25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO Ben Wood s joined the WSYX-T V Six On Your Side Station, which is on cable systems in Indianapolis and team as chief meteorologist on 6 February 1995. Fort Wayne, Indiana, and Dallas and Austin, Texas, Woods brings to the WSYX Columbus, Ohio, market provides local weather information using weather- not only years of meteorological experience but also a casts, weather radar, and automated weather sta- background that includes integrating weather into tions. local school systems as well as other commu- David Spiegler, president and founder of DBS nity organizations. Associates Inc., Arlington, Massachusetts, has been A graduate of Cook instrumental in forming a new division of DBS: the College, Rutgers Uni- DBS Consulting Group. The group is composed of a versity, and an AMS stable of scientists, engineers, and executives, many Television Seal of Ap- of whom are AMS CCMs. The group possesses an proval holder, Woods understanding of the government, military meteoro- was a meteorologist/ logical organizations, international weather services, weather service spe- and the commercial sector. Consultants will be in- cialist for the National volved in weather, climate, and environmental activi- Weather Service Fore- ties, while providing services tailored to a client's cast Office in Raleigh- specific needs. Durham, North Caro- DBS provides technical reports, proposals, and lina; a meteorologist/ strategic marketing plans for systems, projects, stud- environmental science ies, and programs; performs analyses or surveys or reporter for WPTV-TV, both of markets and requirements for systems, prod- Raleigh, North Carolina; and a weather anchor for ucts, and services; designs and develops computer- WVIT-TV, Hartford, Connecticut. Most recently he based weather and climate analysis and prediction was a meteorologist/reporter for WISH-TV, India- techniques; prepares weather and climate publica- napolis, Indiana, where he was responsible for the tions for the broadcast industry and the public; and development of the Local Weather Station: a 24-hour performs applied meteorological and climatological local cable all-weather channel. The Local Weather research and forensic meteorological services. • Keepin g Tabs on Hurricanes The most intensive hurricane watch in the history of the Weather Bureau is being kept this season with the help of a new computer program called HURRAN. Developing storms are followed by satellite and aircraft, and when the center of a hurricane is between 24 and 36 hr of possible landfall, HURRAN, the hurricane analogy technique, is mobilized. This program analyzes the behavior of all previous hurricanes located and moving in a manner similar to the one approaching the coast. HURRAN computes the sector of the coastline which historically has at least a 50-5 0 chance of being struck by winds and storm surge; and a hurricane watch is announced for the area. It is expected that watch times of up to 36 hr may be achieved by this technique. HURRAN is part of a new plan designed to improve warning times put into effect by the Weather Bureau 1 June. The plan involves the National Hurricane Center in Miami and the four other offices with hurricane warning responsibility in San Juan, New Orleans, Washington, and Boston. The predictions and warning decisions are based upon combinations of machine computations, satellite photo- graphs, aircraft reconnaissance data, radar, as well as exchange of professional opinion between chief forecasters at the Hurricane Center and the warning offices. This year for the first time the crews of reconnaissance planes are instructed to probe not only the center but also each of the four quadrants of the storm system. The instrumentation of the aircraft has been extended, and computers are performing analysis done manually before. With these improvements in its system, the Weather Bureau hopes to give warning times which include at least 12 full hours of daylight. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 51, 585. Vol. 76, No. 6, June 1995 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-76.6.976
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Abstract

Ben Wood s joined the WSYX-T V Six On Your Side Station, which is on cable systems in Indianapolis and team as chief meteorologist on 6 February 1995. Fort Wayne, Indiana, and Dallas and Austin, Texas, Woods brings to the WSYX Columbus, Ohio, market provides local weather information using weather- not only years of meteorological experience but also a casts, weather radar, and automated weather sta- background that includes integrating weather into tions. local school systems as well as other commu- David Spiegler, president and founder of DBS nity organizations. Associates Inc., Arlington, Massachusetts, has been A graduate of Cook instrumental in forming a new division of DBS: the College, Rutgers Uni- DBS Consulting Group. The group is composed of a versity, and an AMS stable of scientists, engineers, and executives, many Television Seal of Ap- of whom are AMS CCMs. The group possesses an proval holder, Woods understanding of the government, military meteoro- was a meteorologist/ logical organizations, international weather services, weather service spe- and the commercial sector. Consultants will be in- cialist for the National volved in weather, climate, and environmental activi- Weather Service Fore- ties, while providing services tailored to a client's cast Office in Raleigh- specific needs. Durham, North Caro- DBS provides technical reports, proposals, and lina; a meteorologist/ strategic marketing plans for systems, projects, stud- environmental science ies, and programs; performs analyses or surveys or reporter for WPTV-TV, both of markets and requirements for systems, prod- Raleigh, North Carolina; and a weather anchor for ucts, and services; designs and develops computer- WVIT-TV, Hartford, Connecticut. Most recently he based weather and climate analysis and prediction was a meteorologist/reporter for WISH-TV, India- techniques; prepares weather and climate publica- napolis, Indiana, where he was responsible for the tions for the broadcast industry and the public; and development of the Local Weather Station: a 24-hour performs applied meteorological and climatological local cable all-weather channel. The Local Weather research and forensic meteorological services. • Keepin g Tabs on Hurricanes The most intensive hurricane watch in the history of the Weather Bureau is being kept this season with the help of a new computer program called HURRAN. Developing storms are followed by satellite and aircraft, and when the center of a hurricane is between 24 and 36 hr of possible landfall, HURRAN, the hurricane analogy technique, is mobilized. This program analyzes the behavior of all previous hurricanes located and moving in a manner similar to the one approaching the coast. HURRAN computes the sector of the coastline which historically has at least a 50-5 0 chance of being struck by winds and storm surge; and a hurricane watch is announced for the area. It is expected that watch times of up to 36 hr may be achieved by this technique. HURRAN is part of a new plan designed to improve warning times put into effect by the Weather Bureau 1 June. The plan involves the National Hurricane Center in Miami and the four other offices with hurricane warning responsibility in San Juan, New Orleans, Washington, and Boston. The predictions and warning decisions are based upon combinations of machine computations, satellite photo- graphs, aircraft reconnaissance data, radar, as well as exchange of professional opinion between chief forecasters at the Hurricane Center and the warning offices. This year for the first time the crews of reconnaissance planes are instructed to probe not only the center but also each of the four quadrants of the storm system. The instrumentation of the aircraft has been extended, and computers are performing analysis done manually before. With these improvements in its system, the Weather Bureau hopes to give warning times which include at least 12 full hours of daylight. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 51, 585. Vol. 76, No. 6, June 1995

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jun 1, 1995

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