25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO rect, but underestimated the number of supercells and have been a "successful forecast," Roebber mentioned, tornadoes in the region. However, the model was much as the MM5 was predicting at least 10 supercells over the region, with a tornadic outbreak as a definite pos- more accurate in forecasting the events that evolved sibility. However, model mesh limitations prohibited on 3 May 1999 than any other operational model. the real-time MM5 from perhaps producing an even With the new MM5 model and new technology, fore- more accurate forecast of the severe weather event. casts will become better with time, but completely rely- It appeared as though the outbreak stemmed from ing on the real-time MM5 model should not be done, a hole in cirrus clouds over northwestern Texas, south- since it is model "guidance" and not the complete answer west of Wichita Falls on 3 May 1999. The MM5 pre- to every weather forecasting issue.—Jim Johnson. dicted this. As cumulus clouds were forming in the Housto n clearing area, the Storm Prediction Center had a dif- ferent forecast, mentioning that the typical dry lin e fea- The chapter normally takes a break during the sum- ture of the southern Plains states may turn active and mer months. However, they met on 18 July 2000 for interact with the warm and humid air mass to the east a presentation by Bill Roeder. later in the day. As it turned out, the MM5 was cor- Regular duties included a call to order by Chapter NR L Rada r Ma y Yield Real-Time Sea State Data The Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., in conjunction with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, has completed tests of an airborne radar system developed by NRL, designed to measure localized wind speeds and wave heights on a real-time basis. As a result of a six-month program of research experiments conducted on a C- 54 aircraft over the Atlantic Ocean near Wallops Island, Va., by an NRL/NASA science team, it may now be possible to design a compact radar system for opera- tional use. Development of such a system would provide important data for trans- ports, small craft operators, and meteorologists by giving them immediate information on localized wind and sea states. The joint NRL/NASA measurement program proved that wind speed and sea-surface signifi- cant wave height can be measured remotely using NRL' s short pulsed (2 ns) nadir-looking, wide beam antenna, 3 cm radar system. The measurements included data taken over a range of significant wave heights from zero to 5 m and wind speeds from 3 to 13 m/s. NRL developed the 3 cm radar system about two years ago for shipboard use, where it is used to differentiate between sea clutter reflections from radar pulses and foreign objects. As envisioned in its airborne role, the proposed radar would not need a scanning antenna, Doppler filters, or ab- solute power calibrations. NRL' s Donald L. Hammond and Robert A. Menella, and Dr. Edward Walsh from NASA, who have been actively involved in the research, planned to present a paper on their findings to the U.S. National Committee/International Union of Radio Science-IEEE meeting at Boulder, Colo., this fall. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 56, 1120-1121. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

25 YEARS AGO

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Abstract

rect, but underestimated the number of supercells and have been a "successful forecast," Roebber mentioned, tornadoes in the region. However, the model was much as the MM5 was predicting at least 10 supercells over the region, with a tornadic outbreak as a definite pos- more accurate in forecasting the events that evolved sibility. However, model mesh limitations prohibited on 3 May 1999 than any other operational model. the real-time MM5 from perhaps producing an even With the new MM5 model and new technology, fore- more accurate forecast of the severe weather event. casts will become better with time, but completely rely- It appeared as though the outbreak stemmed from ing on the real-time MM5 model should not be done, a hole in cirrus clouds over northwestern Texas, south- since it is model "guidance" and not the complete answer west of Wichita Falls on 3 May 1999. The MM5 pre- to every weather forecasting issue.—Jim Johnson. dicted this. As cumulus clouds were forming in the Housto n clearing area, the Storm Prediction Center had a dif- ferent forecast, mentioning that the typical dry lin e fea- The chapter normally takes a break during the sum- ture of the southern Plains states may turn active and mer months. However, they met on 18 July 2000 for interact with the warm and humid air mass to the east a presentation by Bill Roeder. later in the day. As it turned out, the MM5 was cor- Regular duties included a call to order by Chapter NR L Rada r Ma y Yield Real-Time Sea State Data The Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., in conjunction with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, has completed tests of an airborne radar system developed by NRL, designed to measure localized wind speeds and wave heights on a real-time basis. As a result of a six-month program of research experiments conducted on a C- 54 aircraft over the Atlantic Ocean near Wallops Island, Va., by an NRL/NASA science team, it may now be possible to design a compact radar system for opera- tional use. Development of such a system would provide important data for trans- ports, small craft operators, and meteorologists by giving them immediate information on localized wind and sea states. The joint NRL/NASA measurement program proved that wind speed and sea-surface signifi- cant wave height can be measured remotely using NRL' s short pulsed (2 ns) nadir-looking, wide beam antenna, 3 cm radar system. The measurements included data taken over a range of significant wave heights from zero to 5 m and wind speeds from 3 to 13 m/s. NRL developed the 3 cm radar system about two years ago for shipboard use, where it is used to differentiate between sea clutter reflections from radar pulses and foreign objects. As envisioned in its airborne role, the proposed radar would not need a scanning antenna, Doppler filters, or ab- solute power calibrations. NRL' s Donald L. Hammond and Robert A. Menella, and Dr. Edward Walsh from NASA, who have been actively involved in the research, planned to present a paper on their findings to the U.S. National Committee/International Union of Radio Science-IEEE meeting at Boulder, Colo., this fall. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 56, 1120-1121. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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