25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO director of Weather Services at WMC. He showed Mintz mentioned that the rising cost of newsprint and chapter members the vast array of radar and meteo- other economi c factors have resulted in a reduction in rological displays used to depict current weather con- the spac e allocated to th e weathe r ma p an d forecasts. ditions in the Channel 5 viewing area. The newest Severa l attendees at the meeting questioned equipmen t is an Enterprise Doppler radar that shows whethe r or not newspapers , and specif\ca\\y Newsday, storm intensity, velocity, and turbulence. This new had the obligation to report the statistics associated technolog y is used to accurately pinpoint potentially with large storms, extreme temperatures, and other hazardou s thunderstorm echoes. By using a projec- noteworthy weather events for a historical archive. tion of the current storm location, Channel 5 is able to Th e current philosophy at th e paper regards reporting provide viewers in the path of hazardous weather an the potential threat of hurricanes, northeasters, and accurate representation of th e arrival tim e of th e storm other severe weather for its local are a more important in their area of concern. Severe storm circulations tha n reporting the statistics associated with the actual associate d with the 9 June and 27 November 1994 event—if it does not result in a major economic tornadoe s were clearly identifiable on this radar. disruption. McClain also discussed the other meteorological Mintz discussed that the lead time required to equipmen t at the station: a lightning display, graphics report on the threat of impending severe weather at display, National Oceanic Atmospheric Administra- tion (NOAA) weather wire, and Insta Alert display. He explained that the lightning display show s current and previous cloud-to-ground lightning strikes from the National Lightning Detection Network. It has proven quite useful in determining storm intensity and move- Th e 50th Anniversary Medal (1919-1969) was ment. Th e graphics display is use d to overlay all of the presente d to the following members of the American weathe r data onto one common display, while the Meteorological Society, wh o are also members of the NOA A weather wire is used to archive meteorological National Academy of Sciences or the National Acad- information such as public forecast s an d hourly condi- em y of Engineering: tions for all U.S. reporting stations. The final display, Insta Alert, is used to quickly disseminate severe Abbot, Charles Greeley thunderstorm/tornad o watches and warnings to the Bjerknes, Jacob viewing public. Thes e alerts are automatically entered Book, Henry George into the syste m for immediate transmission. Th e flash Byers, Horace Robert flood warning s have to be manually entered in orde r to Chapman , Sydney be disseminated. Charney , Jule Gregory Th e meeting concluded with an informal tour of the Gordon , William Edwin entire Channel 5 studio.—Mar k A. Isaminger. Haurwitz, Bernhard Kaplan, Joseph Ne w York City/Long Island Kolmogorov , Andrej N. Th e 27 February 1995 meeting was cosponsored Landsberg, Helmut Erich by the Long Island Weather Observers. The meeting MacDonald , Gordon James Fraser wa s held at Nassau Community College. The guest Malone, Thomas Francis speaker was Phil Mintz, reporter from Newsday's Munk, Walter Heinrich Melville, Long Island, office. Mintz's presentation was Reichelderfer, Francis Wilton entitled, "Reporting the Weather: A Journalist's Per- Silver, Samuel spective." Mintz explained that as a staff reporter he is Squires, Samuel assigne d to cover stories involving all aspects of the Suomi , Verner weather, such as the severe winter of 1993/94, Hurri- cane Gloria, etc. In addition, he is also assigned to Taylor, Sir Geoffrey Ingram cover general news stories and issues involving the Went , Frits Warmolt local utilities and write for the science ("Discovery") Whipple , Fred Lawrence an d the student briefing sections of the newspaper. White, Robert Mayer Wulf, Oliver Reynolds Mintz provided an insider's view of wha t his editors consider newsworthy weather stories. He also con- trasted what special weather topics merit coverage versu s those that weather buffs and professional Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 51,429. meteorologists would like to have routinely reported. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

director of Weather Services at WMC. He showed Mintz mentioned that the rising cost of newsprint and chapter members the vast array of radar and meteo- other economi c factors have resulted in a reduction in rological displays used to depict current weather con- the spac e allocated to th e weathe r ma p an d forecasts. ditions in the Channel 5 viewing area. The newest Severa l attendees at the meeting questioned equipmen t is an Enterprise Doppler radar that shows whethe r or not newspapers , and specif\ca\\y Newsday, storm intensity, velocity, and turbulence. This new had the obligation to report the statistics associated technolog y is used to accurately pinpoint potentially with large storms, extreme temperatures, and other hazardou s thunderstorm echoes. By using a projec- noteworthy weather events for a historical archive. tion of the current storm location, Channel 5 is able to Th e current philosophy at th e paper regards reporting provide viewers in the path of hazardous weather an the potential threat of hurricanes, northeasters, and accurate representation of th e arrival tim e of th e storm other severe weather for its local are a more important in their area of concern. Severe storm circulations tha n reporting the statistics associated with the actual associate d with the 9 June and 27 November 1994 event—if it does not result in a major economic tornadoe s were clearly identifiable on this radar. disruption. McClain also discussed the other meteorological Mintz discussed that the lead time required to equipmen t at the station: a lightning display, graphics report on the threat of impending severe weather at display, National Oceanic Atmospheric Administra- tion (NOAA) weather wire, and Insta Alert display. He explained that the lightning display show s current and previous cloud-to-ground lightning strikes from the National Lightning Detection Network. It has proven quite useful in determining storm intensity and move- Th e 50th Anniversary Medal (1919-1969) was ment. Th e graphics display is use d to overlay all of the presente d to the following members of the American weathe r data onto one common display, while the Meteorological Society, wh o are also members of the NOA A weather wire is used to archive meteorological National Academy of Sciences or the National Acad- information such as public forecast s an d hourly condi- em y of Engineering: tions for all U.S. reporting stations. The final display, Insta Alert, is used to quickly disseminate severe Abbot, Charles Greeley thunderstorm/tornad o watches and warnings to the Bjerknes, Jacob viewing public. Thes e alerts are automatically entered Book, Henry George into the syste m for immediate transmission. Th e flash Byers, Horace Robert flood warning s have to be manually entered in orde r to Chapman , Sydney be disseminated. Charney , Jule Gregory Th e meeting concluded with an informal tour of the Gordon , William Edwin entire Channel 5 studio.—Mar k A. Isaminger. Haurwitz, Bernhard Kaplan, Joseph Ne w York City/Long Island Kolmogorov , Andrej N. Th e 27 February 1995 meeting was cosponsored Landsberg, Helmut Erich by the Long Island Weather Observers. The meeting MacDonald , Gordon James Fraser wa s held at Nassau Community College. The guest Malone, Thomas Francis speaker was Phil Mintz, reporter from Newsday's Munk, Walter Heinrich Melville, Long Island, office. Mintz's presentation was Reichelderfer, Francis Wilton entitled, "Reporting the Weather: A Journalist's Per- Silver, Samuel spective." Mintz explained that as a staff reporter he is Squires, Samuel assigne d to cover stories involving all aspects of the Suomi , Verner weather, such as the severe winter of 1993/94, Hurri- cane Gloria, etc. In addition, he is also assigned to Taylor, Sir Geoffrey Ingram cover general news stories and issues involving the Went , Frits Warmolt local utilities and write for the science ("Discovery") Whipple , Fred Lawrence an d the student briefing sections of the newspaper. White, Robert Mayer Wulf, Oliver Reynolds Mintz provided an insider's view of wha t his editors consider newsworthy weather stories. He also con- trasted what special weather topics merit coverage versu s those that weather buffs and professional Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 51,429. meteorologists would like to have routinely reported. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: May 1, 1995

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