25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO mation the public really wants. Adams explained that felt fewer types of headlines with more detail in the it can vary quite a bit depending on the consumer. It text outlining the major threats would help to elimi- was discussed that the perfect forecast may not exist nate some of the confusion. since the public's needs can vary so greatly. NWS Regional Director Richard Augulis read an Various points were discussed by the broadcasters example of an NWS product known as Nowcast and on problems they encounter in making their presen- asked for the panel's opinion on how useful the pro- tations, including how time limitations can be a big duce was. The panel liked the conversational nature factor on what information can be presented and that of the product and were in general agreement that they data overload can be a problem if one tries to please preferred the greater detail contained in the product. everyone. The points were made that, in television, The television representatives on the panel said that broadcasters had to try to bring in as many viewers they would not read it verbatim on the air since they as possible, so the forecasts had to be geared to serve made their own presentation, but did find it useful for the broadest audience possible. the information it provided. The emergency manage- A question was asked as to how the NWS is seen ment representative said that she often read it during to fit in to the communication process, especially morning briefings for other agencies. where television and radio stations are concerned. The broadcasters also mentioned the forecast dis- Several points were made. First, the panel found the cussion products produced by the NWS. They found use of a variety of advisories, watches, and warnings them quite useful and wished that more were sent as during the winter season to be confusing. It was not weather situations evolved. They also said that they always clearly understood what the differences were would like to receive more severe weather reports. between the various headlines such as snow advisory, The emergency management agency representative winter weather advisory, heavy snow warning, and was asked how her agency receives its weather infor- winter storm warning. Panel members stated that they mation and what she looks for in the information. She Environmental Computer System The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has begun building a new environmental computer system ten times more powerful than computer systems now commercially available. The system will be an improved tool for scientists to study the behavior of the world's weather and oceans. From these studies, NOAA hopes to derive a greater predictive capability to provide reliable guidance in managing and protecting the environment. With the greater capability of the computer, NOAA hopes to extend its predictions to as much as two or three weeks, predicting global air and sea pollution, and assessing their conse- quences, examining the possibility of large-scale climate modification, and predicting hurricane de- velopment as well as assessing hurricane modification efforts. The new system will allow simulation of air and sea circulation and interaction more accurately than has been possible previously. On NOAA's behalf, the General Services Administration awarded a contract to Texas Instruments, Inc., for the system known as the Advanced Scientific Computer. The contract provides for an 8-year lease, beginning at about $4.5 million per year, decreasing thereafter, with an option to purchase. The computer is expected to be installed in NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, N. J., by mid-June 1973. The laboratory, under the direction of Dr. Joseph Smagorinsky, has been developing numerical models simulating the physical processes of the earth's oceans and atmosphere since 1955. The new computer system will allow accelerated research in modeling the atmosphere-ocean systems and will support the World Meteorological Organization's Global Atmospheric Research Program. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 53, 366. Vol. 78i, No. 4, April 1997 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-78.4.706
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Abstract

mation the public really wants. Adams explained that felt fewer types of headlines with more detail in the it can vary quite a bit depending on the consumer. It text outlining the major threats would help to elimi- was discussed that the perfect forecast may not exist nate some of the confusion. since the public's needs can vary so greatly. NWS Regional Director Richard Augulis read an Various points were discussed by the broadcasters example of an NWS product known as Nowcast and on problems they encounter in making their presen- asked for the panel's opinion on how useful the pro- tations, including how time limitations can be a big duce was. The panel liked the conversational nature factor on what information can be presented and that of the product and were in general agreement that they data overload can be a problem if one tries to please preferred the greater detail contained in the product. everyone. The points were made that, in television, The television representatives on the panel said that broadcasters had to try to bring in as many viewers they would not read it verbatim on the air since they as possible, so the forecasts had to be geared to serve made their own presentation, but did find it useful for the broadest audience possible. the information it provided. The emergency manage- A question was asked as to how the NWS is seen ment representative said that she often read it during to fit in to the communication process, especially morning briefings for other agencies. where television and radio stations are concerned. The broadcasters also mentioned the forecast dis- Several points were made. First, the panel found the cussion products produced by the NWS. They found use of a variety of advisories, watches, and warnings them quite useful and wished that more were sent as during the winter season to be confusing. It was not weather situations evolved. They also said that they always clearly understood what the differences were would like to receive more severe weather reports. between the various headlines such as snow advisory, The emergency management agency representative winter weather advisory, heavy snow warning, and was asked how her agency receives its weather infor- winter storm warning. Panel members stated that they mation and what she looks for in the information. She Environmental Computer System The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has begun building a new environmental computer system ten times more powerful than computer systems now commercially available. The system will be an improved tool for scientists to study the behavior of the world's weather and oceans. From these studies, NOAA hopes to derive a greater predictive capability to provide reliable guidance in managing and protecting the environment. With the greater capability of the computer, NOAA hopes to extend its predictions to as much as two or three weeks, predicting global air and sea pollution, and assessing their conse- quences, examining the possibility of large-scale climate modification, and predicting hurricane de- velopment as well as assessing hurricane modification efforts. The new system will allow simulation of air and sea circulation and interaction more accurately than has been possible previously. On NOAA's behalf, the General Services Administration awarded a contract to Texas Instruments, Inc., for the system known as the Advanced Scientific Computer. The contract provides for an 8-year lease, beginning at about $4.5 million per year, decreasing thereafter, with an option to purchase. The computer is expected to be installed in NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, N. J., by mid-June 1973. The laboratory, under the direction of Dr. Joseph Smagorinsky, has been developing numerical models simulating the physical processes of the earth's oceans and atmosphere since 1955. The new computer system will allow accelerated research in modeling the atmosphere-ocean systems and will support the World Meteorological Organization's Global Atmospheric Research Program. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 53, 366. Vol. 78i, No. 4, April 1997

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 1, 1997

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