25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO He believes that the four factors he discussed are with his big project that would include involvement enough to predict a drought, and all in all there is a and support from various government and university substantial risk for dry weather in 2000.—Christine programs around the country. Zagorski. Mark Conder, student member and organizer of the storm intercept team, discussed the upcoming chasing West Texas season, including the availability of a new digital cam- The first meeting of the new year was held on 21 era made possible through the Geosciences Depart- February. Chapter President Gary Skwira discussed ment and Wind Engineering Group. The meeting the budget and possible ideas on spending it. Mem- concluded by planning a gathering in early March to bers threw forward ideas that were then prioritized. promote local chapter spirit. Activities would include The favorite was making brochures that contained in- a grill out and volleyball.—Dan Grams. formation about the chapter to share with interested Palmetto parties. Two members will have responsibility for a photographer for the chapter. Pictures will be taken On 31 January 2000, the chapter took a tour of the during gatherings and storm chasing events as part of NWS office in Columbia, South Carolina. Approxi- documenting the chapter acitivities. Meteorology-re- mately 30 people attended the tour of the NWS facili- lated research projects for the spring were discussed. ties headed by Science Operations Officer Mike Al Pietrycha, student member and graduate student, Cammarata, with assistance from Ron Jones, Steve gave a short presentation on the project he has put to- Naglic, and Tony Petrolito. A demonstration was gether. He stressed the need for volunteers to help out given of the wide variety of products available for ——— — Decrease in Sunshine Noted Meteorologists Dr. James K. Angell and Julius Korshover of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Research Labora- tories report that between 1950 and 1972, there has been an eight percent de- crease in percentage of possible sunshine received at the earth's surface during autumn, and a three percent increase during spring in the contiguous 48 states. Angell and Korshover say there are at least three reasonable explanations for such a decrease in sunshine after 1964; 1) an overall increase in cloudiness within the United States associated with long-term climatic trends; 2) enhancement of natural cirrus clouds from contrails formed by high-flying aircraft (for which there is some evi- dence), and a consequent increase in fairly thick cirrus cloudiness; and 3) an increase in pollu- tion within the United States to delay the turning on of the sunshine detector instrument when the sun is near the horizon, and to advance its turning off in the evening. "The relatively large decrease in percentage of possible sunshine in the industrialized northeast support the third hy- pothesis," Angell said. [.. . ] The scientists suggested that it would be of interest for other nations to examine their records of sunshine duration and note the extent to which these trends are representative of hemi- sphere- or world-wide conditions. Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc., 56, 556-557 . mm Vol. 8 J, No. 5, May 2000 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-81.5.1114
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Abstract

He believes that the four factors he discussed are with his big project that would include involvement enough to predict a drought, and all in all there is a and support from various government and university substantial risk for dry weather in 2000.—Christine programs around the country. Zagorski. Mark Conder, student member and organizer of the storm intercept team, discussed the upcoming chasing West Texas season, including the availability of a new digital cam- The first meeting of the new year was held on 21 era made possible through the Geosciences Depart- February. Chapter President Gary Skwira discussed ment and Wind Engineering Group. The meeting the budget and possible ideas on spending it. Mem- concluded by planning a gathering in early March to bers threw forward ideas that were then prioritized. promote local chapter spirit. Activities would include The favorite was making brochures that contained in- a grill out and volleyball.—Dan Grams. formation about the chapter to share with interested Palmetto parties. Two members will have responsibility for a photographer for the chapter. Pictures will be taken On 31 January 2000, the chapter took a tour of the during gatherings and storm chasing events as part of NWS office in Columbia, South Carolina. Approxi- documenting the chapter acitivities. Meteorology-re- mately 30 people attended the tour of the NWS facili- lated research projects for the spring were discussed. ties headed by Science Operations Officer Mike Al Pietrycha, student member and graduate student, Cammarata, with assistance from Ron Jones, Steve gave a short presentation on the project he has put to- Naglic, and Tony Petrolito. A demonstration was gether. He stressed the need for volunteers to help out given of the wide variety of products available for ——— — Decrease in Sunshine Noted Meteorologists Dr. James K. Angell and Julius Korshover of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Research Labora- tories report that between 1950 and 1972, there has been an eight percent de- crease in percentage of possible sunshine received at the earth's surface during autumn, and a three percent increase during spring in the contiguous 48 states. Angell and Korshover say there are at least three reasonable explanations for such a decrease in sunshine after 1964; 1) an overall increase in cloudiness within the United States associated with long-term climatic trends; 2) enhancement of natural cirrus clouds from contrails formed by high-flying aircraft (for which there is some evi- dence), and a consequent increase in fairly thick cirrus cloudiness; and 3) an increase in pollu- tion within the United States to delay the turning on of the sunshine detector instrument when the sun is near the horizon, and to advance its turning off in the evening. "The relatively large decrease in percentage of possible sunshine in the industrialized northeast support the third hy- pothesis," Angell said. [.. . ] The scientists suggested that it would be of interest for other nations to examine their records of sunshine duration and note the extent to which these trends are representative of hemi- sphere- or world-wide conditions. Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc., 56, 556-557 . mm Vol. 8 J, No. 5, May 2000

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: May 1, 2000

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