25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO lending library, submitting chapter meeting minutes, hardworking local chapter student officers serving as election results, and much more. The importance of Annual Meeting volunteers with an opportunity to submitting chapter election results every year by 1 meet one-on-one with professionals working in vari- June was also discussed. Even if the election results ous aspects of the field. Students and mentors alike are the reappointment of the current officers, it is im- continue to greatly appreciate and enjoy this annual portant to let AMS Headquarters know so they do not activity. assume the chapter has become inactive. The AMS and the LCAC thank everyone for all the The last LCAC function during the Annual Meet- amazing work that numerous volunteers do on a year- ing was the fourth annual student-mentoring luncheon round basis via local chapter initiatives. Please watch held on 18 January. Approximately 25 students joined your mailboxes for mailings from AMS Headquarters 11 mentors and AMS staff representing various career during the coming year. They contain important infor- paths in the atmospheric sciences. The professionals mation including Local Chapter of the Year applica- in attendance were Bruce Thomas, Deirdre Kann, tions and information on all the activities to be held Robin Marshment, Bob Davis, David Homan, Ken during the 82nd AMS Annual Meeting. Next year Carey , Jenny Dean, Keith Seitter, and Wendy please either continue to participate or consider hav- Schreiber-Abshire. New AMS President Bob Serafin ing a representative of your chapter attend some or and President-Elect Rick Rosen also spent a portion all of these exciting activities during the Annual of the lunch meeting visiting with student attendees. Meetin g in Orlando. See you there.—Wendy The purpose of the annual luncheon is to provide the Schreiber-Abshire. • The first microwave measurements of carbon monoxide in the upper at- mospheres of Earth, Venus, and Mars have been made by space scientists from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Aerospace Corporation of El Segundo, California [ . . . ] The finding seems to establish CO as a common denominator in the upper atmospheres of the planets, provides new data on the basic physics governing general planetary atmospheric processes, and should lead to a better understanding of the delicate balances in our own upper atmosphere. Microwave measurements made with ground-based radio telescopes disclosed that the rela- tive abundance of CO increases significantly between 50 and 80 km in Earth's atmosphere, and between 80 and 110 km altitude in the atmosphere of Venus. This was the first ground-based microwave observation of CO above 50 km in Earth's atmosphere, verifying previous photo- chemical calculations. [.. . ] Carbon monoxide at lower altitudes on Venus and Mars, as well as on Earth, had been previously measured by infrared techniques. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 57, 478. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 7 09 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-82.4.735
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Abstract

lending library, submitting chapter meeting minutes, hardworking local chapter student officers serving as election results, and much more. The importance of Annual Meeting volunteers with an opportunity to submitting chapter election results every year by 1 meet one-on-one with professionals working in vari- June was also discussed. Even if the election results ous aspects of the field. Students and mentors alike are the reappointment of the current officers, it is im- continue to greatly appreciate and enjoy this annual portant to let AMS Headquarters know so they do not activity. assume the chapter has become inactive. The AMS and the LCAC thank everyone for all the The last LCAC function during the Annual Meet- amazing work that numerous volunteers do on a year- ing was the fourth annual student-mentoring luncheon round basis via local chapter initiatives. Please watch held on 18 January. Approximately 25 students joined your mailboxes for mailings from AMS Headquarters 11 mentors and AMS staff representing various career during the coming year. They contain important infor- paths in the atmospheric sciences. The professionals mation including Local Chapter of the Year applica- in attendance were Bruce Thomas, Deirdre Kann, tions and information on all the activities to be held Robin Marshment, Bob Davis, David Homan, Ken during the 82nd AMS Annual Meeting. Next year Carey , Jenny Dean, Keith Seitter, and Wendy please either continue to participate or consider hav- Schreiber-Abshire. New AMS President Bob Serafin ing a representative of your chapter attend some or and President-Elect Rick Rosen also spent a portion all of these exciting activities during the Annual of the lunch meeting visiting with student attendees. Meetin g in Orlando. See you there.—Wendy The purpose of the annual luncheon is to provide the Schreiber-Abshire. • The first microwave measurements of carbon monoxide in the upper at- mospheres of Earth, Venus, and Mars have been made by space scientists from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Aerospace Corporation of El Segundo, California [ . . . ] The finding seems to establish CO as a common denominator in the upper atmospheres of the planets, provides new data on the basic physics governing general planetary atmospheric processes, and should lead to a better understanding of the delicate balances in our own upper atmosphere. Microwave measurements made with ground-based radio telescopes disclosed that the rela- tive abundance of CO increases significantly between 50 and 80 km in Earth's atmosphere, and between 80 and 110 km altitude in the atmosphere of Venus. This was the first ground-based microwave observation of CO above 50 km in Earth's atmosphere, verifying previous photo- chemical calculations. [.. . ] Carbon monoxide at lower altitudes on Venus and Mars, as well as on Earth, had been previously measured by infrared techniques. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 57, 478. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 7 09

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 1, 2001

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