25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO ernment weather service dedicated to civilian needs "earned, and retained, the confidence of Allied transformed almost overnight into a military orga- operational commanders and of associated Allied nization that became an integral part of Australia's weather organizations." Haldane's look at that war machine on land, sea, and in the air. In his fi- organization is an important contribution to the his- nal report of the war, the chief of the RAAF air staff tory of meteorology in Australia.—John F. Fuller. wrote that the RAAF Meteorological Service (See credentials p. 1116) • Gorrell Award Presented to Airline Meteorologists YEAR S Henry T. Harrison, former AG O Vice President of the Ameri- can Meteorological Society, and Arthur F. Merewether, former President of the AMS, were presented with the 1973 Gorrell Award of the Air Transport As- sociation on 18 April. Named for the late Col. Edgar S. Gorrell, founder and first president of the ATA from 1936-45, the Gorrell Award is presented "for outstanding contributions toward the improvement of weather analysis, weather forecasting, or the dispatching of airline aircraft, thereby enhancing the reliability and safety of Henry T. Harrison (2nd from right) and Arthur F. air transportation." Merewether (3rd from right) receive the 1973 Edgar S. Gorrell Award from ATA President Paul R. Ignatius (2nd from left). Henry T. Harrison, who participated in the first Also present to honor recipients are Paul W. Kadlec (left), Byrd Expedition to Antarctica in 1928 as a mem- Manager of Meteorology for Continental Air Lines and Chairman ber of the U.S. Weather Bureau, was with the of the ATA Meteorological Committee, and Dr. Robert M. White United Air Lines for three decades, from 1935— (right), Adminstrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric 65, and served as UAL's Director of Meteorol- Administration. ogy from 1954-65. This award recognizes his innovative work in developing clear air turbu- lence forecasting techniques at the beginning of for the American Airline System, where he the jet age in 1958, and for his identification of served as Manager of Weather Services from meteorological conditions that produce turbulent 1946-66. waves in the atmosphere in mountainous regions. Both Merewether and Harrison have provided Harrison was also a pioneer in the use of weather leadership to the air transport industry in the so- modification to open up in fogged-in airports to lution of meteorological problems while serving permit aircraft operations. on several occasions as Chairman of the ATA Arthur F. Merewether, who was Chief of the Meteorological Committees. U.S. Army Air Corps weather service at the be- ginning of World War II, received the Gorrell Award in recognition of his pioneering work in Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 54,558. developing and using computer flight planning Bulletin of the American AMeteorological Society 1119 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

ernment weather service dedicated to civilian needs "earned, and retained, the confidence of Allied transformed almost overnight into a military orga- operational commanders and of associated Allied nization that became an integral part of Australia's weather organizations." Haldane's look at that war machine on land, sea, and in the air. In his fi- organization is an important contribution to the his- nal report of the war, the chief of the RAAF air staff tory of meteorology in Australia.—John F. Fuller. wrote that the RAAF Meteorological Service (See credentials p. 1116) • Gorrell Award Presented to Airline Meteorologists YEAR S Henry T. Harrison, former AG O Vice President of the Ameri- can Meteorological Society, and Arthur F. Merewether, former President of the AMS, were presented with the 1973 Gorrell Award of the Air Transport As- sociation on 18 April. Named for the late Col. Edgar S. Gorrell, founder and first president of the ATA from 1936-45, the Gorrell Award is presented "for outstanding contributions toward the improvement of weather analysis, weather forecasting, or the dispatching of airline aircraft, thereby enhancing the reliability and safety of Henry T. Harrison (2nd from right) and Arthur F. air transportation." Merewether (3rd from right) receive the 1973 Edgar S. Gorrell Award from ATA President Paul R. Ignatius (2nd from left). Henry T. Harrison, who participated in the first Also present to honor recipients are Paul W. Kadlec (left), Byrd Expedition to Antarctica in 1928 as a mem- Manager of Meteorology for Continental Air Lines and Chairman ber of the U.S. Weather Bureau, was with the of the ATA Meteorological Committee, and Dr. Robert M. White United Air Lines for three decades, from 1935— (right), Adminstrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric 65, and served as UAL's Director of Meteorol- Administration. ogy from 1954-65. This award recognizes his innovative work in developing clear air turbu- lence forecasting techniques at the beginning of for the American Airline System, where he the jet age in 1958, and for his identification of served as Manager of Weather Services from meteorological conditions that produce turbulent 1946-66. waves in the atmosphere in mountainous regions. Both Merewether and Harrison have provided Harrison was also a pioneer in the use of weather leadership to the air transport industry in the so- modification to open up in fogged-in airports to lution of meteorological problems while serving permit aircraft operations. on several occasions as Chairman of the ATA Arthur F. Merewether, who was Chief of the Meteorological Committees. U.S. Army Air Corps weather service at the be- ginning of World War II, received the Gorrell Award in recognition of his pioneering work in Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 54,558. developing and using computer flight planning Bulletin of the American AMeteorological Society 1119

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jun 1, 1998

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