25 Years Ago

25 Years Ago to Williams. He in turn provides answers for the some past decades. With the recent return of near- or above- of the questions received. normal precipitation in the Sahel, the frequency of The time members spent exploring the weather hurricanes may increase particularly in light of the page gave the group a idea of the massive amount of relative few number that occurred in recent years. information available on the USA Today home page. Members expressed interest in what current Sahel —Mary Scarzello. conditions may bring during the 1996 Atlantic hurri- cane season.—Dan Salkovitz. Central Virginia Central Louisiana The chapter met on 29 November 1995 at the NWS Richmond office to hear a presentation on Mid-At- Fall 1995 activities of the Central Louisiana chap- lantic region hurricanes and to hold a brief business ter centered around severe weather and flooding, high- meeting. Chapter President Alan Winfield has moved lighted by presentations from officials representing to Seattle, so the meeting was chaired by Dan area governmental agencies. Salkovitz, past president. A subcommittee was formed On 21 September 1995, Brett Kriger, deputy direc- to address this presidential vacancy. Todd Anderson, tor of the Lousiana Office of Emergency Prepared- treasurer, and Dan Salkovitz, past president, agreed ness (OEP), gave an overview of the "Louisiana Hur- to manage the chapter during the interim. Salkovitz ricane Drill of May 1995." Considered the largest un- also agreed to contact the AMS regarding local chap- dertaking of its kind ever in the United States, the drill ter stationery. was developed to evaluate a statewide response to Hurricane Jennifer, a fictitious category 4 storm track- After members introduced themselves, Hugh D. ing toward New Orleans. Kriger explained that the op- Cobb III, science operations officer meteorologist, eration involved the coordination of dozens of state NWS Wakefield Forecast Office, spoke about hurri- and federal agencies, as well as emergency manage- canes that have affected Mid-Atlantic states. Cobb ment and response offices from across the state—lit- showed the apparent relationship between annual hur- erally hundreds of individuals. According to Kriger, ricane frequency and rainfall in the African Sahel over UCA R Elects Chairman of the "The National Center now employs about 100 inno- Board vative scientists and total employment is about 500 Dr. Earl G. Droessler, vice presi- people. The personnel dent for research at the State Univer- and research programs sity of New York—Albany and past have been built up by AM S membership commissioner, the cooperating univer- was elected chairman of the Board of sities over the past 10 Trustees of the University Corpora- years. Today, NCAR tion for Atmospheric Research in early February. He enjoy s a respectable succeeds John C. Calhoun Jr., vice president for pro- position as a high-qual- grams of the Texas A&M University system. ity research center. The UCAR established and operates the National Cen- opportunity in the de- ter for Atmospheric Research under the sponsorship cade of the 1970's is to of the National Science Foundation. As one of the employ this research NCAR founders, Dr. Droessler has played an active excellence toward the role in the Center's activities, and for the past three solutions of some of the problems of mankind cen- years served as Trustee-at-Large of UCAR. Prior to tered on improving the quality of our life." his appointment to SUNYA, he was program direc- tor for atmospheric sciences in the National Science Foundation. Commenting on his new post, Dr. Droessler said, Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 52, 183. 58 6 Vol. 77, No. 3, March 7 99 6 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

to Williams. He in turn provides answers for the some past decades. With the recent return of near- or above- of the questions received. normal precipitation in the Sahel, the frequency of The time members spent exploring the weather hurricanes may increase particularly in light of the page gave the group a idea of the massive amount of relative few number that occurred in recent years. information available on the USA Today home page. Members expressed interest in what current Sahel —Mary Scarzello. conditions may bring during the 1996 Atlantic hurri- cane season.—Dan Salkovitz. Central Virginia Central Louisiana The chapter met on 29 November 1995 at the NWS Richmond office to hear a presentation on Mid-At- Fall 1995 activities of the Central Louisiana chap- lantic region hurricanes and to hold a brief business ter centered around severe weather and flooding, high- meeting. Chapter President Alan Winfield has moved lighted by presentations from officials representing to Seattle, so the meeting was chaired by Dan area governmental agencies. Salkovitz, past president. A subcommittee was formed On 21 September 1995, Brett Kriger, deputy direc- to address this presidential vacancy. Todd Anderson, tor of the Lousiana Office of Emergency Prepared- treasurer, and Dan Salkovitz, past president, agreed ness (OEP), gave an overview of the "Louisiana Hur- to manage the chapter during the interim. Salkovitz ricane Drill of May 1995." Considered the largest un- also agreed to contact the AMS regarding local chap- dertaking of its kind ever in the United States, the drill ter stationery. was developed to evaluate a statewide response to Hurricane Jennifer, a fictitious category 4 storm track- After members introduced themselves, Hugh D. ing toward New Orleans. Kriger explained that the op- Cobb III, science operations officer meteorologist, eration involved the coordination of dozens of state NWS Wakefield Forecast Office, spoke about hurri- and federal agencies, as well as emergency manage- canes that have affected Mid-Atlantic states. Cobb ment and response offices from across the state—lit- showed the apparent relationship between annual hur- erally hundreds of individuals. According to Kriger, ricane frequency and rainfall in the African Sahel over UCA R Elects Chairman of the "The National Center now employs about 100 inno- Board vative scientists and total employment is about 500 Dr. Earl G. Droessler, vice presi- people. The personnel dent for research at the State Univer- and research programs sity of New York—Albany and past have been built up by AM S membership commissioner, the cooperating univer- was elected chairman of the Board of sities over the past 10 Trustees of the University Corpora- years. Today, NCAR tion for Atmospheric Research in early February. He enjoy s a respectable succeeds John C. Calhoun Jr., vice president for pro- position as a high-qual- grams of the Texas A&M University system. ity research center. The UCAR established and operates the National Cen- opportunity in the de- ter for Atmospheric Research under the sponsorship cade of the 1970's is to of the National Science Foundation. As one of the employ this research NCAR founders, Dr. Droessler has played an active excellence toward the role in the Center's activities, and for the past three solutions of some of the problems of mankind cen- years served as Trustee-at-Large of UCAR. Prior to tered on improving the quality of our life." his appointment to SUNYA, he was program direc- tor for atmospheric sciences in the National Science Foundation. Commenting on his new post, Dr. Droessler said, Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 52, 183. 58 6 Vol. 77, No. 3, March 7 99 6

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1996

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