25 Years Ago

25 Years Ago Forme r Bulletin Editor Retires fro m AWS Robert G. Stone, editor of the Bul- letin of the American Meteorological Society from 1935 to 1955, retired from his position as chief of Techni- cal Files for Aerospace Services, Headquarters Air Weather Service, on 31 May 1971, after nearly 28 years of service. His interests in meteorology extended from observing to forecasting and research, and from publications to teaching. In 1956 he was awarded the Charles Franklin Brooks Award for Outstanding Services to the Soci- ety (then known as the Award for Outstanding Ser- vices to the Society) "for his many years of faithful Col. Douglas C. Purdy, Chief of Staff, Hq. Air Weather editorship of the Bulletin of the American Meteoro- Service, presents Robert G. Stone with a certificate of service honoring his retirement as Chief of Technical Files for Aerospace logical Society and his active participation in commit- Services, for almost 28 years of service. (USAF photo). tee and council work." Stone began his meteorological career in 1933 exhaustive bibliography for synoptic meteorologists when he became assistant observer at the Mount which was later incorporated into Jerome Namias's Washington Observatory in New Hampshire and was book Air Mass and Isentropic Analysis. Stone left promoted to observer the next year. During his ten- Blue Hill in 1939 to joi n the School of Tropical Medi- ure at the observatory, he recorded two rare atmo- cine in Puerto Rico. Some of his experiences there spheric phenomena. The first of these was an unusual were later included in his book The Climate of the halo of 24°30' radius recorded during the fall of 1933, Virgin Islands. In 1940 he went to New York Univer- and the second occurred during the great storm of 11- sity as a research associate. 12 April 1934, when the observatory's anemometers recorded wind speeds of 231 mph—a world record at By 1944 Stone was a research assistant in the Re- the time. search Section of the Weather Division of the Army Air Force under the late Dr. Harry Wexler. He trans- In 1935 he began working at the Blue Hill Obser- ferred fro m there to the Scientific Services Section of vatory in Milton, Mass., where he was research as- the Air Weather Service in 1948, where he remained sistant under the late Charles Franklin Brooks (see until his retirement, overseeing the editing and publi- Bulletin, 51, 608-610). During this time he was as- cation of technical documents and the management sistant secretary of the AMS, served on the Interna- of the Headquarters Air Weather Service Library. tional Union of Geodesy and Geophysics Committee on Snow and Ice, edited the biometeorological sec- tion of Bibliographical Abstracts, and compiled an Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 52, 967 The kick off meeting for the 1996/97 year included A new chapter logo was unveiled, which was sent to various presentations of members' experiences over AMS Headquarters for approval. A copy of the logo the summer. These included videos of the AMS broad- will appear in upcoming UNCA news. cast conference in Boston; storm chasing of Hurricane The itinerary for the fall includes various fund rais- Berth a on the Carolina coast; broadcasts from a ers and the following speakers: John Griffiths of Texas student's internship at WHKY , a local cable TV sta- A& M University in October, Paul Jamason of the National Climatic Data Center in November, and tion in nearby Hickory, North Carolina; and a surprise Rodne y Hinson of the GSP-NWS in December. tape of our own "Doc" Ed Brotak doing the TV —Henry Reges. • weather 10 years ago. Many new students attended. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 2335 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

25 Years Ago

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American Meteorological Society
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10.1175/1520-0477-77.10.2357
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Abstract

Forme r Bulletin Editor Retires fro m AWS Robert G. Stone, editor of the Bul- letin of the American Meteorological Society from 1935 to 1955, retired from his position as chief of Techni- cal Files for Aerospace Services, Headquarters Air Weather Service, on 31 May 1971, after nearly 28 years of service. His interests in meteorology extended from observing to forecasting and research, and from publications to teaching. In 1956 he was awarded the Charles Franklin Brooks Award for Outstanding Services to the Soci- ety (then known as the Award for Outstanding Ser- vices to the Society) "for his many years of faithful Col. Douglas C. Purdy, Chief of Staff, Hq. Air Weather editorship of the Bulletin of the American Meteoro- Service, presents Robert G. Stone with a certificate of service honoring his retirement as Chief of Technical Files for Aerospace logical Society and his active participation in commit- Services, for almost 28 years of service. (USAF photo). tee and council work." Stone began his meteorological career in 1933 exhaustive bibliography for synoptic meteorologists when he became assistant observer at the Mount which was later incorporated into Jerome Namias's Washington Observatory in New Hampshire and was book Air Mass and Isentropic Analysis. Stone left promoted to observer the next year. During his ten- Blue Hill in 1939 to joi n the School of Tropical Medi- ure at the observatory, he recorded two rare atmo- cine in Puerto Rico. Some of his experiences there spheric phenomena. The first of these was an unusual were later included in his book The Climate of the halo of 24°30' radius recorded during the fall of 1933, Virgin Islands. In 1940 he went to New York Univer- and the second occurred during the great storm of 11- sity as a research associate. 12 April 1934, when the observatory's anemometers recorded wind speeds of 231 mph—a world record at By 1944 Stone was a research assistant in the Re- the time. search Section of the Weather Division of the Army Air Force under the late Dr. Harry Wexler. He trans- In 1935 he began working at the Blue Hill Obser- ferred fro m there to the Scientific Services Section of vatory in Milton, Mass., where he was research as- the Air Weather Service in 1948, where he remained sistant under the late Charles Franklin Brooks (see until his retirement, overseeing the editing and publi- Bulletin, 51, 608-610). During this time he was as- cation of technical documents and the management sistant secretary of the AMS, served on the Interna- of the Headquarters Air Weather Service Library. tional Union of Geodesy and Geophysics Committee on Snow and Ice, edited the biometeorological sec- tion of Bibliographical Abstracts, and compiled an Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 52, 967 The kick off meeting for the 1996/97 year included A new chapter logo was unveiled, which was sent to various presentations of members' experiences over AMS Headquarters for approval. A copy of the logo the summer. These included videos of the AMS broad- will appear in upcoming UNCA news. cast conference in Boston; storm chasing of Hurricane The itinerary for the fall includes various fund rais- Berth a on the Carolina coast; broadcasts from a ers and the following speakers: John Griffiths of Texas student's internship at WHKY , a local cable TV sta- A& M University in October, Paul Jamason of the National Climatic Data Center in November, and tion in nearby Hickory, North Carolina; and a surprise Rodne y Hinson of the GSP-NWS in December. tape of our own "Doc" Ed Brotak doing the TV —Henry Reges. • weather 10 years ago. Many new students attended. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 2335

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 1, 1996

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