25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO Max Mayfield, director of the National Hurricane Management Agency (FEMA) Director Director Center, presented a graph that indicated the late 1990s James Lee Witt released the latest figures at an Earth brought a frequency of major storms considerably Week news conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, higher than nearly all of the past century. Only a short which focused on global climate change and links period in the late 1940s came close. between a warming atmosphere and more severe "After the last five years, it would be very, very weather. foolish to expect we're not going to have a high num- "Our climate is warming at a faster rate than ever be- ber of storms," said Mayfield. fore recorded. Ignoring climate change and the most recent warming patterns could be costly to the nation. The National Hurricane Conference brings together Small changes in global temperatures can lead to more forecasters and emergency management officials from extreme weather events including, droughts, floods and across the country to discuss advances in predicting hurricanes," Baker said. "We will continue to provide the the frequency, strength, and path of hurricanes, as well best possible data and forecasts to the policy makers as ways to minimize damage and loss of life. to help them as they deal with these difficult issues." NOAA Reports Record Warmth for January- "There is no doubt that the human and financial March 2000 costs of weather-related disasters have been increas- The United States experienced the warmest Janu- ing in recent years. It is time to increase our efforts in ary-March period ever according to 106 years of applying prevention strategies to reduce the impacts record-keeping compiled by the National Oceanic and of the changes in weather climates," said Witt. At the news conference, FEMA reported that dam- Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Cli- age from more frequent and severe weather calamities matic Data Center. and other natural phenomena during the past decade The latest data also show that June 1999-March required 460 major disasters to be declared, nearly 2000 was the warmest June-March on record. NOAA double the 237 declarations for the previous 10-yr Administrator D. James Baker and Federal Emergency Project Antarqui The United States and Peru recently launched 44 sounding rockets and bal- loons over South American in a joint study of the Earth's atmosphere and, in particular, the ionosphere. The project, named "Antarqui" for the Inca god of flight, involved launchings over a two-to-three week period which began about 21 May. Thirty sounding rockets and about 14 balloons were launched from the Chilca Launch Range in Peru, a site located on the magnetic equator, to heights rang- ing from 20 to 160 km. The atmospheric region to be studied was measured under quiet and disturbed magnetic field conditions. Measurements included those dealing with the composition of the neutral and ionized atmosphere, density and temperature, and wind, shear, and turbulence. The launchings were conducted in conjunction with the operation of instruments on the At- mosphere Explorer-C satellite and a large ground-based installation at Jicamarca, Peru, that uses radar signals. [ . . . ] Project Antarqui is a continuation of the NASA sounding rocket program conducted during the 1964-65 International Quiet Sun Year, in which the Peruvian scientific community also participated. Data from the 1975 project correlated with the earlier findings. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 56, 710. 16 75 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-81.7.1623
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Abstract

Max Mayfield, director of the National Hurricane Management Agency (FEMA) Director Director Center, presented a graph that indicated the late 1990s James Lee Witt released the latest figures at an Earth brought a frequency of major storms considerably Week news conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, higher than nearly all of the past century. Only a short which focused on global climate change and links period in the late 1940s came close. between a warming atmosphere and more severe "After the last five years, it would be very, very weather. foolish to expect we're not going to have a high num- "Our climate is warming at a faster rate than ever be- ber of storms," said Mayfield. fore recorded. Ignoring climate change and the most recent warming patterns could be costly to the nation. The National Hurricane Conference brings together Small changes in global temperatures can lead to more forecasters and emergency management officials from extreme weather events including, droughts, floods and across the country to discuss advances in predicting hurricanes," Baker said. "We will continue to provide the the frequency, strength, and path of hurricanes, as well best possible data and forecasts to the policy makers as ways to minimize damage and loss of life. to help them as they deal with these difficult issues." NOAA Reports Record Warmth for January- "There is no doubt that the human and financial March 2000 costs of weather-related disasters have been increas- The United States experienced the warmest Janu- ing in recent years. It is time to increase our efforts in ary-March period ever according to 106 years of applying prevention strategies to reduce the impacts record-keeping compiled by the National Oceanic and of the changes in weather climates," said Witt. At the news conference, FEMA reported that dam- Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Cli- age from more frequent and severe weather calamities matic Data Center. and other natural phenomena during the past decade The latest data also show that June 1999-March required 460 major disasters to be declared, nearly 2000 was the warmest June-March on record. NOAA double the 237 declarations for the previous 10-yr Administrator D. James Baker and Federal Emergency Project Antarqui The United States and Peru recently launched 44 sounding rockets and bal- loons over South American in a joint study of the Earth's atmosphere and, in particular, the ionosphere. The project, named "Antarqui" for the Inca god of flight, involved launchings over a two-to-three week period which began about 21 May. Thirty sounding rockets and about 14 balloons were launched from the Chilca Launch Range in Peru, a site located on the magnetic equator, to heights rang- ing from 20 to 160 km. The atmospheric region to be studied was measured under quiet and disturbed magnetic field conditions. Measurements included those dealing with the composition of the neutral and ionized atmosphere, density and temperature, and wind, shear, and turbulence. The launchings were conducted in conjunction with the operation of instruments on the At- mosphere Explorer-C satellite and a large ground-based installation at Jicamarca, Peru, that uses radar signals. [ . . . ] Project Antarqui is a continuation of the NASA sounding rocket program conducted during the 1964-65 International Quiet Sun Year, in which the Peruvian scientific community also participated. Data from the 1975 project correlated with the earlier findings. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 56, 710. 16 75 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jul 1, 2000

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