25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO interest were the tornado that struck Steele and the teacher workshops featuring several AMS educational severe wind event at Bismarck. initiatives on 7 October. Participants learned about Schrader also gave a video presentation of several classroom activities and information available through the DataStreme Project, the online AMS weather edu- severe weather events that affected much of northern cation program; Project Atmosphere, the teacher-train- North Dakota.—Todd Hamilton. ing, weather education program; as well as the physical New York City-Long Island oceanography education program, the Maury Project. The Earth and Environmental Science Department Information was also presented on science education of C. W. Post College of Long Island University, lo- networking opportunities available through the Suf- cated in Brookville, New York, hosted and sponsored folk, Nassau, and Brooklyn-Queens sections of the Tornado Swoth Recorded on Satellite Image A tornado which leveled Guin, Ala., 3 April 1974 cut a swath of destruction through the Bankhead National Forest and adjacent wooded areas wide enough to show up on a space view taken by a satellite 900 km above the Earth. Este F. Holly day, hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior, and James G. Cook, civil engineer technician in the Soils Laboratory, Army Corps of Engineers, spotted the 92 km long tornado track through the Northern Alabama forestland while examining images of Alabama taken by NASA's Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1), in connection with other studies. Both Hollyday and Cook are headquartered in Nashville, Tenn. "It is believed to be the longest tornado track ever recorded on satellite imagery," they said in a report to appear in a book on ERTS-1 applications scheduled for publication by the Department of Interior's Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) program, which is aimed at applying ERTS-1 and other remote sensing data to Earth resources and environmental studies. Hollyday and Cook said they first mistook the tornado track for the contrail of an airplane, one of which appeared on another part of the ERTS-1 image covering 185 by 185 km of the Earth's surface. But the tornado track did not have a shadow as the contrail did, nor was the contrail present on subsequent images of the area. The initial ERTS-1 image also showed two shorter tornado tracks parallel with the main one, but they were too faint to be easily seen with the naked eye. Hollyday and Cook said ground inspection showed that along Alabama Route 33 near the cen- ter of the Bankhead National Forest, trees in the path of the tornado were uprooted or twisted off over a width of nearly 600 m. Trees were bent or otherwise over an even wider path of about 1100 m. The swath was wider on high ground than in valleys, but destruction in the valleys was as great or greater than on high ground. The tornado track enters the ERTS-1 image near the southwest corner, passes through Guin and goes on almost a straight line northeast through the Bankhead National Forest, covering a total of 92 km. One of the shorter tracks is near the western edge of the National Forest, and the other crosses Lewis Smith Lake about 23 km southeast of the main swath. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 56, 93-94. Vol. 8 7, No. 7, January 2000 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

interest were the tornado that struck Steele and the teacher workshops featuring several AMS educational severe wind event at Bismarck. initiatives on 7 October. Participants learned about Schrader also gave a video presentation of several classroom activities and information available through the DataStreme Project, the online AMS weather edu- severe weather events that affected much of northern cation program; Project Atmosphere, the teacher-train- North Dakota.—Todd Hamilton. ing, weather education program; as well as the physical New York City-Long Island oceanography education program, the Maury Project. The Earth and Environmental Science Department Information was also presented on science education of C. W. Post College of Long Island University, lo- networking opportunities available through the Suf- cated in Brookville, New York, hosted and sponsored folk, Nassau, and Brooklyn-Queens sections of the Tornado Swoth Recorded on Satellite Image A tornado which leveled Guin, Ala., 3 April 1974 cut a swath of destruction through the Bankhead National Forest and adjacent wooded areas wide enough to show up on a space view taken by a satellite 900 km above the Earth. Este F. Holly day, hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior, and James G. Cook, civil engineer technician in the Soils Laboratory, Army Corps of Engineers, spotted the 92 km long tornado track through the Northern Alabama forestland while examining images of Alabama taken by NASA's Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1), in connection with other studies. Both Hollyday and Cook are headquartered in Nashville, Tenn. "It is believed to be the longest tornado track ever recorded on satellite imagery," they said in a report to appear in a book on ERTS-1 applications scheduled for publication by the Department of Interior's Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) program, which is aimed at applying ERTS-1 and other remote sensing data to Earth resources and environmental studies. Hollyday and Cook said they first mistook the tornado track for the contrail of an airplane, one of which appeared on another part of the ERTS-1 image covering 185 by 185 km of the Earth's surface. But the tornado track did not have a shadow as the contrail did, nor was the contrail present on subsequent images of the area. The initial ERTS-1 image also showed two shorter tornado tracks parallel with the main one, but they were too faint to be easily seen with the naked eye. Hollyday and Cook said ground inspection showed that along Alabama Route 33 near the cen- ter of the Bankhead National Forest, trees in the path of the tornado were uprooted or twisted off over a width of nearly 600 m. Trees were bent or otherwise over an even wider path of about 1100 m. The swath was wider on high ground than in valleys, but destruction in the valleys was as great or greater than on high ground. The tornado track enters the ERTS-1 image near the southwest corner, passes through Guin and goes on almost a straight line northeast through the Bankhead National Forest, covering a total of 92 km. One of the shorter tracks is near the western edge of the National Forest, and the other crosses Lewis Smith Lake about 23 km southeast of the main swath. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 56, 93-94. Vol. 8 7, No. 7, January 2000

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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