25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO ported by the Departments of Commerce, Transpor- eral large hailstones smashed into the front windshield tation, and Defense. He stated that it is responsible over the course of several minutes. Prentice presented for providing life cycle support for all aspects of the a combination of slides, videos, and time-lapse vid- operation of about 164 radars worldwide, with the eos of storms and tornadoes to the accompaniment support ranging from hardware and software main- of background music. Jim Ladue and Daphne Zaras tenance to training to providing real-time trouble showed severe storms and tornadoes from New York, shooting to developing new hardware and software. Colorado, and Oklahoma. The program concluded with Dave Blanchard showing videos of tornadoes Carr introduced Greg Hanson, who, with the as- in Wyoming, Colorado, and Nebraska. sistance of Bobby Prentice, organized the Storm Slide/ Video Fest. The first presente r was Bob Lee, who showed The chapter's Web site is located at http:// slides of comet Hale-Bopp. Roger Edwards pre- www.nssl.noaa.gov/cocams.—Rodger A. Brown. sented videos that he, Rich Thompson, and Jim Puget Sound Leonard took of 1991 tornadoes in Kansas and Okla- The chapter dispensed with its monthly meeting for homa. Dave Floyd showed videos of severe storms February 1997 in order to cohost, along with the Uni- and tornadoes that he took in Wyoming, Minnesota, versity of Washington and the Seattle National South Dakota, and Texas. Arthur Witt presented a Weather Service Forecast Office, the annual Pacific video showing what it was like to be in a car as sev- Northwest Weather Workshop. The two-day event, held at the NOAA Sandpoint facility on 21 and 22 Deep Sea Drilling Project Extended February 1997, attracted approximately 140 attendees from Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. The The National Science Foundation and Scripps workshop featured 32 presentations on a wide variety Institution of Oceanography have completed ar- of topics, including the eastern Washington ice storm rangements for a three-year extension of the of November 1996, the 26-29 December 1996 snow Deep Sea Drilling Project. and ice storms in western Washington and British Co- DSDP is aimed primarily at lumbia, air quality, regional radar applications, local probing the sediments on the windstorms, Internet access to weather data, regional ocean floor in order to learn numerical modeling, mesoscale circulations, results of more about the history and ori- the CAST II Field Experiment near the Washington gins of the ocean basins and the coast in December 1995, and recent climate studies. continents and the processes There also was a panel discussion on the value of lo- that have led to their formation cal real-time numerical weather forecasting. Follow- and modification. ing the first day of presentations, 48 people attended Research acquired through the DSDP has the workshop banquet, at which Mark Coates, man- helped change the generally accepted descrip- ager of airfield operations at Seattle-Tacoma Interna- tion of the earth from that of a static globe un- tional Airport, spoke on the impact of snowfall on air- dergoing relatively little change to the now ac- port operations. cepted description of a dynamic sphere marked On 20 March, 15 area meteorologists attended the by constantly spreading sea floors, forming and chapter's third meeting of the season. Announcements shrinking oceans, drifting continents, and shift- included plans on the chapter banquet and nomina- ing ocean currents. The three-year extension fol- tions for the 1997/98 chapter officers. lows an 18-month first phase and a 30-month Tony Basabe from Huxley College at Western second phase of the project, which is managed Washington University in Bellingham gave a presen- by Scripps, under contract to NSF. The oceano- tation entitled "Acid Rain versus Acid Fog." Basabe graphic vessel and drilling ship Glomar Chal- discussed preliminary results from a recent field ex- lenger will probe the ocean floor beneath arctic periment in the Cascade Mountains near Stampede and antarctic waters for the first time during the Pass, where both rainwater and cloud water (from fog) third phase of DSDP. were collected. Basabe explained that to collect cloud water inflatable pools were placed around the bases of various types of pine and fir trees. Usually within Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 53, 575. an hour after fog began to form, dew, which collected Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1215 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

ported by the Departments of Commerce, Transpor- eral large hailstones smashed into the front windshield tation, and Defense. He stated that it is responsible over the course of several minutes. Prentice presented for providing life cycle support for all aspects of the a combination of slides, videos, and time-lapse vid- operation of about 164 radars worldwide, with the eos of storms and tornadoes to the accompaniment support ranging from hardware and software main- of background music. Jim Ladue and Daphne Zaras tenance to training to providing real-time trouble showed severe storms and tornadoes from New York, shooting to developing new hardware and software. Colorado, and Oklahoma. The program concluded with Dave Blanchard showing videos of tornadoes Carr introduced Greg Hanson, who, with the as- in Wyoming, Colorado, and Nebraska. sistance of Bobby Prentice, organized the Storm Slide/ Video Fest. The first presente r was Bob Lee, who showed The chapter's Web site is located at http:// slides of comet Hale-Bopp. Roger Edwards pre- www.nssl.noaa.gov/cocams.—Rodger A. Brown. sented videos that he, Rich Thompson, and Jim Puget Sound Leonard took of 1991 tornadoes in Kansas and Okla- The chapter dispensed with its monthly meeting for homa. Dave Floyd showed videos of severe storms February 1997 in order to cohost, along with the Uni- and tornadoes that he took in Wyoming, Minnesota, versity of Washington and the Seattle National South Dakota, and Texas. Arthur Witt presented a Weather Service Forecast Office, the annual Pacific video showing what it was like to be in a car as sev- Northwest Weather Workshop. The two-day event, held at the NOAA Sandpoint facility on 21 and 22 Deep Sea Drilling Project Extended February 1997, attracted approximately 140 attendees from Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. The The National Science Foundation and Scripps workshop featured 32 presentations on a wide variety Institution of Oceanography have completed ar- of topics, including the eastern Washington ice storm rangements for a three-year extension of the of November 1996, the 26-29 December 1996 snow Deep Sea Drilling Project. and ice storms in western Washington and British Co- DSDP is aimed primarily at lumbia, air quality, regional radar applications, local probing the sediments on the windstorms, Internet access to weather data, regional ocean floor in order to learn numerical modeling, mesoscale circulations, results of more about the history and ori- the CAST II Field Experiment near the Washington gins of the ocean basins and the coast in December 1995, and recent climate studies. continents and the processes There also was a panel discussion on the value of lo- that have led to their formation cal real-time numerical weather forecasting. Follow- and modification. ing the first day of presentations, 48 people attended Research acquired through the DSDP has the workshop banquet, at which Mark Coates, man- helped change the generally accepted descrip- ager of airfield operations at Seattle-Tacoma Interna- tion of the earth from that of a static globe un- tional Airport, spoke on the impact of snowfall on air- dergoing relatively little change to the now ac- port operations. cepted description of a dynamic sphere marked On 20 March, 15 area meteorologists attended the by constantly spreading sea floors, forming and chapter's third meeting of the season. Announcements shrinking oceans, drifting continents, and shift- included plans on the chapter banquet and nomina- ing ocean currents. The three-year extension fol- tions for the 1997/98 chapter officers. lows an 18-month first phase and a 30-month Tony Basabe from Huxley College at Western second phase of the project, which is managed Washington University in Bellingham gave a presen- by Scripps, under contract to NSF. The oceano- tation entitled "Acid Rain versus Acid Fog." Basabe graphic vessel and drilling ship Glomar Chal- discussed preliminary results from a recent field ex- lenger will probe the ocean floor beneath arctic periment in the Cascade Mountains near Stampede and antarctic waters for the first time during the Pass, where both rainwater and cloud water (from fog) third phase of DSDP. were collected. Basabe explained that to collect cloud water inflatable pools were placed around the bases of various types of pine and fir trees. Usually within Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 53, 575. an hour after fog began to form, dew, which collected Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1215

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jun 1, 1997

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