25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO Leopoldina , in 1968 he received the Alfre d Wegener Medal of the Germa n Meteorological Association, and in 1973 the Carl-Gustaf Rossby Medal fro m the AMS. IM O Priz e t o MI T Christian Junge was one of those honest scientists Professo r encouragin g young scientists rather than disappoint- Th e 16th IM O Prize, given ing them with his huge knowledge. This was so that annually for outstandin g work he could tell them that successful science is a mixture in meteorology and interna- of luck, competence, and hard work. Th e story of how tional collaboration, has been he foun d the stratospheric dust layer is typical of that awarde d by the World Meteo- tendency: when the Russians finally triumphe d in the rological Organization Execu- space race, all research efforts in U.S. governmental tive Committee to J. G. Charney, professor of installations was aimed toward space research and all meteorolog y at the Massachusetts Institute of scientists had to contribute to that or leave. For his Technology and chairman of the U.S. Commit- research, Junge decided to look for cosmic particles te e for the Global Atmospheric Research in the stratosphere, which could be fatal fo r space ve- Program . hicles. His proposal was well received and funded. Th e Interna- Th e result was the discovery of the Junge layer. Un- tiona l Meteoro- fortunately—thi s is what he said—he looked into the logica l Organiza- chemistry of those particles and found sulfur, rather tion Prize was es- unusual for cosmic particles. For that reason, this re- tablishe d in 1955 search was terminated. At this time, Junge wrote his by the World Me- book and looked for a new position in Germany. teorological Orga- Workin g with Christian Junge was a challenging nizatio n in honor undertaking. He offere d enthusiastically new ideas for of the IMO , the or- ganization that ini- his collaborators to work with and gave them "free- tiated international collaboration in meteorol- do m of work." He also encouraged his colleagues to ogy in 1873. Other U.S. meteorologists who determine what is elementary for scientists to develop, hav e received the prize are C.-G. Rossby and to follow their own muse, and to carry forward sci- F. W. Reichelderfer. ence. That way, Jung e was certain of getting a broad- ening flo w of knowledg e to his research group and his Charney' s research contributions to meteo- science. His students today have established positions rology began to appear soon after Worl d War in science, and the institute he finally left continues II and quickly established him as a leading to flourish. Th e discussions with him developed fro m worke r in the application of fluid dynamics to detail to global views, and even for thes e cases he had the problem of the atmosphere's large-scale a firm view and opinion. In retirement, he continued motions . His pioneering work with J. von with other interesting topics like anthropology and Neuman n at the Institute for Advance d Study, English history. W e all have lost a blessed and lead- Princeton , beginning in 1946, stimulated re- ing scientist and praiseworthy person. search around the world on numerical methods in dynami c meteorology and prepared the way H e leaves his wife, who lives in Uberlingen, and fo r a major advance in the science of meteo- tw o daughters.—Ruprecht Jaenicke. • rology. The Executive Committee noted that Charney , utilizing a powerfu l combination of Reference s physical insight and mathematical skill, is con- tinuin g to make major contributions to the science. Chagnon, C. W., and C. E. Junge, 1961: The vertical distribution of sub-micron particles in the stratosphere. J. Meteor., 18, 746-75 2 Junge , C. E., 1952: Gesetzmaessigkeiten in der Groessen- verteilung atmosphaerischer Aerosole ueber dem Kontinent. Berichte des DWD in der US-Zone, 35, 261-277. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 52, 805. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 18 75 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

Leopoldina , in 1968 he received the Alfre d Wegener Medal of the Germa n Meteorological Association, and in 1973 the Carl-Gustaf Rossby Medal fro m the AMS. IM O Priz e t o MI T Christian Junge was one of those honest scientists Professo r encouragin g young scientists rather than disappoint- Th e 16th IM O Prize, given ing them with his huge knowledge. This was so that annually for outstandin g work he could tell them that successful science is a mixture in meteorology and interna- of luck, competence, and hard work. Th e story of how tional collaboration, has been he foun d the stratospheric dust layer is typical of that awarde d by the World Meteo- tendency: when the Russians finally triumphe d in the rological Organization Execu- space race, all research efforts in U.S. governmental tive Committee to J. G. Charney, professor of installations was aimed toward space research and all meteorolog y at the Massachusetts Institute of scientists had to contribute to that or leave. For his Technology and chairman of the U.S. Commit- research, Junge decided to look for cosmic particles te e for the Global Atmospheric Research in the stratosphere, which could be fatal fo r space ve- Program . hicles. His proposal was well received and funded. Th e Interna- Th e result was the discovery of the Junge layer. Un- tiona l Meteoro- fortunately—thi s is what he said—he looked into the logica l Organiza- chemistry of those particles and found sulfur, rather tion Prize was es- unusual for cosmic particles. For that reason, this re- tablishe d in 1955 search was terminated. At this time, Junge wrote his by the World Me- book and looked for a new position in Germany. teorological Orga- Workin g with Christian Junge was a challenging nizatio n in honor undertaking. He offere d enthusiastically new ideas for of the IMO , the or- ganization that ini- his collaborators to work with and gave them "free- tiated international collaboration in meteorol- do m of work." He also encouraged his colleagues to ogy in 1873. Other U.S. meteorologists who determine what is elementary for scientists to develop, hav e received the prize are C.-G. Rossby and to follow their own muse, and to carry forward sci- F. W. Reichelderfer. ence. That way, Jung e was certain of getting a broad- ening flo w of knowledg e to his research group and his Charney' s research contributions to meteo- science. His students today have established positions rology began to appear soon after Worl d War in science, and the institute he finally left continues II and quickly established him as a leading to flourish. Th e discussions with him developed fro m worke r in the application of fluid dynamics to detail to global views, and even for thes e cases he had the problem of the atmosphere's large-scale a firm view and opinion. In retirement, he continued motions . His pioneering work with J. von with other interesting topics like anthropology and Neuman n at the Institute for Advance d Study, English history. W e all have lost a blessed and lead- Princeton , beginning in 1946, stimulated re- ing scientist and praiseworthy person. search around the world on numerical methods in dynami c meteorology and prepared the way H e leaves his wife, who lives in Uberlingen, and fo r a major advance in the science of meteo- tw o daughters.—Ruprecht Jaenicke. • rology. The Executive Committee noted that Charney , utilizing a powerfu l combination of Reference s physical insight and mathematical skill, is con- tinuin g to make major contributions to the science. Chagnon, C. W., and C. E. Junge, 1961: The vertical distribution of sub-micron particles in the stratosphere. J. Meteor., 18, 746-75 2 Junge , C. E., 1952: Gesetzmaessigkeiten in der Groessen- verteilung atmosphaerischer Aerosole ueber dem Kontinent. Berichte des DWD in der US-Zone, 35, 261-277. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 52, 805. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 18 75

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Published: Aug 1, 1996

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