked balloons. having varied from 14,500 feet in 1931 to 16,500 feet at present. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

25 years ago . . .

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/ams/25-years-ago-yb9Qvw5G5a
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-71.1.67a
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bulletin American Meteorological Society 6 7 1990. Together with the reports of IPCC Working rectorship of Joseph Smagorinsky. The scope of the Groups I (Science) and II (Impacts) it will form the laboratory's work has expanded to include investi- panel's first assessment report. This report will be gations of atmospheric and oceanic phenomena on submitted to the Second World Climate conference a wide range of scales. In 1968, the laboratory moved in Geneva, 12-22 November 1990. to Princeton and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Program (renamed in 1987 the Program in Atmo- Symposium held at Geophysical Fluid spheric and Oceanic Sciences) was established . The Dynamics Laboratory to Mark 20 Years first students entered the program in the fall of 1969. In the ensuing two decades, 39 Ph.D. students have of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences graduated, and entered the worldwide meteorological A symposium held 28-29 September 1989 at the and oceanographic research community. Princeton's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory marked the 20th anniversary of the university's grad- Many visitors joined the current and former faculty, uate and postdoctoral program in atmospheric and current students and postdocs, and other scientists at oceanic sciences. The program in atmospheric and Princeton and GFD L in an audience of approximately oceanic sciences is a collaborative effort between 100. Scientific presentations by alumni, papers rang- Princeton University and the National Atmospheric ing over observational, analytical, and numerical and Oceanic Administration's Geophysical Fluid Dy- modeling studies of a variety of geophysical phenom- namics Laboratory (GFDL). ena were presented. The symposium covered current research in the field and was an illustration of the GFD L began in Washington DC in 1955 with a extent of the program's influence on contemporary small group of scientists developing computer models meteorology and oceanography. • of the global atmospheric circulation under the di- Almost no station has escaped one or more crackups. At least ten persons, including six pilots, have lost their lives on the "weather 50 years ago. . hop" . Two of the passengers who were killed were official ob- servers, one army and the other navy; who were doubling either as radio operators or mechanics. At least one ground observer At a June 1939 meeting of the Society in Milwaukee, Arthur M. was seriously injured, walking into the propeller of a plane after Marks, Jr., of the U.S. Weather Bureau in Ely, had presented a paper mounting the instrument on the wing. There have been at least on "Reminiscences on 'APOB' Flights and Fliers." Excerpts from twenty-five crackups in which major damage to the plane was that paper were published in the January 1940 Bulletin. Following are suffered. In six of these the pilot, running into serious trouble, the first three paragraphs of those excerpts: jumpe d safely, the plane being totally wrecked. These accidents with the accompanying loss of lives and ships, form one of the Reminiscences on "APOB" Flights and Fliers main arguments, it is believed, for the substitution of radiosondes My remarks will be limited to airplane weather-observations in for airplane observations. continental United States. The investigation of temperature and humidity conditions in the air above the surface has been carried on in several ways up to the present, by kite, airplane, sounding balloon, and more recently, by the radiosonde. The use of the airplane for weather observations dates back to the World War, during which several experimental flights were made (Pensacola, 1917; San Diego, 1918). Later the Navy made many flights at Philadelphia, Norfolk, Lakehurst, Hawaii, Washington, Seattle, Penn State Acquires Weather Research Plane and from some ships. Early in 1928, in cooperation with the Army at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Md., the Weather Bureau first Through a grant of $68,000 from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, has attempted to sound the upper air by this method. The program acquired a Piper Comanche twin-engine plane to be used in its research for synoptic regular daily flights, however, is comparatively re- into the behavior of the atmosphere. The plane has been equipped with cent. In 1931, the Weather Bureau, by contract with four com- every modern navigational aid. Dr. Charles L. Hosier, professor and mercial flying organizations, expanded its program to include the head of the department, and his associates have installed meteorological inland section of the country, while in Nov., 1931, Massachusetts equipment that will enable them to measure and record pressure, tem- Inst, of Tech. began daily flights at Boston. At four o'clock, E.S.T. perature, humidity, wind speed, liquid water content of clouds, at- each morning since July 1,1931, regular synoptic flights have been mospheric turbulence, electrical potential gradient, and other weather made at a network of stations, comprising Army, Navy and Weather factors. The plane is also equipped for aerial photographs and infrared Bureau stations. measurements of surface temperatures. The number of these flights has increased and then decreased Dr. Hosier and his research colleagues have been studying weather in this brief period. The proof of progress in meteorological meth- modification in the Appalachian mountain region for the past five years. ods is demonstrated well by the fact that in a brief 8 years the In addition to seeding and sampling clouds by airplane, the team has infant industry, aviation, has been superseded in the gathering of conducted radar studies of the formation and dispersion of clouds from data by the embryonic industry of ultra-short-wave radio. The the valley floor and from the top of one of the local ridges, and have cost of each flight has varied from around $14 to about $33 at checked changes in the amplitude and period of lee waves by releasing different locations and to different heights, the required elevation hundreds of instrumented and radar-tracked balloons. having varied from 14,500 feet in 1931 to 16,500 feet at present.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1990

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off