25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO reflectivity and wind shear loops from the WSR-88D was recently held in Phoenix, Arizona. According to Doppler radar. He described the difficulty they had Wroten, El Nino and deriving tropical rainfall rates warning as there was extremely rapid development from satellite data were topics of great interest. Also, of numerous vortices. Amazingly, he said, one tornado it was mentioned that the Mid-South Science Fair did remain on the ground for three miles and had a would be held at the fairgrounds at the end of March width of a quarter mile. This particular outbreak was and judges were needed. A couple of members agreed anticipated at least two days in advance and the NWS to participate in this event. had issued moderate risk statements for severe weather The speaker for the meeting was Tim Campbell, at that time.—Aaron Studwell. who performs research in the field of human biometeo- rology. Campbell began his presentation with a dis- Memphi s cussion of sustainability and the need for an interdis- Chapter members convened on 20 January 1998. ciplinary approach to this topic. Human biometeorol- The evening commenced with a brief business meet- ogy is the effect of weather and climate on humans, ing. Among the topics discussed was the potential both physically and psychologically. He discussed speakers for upcoming meetings. Mike Wroten gave some of the physiological effects that weather, includ- a brief report on the 78th AMS Annual Meeting that ing the changing of atmospheric pressure and cloud Cloud Seeders to the Rescue Early in January atmospheric scientists working on a cloud physics project out of the University of Washington, Seattle, performed a dramatic rescue operation with cloud seeding. Using a vintage twin-engine Douglas B23 aircraft the scientists seeded heavy clouds with Dry Ice to clear an area so that rescue operations for three men downed in a crash-landed single-engine private plane could be performed. The drama began after pilot James Brackett of Spangle, Wash., radioed that his Beechcraft Bonanza was out of fuel. Brackett and his two passengers, Ray Duttero of Kirkland, Wash., and Bernie Niel of Bellevue, Wash., were returning from a ski trip to Utah. Traffic controllers from the Federal Aviation Administration radioed Brackett to attempt to land on the Howard Hanson Reservoir about 10 miles south- east of Black Diamond, Wash., but the plane never made it that far, crashing instead into the foothills of the Cascades in a logged-off area near Chester Morris Lake. While this drama was occurring, the University's plane was flying 1200 ft above the weather listening to the conversation. A rescue helicop- ter dispatched by the Army was unable to reach the downed plane because of the low ceiling and icing conditions over the accident. Checking with flight scientists Dr. Lawrence Radke, the FAA learned that there was a possibility that seeding with some solid carbon dioxide, carried aboard the U. of Washington plane, just might disperse enough of the clouds to form a hole big enough for a helicopter to rescue the men. A second Army heli- copter from the 92nd Aviation Reserve Unit at Sand Point, Wash., was sent to the rescue as the Dry Ice slowly but surely dissipated the clouds in the area over the accident. The men were rescued in the oncoming darkness just as the Dry-Ice-produced hole was clouding over. Dr. Peter Hobbs, Head of the UW cloud physics program, commented that this rescue operation was the first UW attempt at operational cloud seeding, a case of "being in the right place at the right time." In addition to Dr. Radke and pilot Robert Spurling, graduate student Richard Eagan and UW staffers Laurens Engel and Donald Atkinson were aboard the rescue plane. Two teams of FAA traffic controllers at Au- burn and McChord AFB and the Washington State Aeronautics Commission helped to coordinate the rescue. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 54, 238. 48 7 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-79.3.489
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Abstract

reflectivity and wind shear loops from the WSR-88D was recently held in Phoenix, Arizona. According to Doppler radar. He described the difficulty they had Wroten, El Nino and deriving tropical rainfall rates warning as there was extremely rapid development from satellite data were topics of great interest. Also, of numerous vortices. Amazingly, he said, one tornado it was mentioned that the Mid-South Science Fair did remain on the ground for three miles and had a would be held at the fairgrounds at the end of March width of a quarter mile. This particular outbreak was and judges were needed. A couple of members agreed anticipated at least two days in advance and the NWS to participate in this event. had issued moderate risk statements for severe weather The speaker for the meeting was Tim Campbell, at that time.—Aaron Studwell. who performs research in the field of human biometeo- rology. Campbell began his presentation with a dis- Memphi s cussion of sustainability and the need for an interdis- Chapter members convened on 20 January 1998. ciplinary approach to this topic. Human biometeorol- The evening commenced with a brief business meet- ogy is the effect of weather and climate on humans, ing. Among the topics discussed was the potential both physically and psychologically. He discussed speakers for upcoming meetings. Mike Wroten gave some of the physiological effects that weather, includ- a brief report on the 78th AMS Annual Meeting that ing the changing of atmospheric pressure and cloud Cloud Seeders to the Rescue Early in January atmospheric scientists working on a cloud physics project out of the University of Washington, Seattle, performed a dramatic rescue operation with cloud seeding. Using a vintage twin-engine Douglas B23 aircraft the scientists seeded heavy clouds with Dry Ice to clear an area so that rescue operations for three men downed in a crash-landed single-engine private plane could be performed. The drama began after pilot James Brackett of Spangle, Wash., radioed that his Beechcraft Bonanza was out of fuel. Brackett and his two passengers, Ray Duttero of Kirkland, Wash., and Bernie Niel of Bellevue, Wash., were returning from a ski trip to Utah. Traffic controllers from the Federal Aviation Administration radioed Brackett to attempt to land on the Howard Hanson Reservoir about 10 miles south- east of Black Diamond, Wash., but the plane never made it that far, crashing instead into the foothills of the Cascades in a logged-off area near Chester Morris Lake. While this drama was occurring, the University's plane was flying 1200 ft above the weather listening to the conversation. A rescue helicop- ter dispatched by the Army was unable to reach the downed plane because of the low ceiling and icing conditions over the accident. Checking with flight scientists Dr. Lawrence Radke, the FAA learned that there was a possibility that seeding with some solid carbon dioxide, carried aboard the U. of Washington plane, just might disperse enough of the clouds to form a hole big enough for a helicopter to rescue the men. A second Army heli- copter from the 92nd Aviation Reserve Unit at Sand Point, Wash., was sent to the rescue as the Dry Ice slowly but surely dissipated the clouds in the area over the accident. The men were rescued in the oncoming darkness just as the Dry-Ice-produced hole was clouding over. Dr. Peter Hobbs, Head of the UW cloud physics program, commented that this rescue operation was the first UW attempt at operational cloud seeding, a case of "being in the right place at the right time." In addition to Dr. Radke and pilot Robert Spurling, graduate student Richard Eagan and UW staffers Laurens Engel and Donald Atkinson were aboard the rescue plane. Two teams of FAA traffic controllers at Au- burn and McChord AFB and the Washington State Aeronautics Commission helped to coordinate the rescue. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 54, 238. 48 7 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1998

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