25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO Editor's note: The "About our Members" feature of the August 1970 Bulletin included, among others, the following items: Jule Charney of MIT spoke at seminars on "The observability and predictability of global atmospheric systems" at Oregon State University on 23 and 24 April. These seminars were part of a special series marking the first year of the new Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the university. Thomas S. Moorman, superintendent of the Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, retired from the Air Force 1 August after more than 37 years of military service. For more than 20 years of a military career that began with graduation from West Point in 1933, Gen. Moorman was a weather officer. His commands have included the 2343 Air Wea. Wg., Tokyo, Japan; Air Weather Service; Hq. 13th Air Force; and vice commander in chief of Hq. Pacific Air Force, USAF. He received the master's degree in meteorology in 1938 from California Institute of Technology and did graduate work at Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology in 1941. He is representative to the Meteorological Committee of the NATO Standing Group, a Fellow of the AMS, a member of the Association of American Colleges and the National Education Associa- tion, and an active promoter of Scouting. He holds many military decorations, including the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit with two oak leaf clusters, and the Croix de Guerre with palm from Thomas S. Moorman France, Belgium, and Luxembourg. The general and his wife plan to stay in the Colorado Springs area at least temporarily and hope to become active in environmental studies. Walter Orr Roberts, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, was elected a trustee of the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies. The Institute offers an executive program which provides an intensive two-week series of daily seminars based on humanistic readings, and conferences for leaders in education and science. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 51,747-750. Williford also discussed the issues involved in features. It is able to show tropical cyclone character- forecasting tropical cyclone movement and intensifi- istics, such as the theta e minimum at 700 mb, and the structure of the vortex and its surroundings. cation. Steering currents are important and often allow climatology/persistence-based models to do well in More importantly, the model includes a physical track forecasts. Although dynamical model attempts initialization procedure (during data assimilation) to do sometimes capture the essence of cyclone changes, allow for proper environmental spinup (including tropi- the proper diagnosis of the initial environment, the cal cyclones) by day zero. Williford explained that this vortex structure, and the outflow of the storm are initialization procedure is accomplished by using re- crucial for these to be successful. Williford briefly verse algorithms consistent with the physics of the described the operational models used by National numerical model to match observed fields, such as Centers for Environmental Prediction and the Tropical outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and observed Prediction Center (formerly the National Hurricane rainfall, to model rainfall and mode-based OLR, sen- Center) and illustrated their relative skill. sible heat fluxes, and wind fields. This provides for a Following his presentation, Williford discussed a realistic tropical system that interacts with the sur- rounding model environment and improves longer- poster presentation on Tropical Storms Alberto and range forecasts. Good results have been shown in Beryl that he had presented at the 21 st Conference on tropical cyclone case studies using this technique. Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology in Miami, Florida, 1488 Vol. 76, No. 8, August 1995 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

Editor's note: The "About our Members" feature of the August 1970 Bulletin included, among others, the following items: Jule Charney of MIT spoke at seminars on "The observability and predictability of global atmospheric systems" at Oregon State University on 23 and 24 April. These seminars were part of a special series marking the first year of the new Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the university. Thomas S. Moorman, superintendent of the Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, retired from the Air Force 1 August after more than 37 years of military service. For more than 20 years of a military career that began with graduation from West Point in 1933, Gen. Moorman was a weather officer. His commands have included the 2343 Air Wea. Wg., Tokyo, Japan; Air Weather Service; Hq. 13th Air Force; and vice commander in chief of Hq. Pacific Air Force, USAF. He received the master's degree in meteorology in 1938 from California Institute of Technology and did graduate work at Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology in 1941. He is representative to the Meteorological Committee of the NATO Standing Group, a Fellow of the AMS, a member of the Association of American Colleges and the National Education Associa- tion, and an active promoter of Scouting. He holds many military decorations, including the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit with two oak leaf clusters, and the Croix de Guerre with palm from Thomas S. Moorman France, Belgium, and Luxembourg. The general and his wife plan to stay in the Colorado Springs area at least temporarily and hope to become active in environmental studies. Walter Orr Roberts, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, was elected a trustee of the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies. The Institute offers an executive program which provides an intensive two-week series of daily seminars based on humanistic readings, and conferences for leaders in education and science. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 51,747-750. Williford also discussed the issues involved in features. It is able to show tropical cyclone character- forecasting tropical cyclone movement and intensifi- istics, such as the theta e minimum at 700 mb, and the structure of the vortex and its surroundings. cation. Steering currents are important and often allow climatology/persistence-based models to do well in More importantly, the model includes a physical track forecasts. Although dynamical model attempts initialization procedure (during data assimilation) to do sometimes capture the essence of cyclone changes, allow for proper environmental spinup (including tropi- the proper diagnosis of the initial environment, the cal cyclones) by day zero. Williford explained that this vortex structure, and the outflow of the storm are initialization procedure is accomplished by using re- crucial for these to be successful. Williford briefly verse algorithms consistent with the physics of the described the operational models used by National numerical model to match observed fields, such as Centers for Environmental Prediction and the Tropical outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and observed Prediction Center (formerly the National Hurricane rainfall, to model rainfall and mode-based OLR, sen- Center) and illustrated their relative skill. sible heat fluxes, and wind fields. This provides for a Following his presentation, Williford discussed a realistic tropical system that interacts with the sur- rounding model environment and improves longer- poster presentation on Tropical Storms Alberto and range forecasts. Good results have been shown in Beryl that he had presented at the 21 st Conference on tropical cyclone case studies using this technique. Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology in Miami, Florida, 1488 Vol. 76, No. 8, August 1995

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Aug 1, 1995

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