25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO In January 2000, The Weather Channel established Associate d Press. The the John R. Hope Scholarship in Atmospheric Sci- award, handed out in May ences, which is administered by AMS. The annual o f this year, included scholarship honors Hope for his lifelong achievements thes e comments by the and excellence in preparing and aiding the public in judges: "Very nice deliv- dealing with the potential devastation of tropical systems. ery. Morano is engaging and easy to understand. Hope has received many public service awards, in- Flow of his weathercast is cluding the 1971 U.S. Department of Commerce Silver logical. Nice use of video. Medal, the National Hurricane conference Media Award Easy to watch. He does in 1990, and 1994 Governor's Award from the Florida wel l with monster Governor's Hurricane Conference. He served as chair of graphics." the Forecasts and Warning Committee of the Hurricane Warning Conference from 1972 to 1981. Hope began his Morano , an AMS career in 1941 as a forecaster in the Army Air Corps. sealholder, has been with WPGH-TV for the last 18 months. Prior to Pittsburgh, Mat t Morano, chief meteorologist at WPGH-TV he was chief meteorologist for NewsChannel 8 in Fox 53 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was named "Best Springfield, Virginia, which is the 24-hour all-news cable Weathercaster in Pennsylvania" by the Pennsylvania station for the greater Washington, D.C., area. • Project DUSTORM Yields Hail Harvest Samples of hailstones from seven states were obtained by the National Center for Atmospheric Research during the month-long span of Project DUSTORM, an experi- ment designed to investigate the role played by airborne dust in influencing the sever- ity of hailstorms and tornadoes in the midwestern United States (see BULLETIN, 56,613) . Three major storms were observed during the DUSTOR M field program, which ran from 7 April to 4 May. A dust storm on 27 April carried such large quantities of dust into the atmosphere that satellite photographs taken that day clearly reveal the motions of the airborne dust. Dr. Edwin Danielsen, coordinator of DUSTORM , observed that the heavy burden of dust appears to have suppressed the formation of tornadoes from that storm system. An earlier storm on 23 April, carrying less dust, produced baseball-sized hailstones in northern Missouri and some damaging tornadoes on route roughly from St. Joseph to Hannibal, Mo. Information from this storm will be compared with one that moved through the southern part of Missouri. Each storm showed very different hail growth patterns, one storm producing baseball-sized stones and the other yielding unusual dagger-shaped hail. [ . . . ] Preliminary observations point to a relationship between the formation of severe storms, hail- storms, and tornadoes. Danielson speculated, "Those storms which picked up only small amounts of dust appear to be those which produced the biggest tornadoes. Those storms with a heavier burden of dust did not. Perhaps great quantities of dust, by 'overseeding' severe stroms, suppress the formation of tornadoes." Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 56, 918. 198 7 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-81.8.1959
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Abstract

In January 2000, The Weather Channel established Associate d Press. The the John R. Hope Scholarship in Atmospheric Sci- award, handed out in May ences, which is administered by AMS. The annual o f this year, included scholarship honors Hope for his lifelong achievements thes e comments by the and excellence in preparing and aiding the public in judges: "Very nice deliv- dealing with the potential devastation of tropical systems. ery. Morano is engaging and easy to understand. Hope has received many public service awards, in- Flow of his weathercast is cluding the 1971 U.S. Department of Commerce Silver logical. Nice use of video. Medal, the National Hurricane conference Media Award Easy to watch. He does in 1990, and 1994 Governor's Award from the Florida wel l with monster Governor's Hurricane Conference. He served as chair of graphics." the Forecasts and Warning Committee of the Hurricane Warning Conference from 1972 to 1981. Hope began his Morano , an AMS career in 1941 as a forecaster in the Army Air Corps. sealholder, has been with WPGH-TV for the last 18 months. Prior to Pittsburgh, Mat t Morano, chief meteorologist at WPGH-TV he was chief meteorologist for NewsChannel 8 in Fox 53 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was named "Best Springfield, Virginia, which is the 24-hour all-news cable Weathercaster in Pennsylvania" by the Pennsylvania station for the greater Washington, D.C., area. • Project DUSTORM Yields Hail Harvest Samples of hailstones from seven states were obtained by the National Center for Atmospheric Research during the month-long span of Project DUSTORM, an experi- ment designed to investigate the role played by airborne dust in influencing the sever- ity of hailstorms and tornadoes in the midwestern United States (see BULLETIN, 56,613) . Three major storms were observed during the DUSTOR M field program, which ran from 7 April to 4 May. A dust storm on 27 April carried such large quantities of dust into the atmosphere that satellite photographs taken that day clearly reveal the motions of the airborne dust. Dr. Edwin Danielsen, coordinator of DUSTORM , observed that the heavy burden of dust appears to have suppressed the formation of tornadoes from that storm system. An earlier storm on 23 April, carrying less dust, produced baseball-sized hailstones in northern Missouri and some damaging tornadoes on route roughly from St. Joseph to Hannibal, Mo. Information from this storm will be compared with one that moved through the southern part of Missouri. Each storm showed very different hail growth patterns, one storm producing baseball-sized stones and the other yielding unusual dagger-shaped hail. [ . . . ] Preliminary observations point to a relationship between the formation of severe storms, hail- storms, and tornadoes. Danielson speculated, "Those storms which picked up only small amounts of dust appear to be those which produced the biggest tornadoes. Those storms with a heavier burden of dust did not. Perhaps great quantities of dust, by 'overseeding' severe stroms, suppress the formation of tornadoes." Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 56, 918. 198 7 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Aug 1, 2000

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