25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO the Homepage Committee was planned for 9 Novem- ber 2000 to choose colors for the Winter Ball and to ber 2000. discuss making a bulletin board to display the photo Chapter Secretary Tracy McCormick is working contest picture. There were four raffl e winners chosen closely with Freedman to get the Storm Conference at the end of the meeting.—Tracy L. McCormick. mailings out. She will also be keeping an up-to-date The Pennsylvania State University list of those people who have already sent their regis- tration forms back to go to the conference in March. The 9 November 2000 meeting had a discussion The annual science fair is scheduled for 24 March with Hugh Willoughby, director of the Hurricane Re- 2001. The first science fair mailing was planned for search Division. The discussion by Willoughby fo- 14 November 2000. cuse d on the economic and human impact of Chapter Treasurer Cegeon Chan informed the club hurricanes on society and businesses. The main points that they would need a lot of help in setting up for the in his discussion were mortality in hurricanes and Winter Ball, planned for 27 January 2001. Chan re- where most of them come from, where property dam- marked that Freedman went to the college's House of age comes from, and the cost of warnings and fore- Representatives meeting, asked for money for the casting hurricanes. Willoughby discussed in depth Storm Conference by putting a powerpoint presenta- what causes the most damage in hurricanes and what tion together to explain the importance of this confer- causes the most loss of life. He said that the winds are ence, and ended up getting $1,000 from the general the primary result of most property damage, but the fund. major loss of life comes from the rain and flooding as- sociated with most hurricanes. A large number of these The photo contest ended 13 November 2000. The winners of this conference will have their picture on deaths from hurricanes are people that die in freshwa- the front of the Storm Conference booklet. The ter, and about one-third as many from saltwater deaths. Fundraising Committee planned to meet on 9 Novem- Willoughby pointed out that a large number of hurri- Cooperative U.S.-U.S.S.R. Balloon Flights As a means of implementing the bilateral agreement between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. on cooperation in the field of environmental protection, several working groups consisting of specialists from both countries were established. . . [Among their projects was] a cooperative field research venture conducted during July and August 1975 under working group VIII, a committee dealing with the influence of environmental changes on the climate. The site of the field work was the Soviet balloon base near Rylsk (pop. 20,000) about 500 km south of Moscow [. . .] The measurements themselves focused on the influence of aerosols on radiation in both the troposphere and stratosphere. One of the major experiments involved balloon flights car- rying both Soviet and American equipment: a dustsonde from U W and a particle impactor as well as an aerosol filter sampler supplied by the LSU group. [... ] The results of the field measurements are now being used to develop a detailed under- standing of the influence of aerosols and water vapor on radiation during the dates of the ex- periment. In addition, the cooperative balloon soundings provide an opportunity for a direct comparison of U.S. and U.S.S.R. techniques in the measurement of stratospheric aerosols. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 57, 225. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 34 3 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-82.2.343
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Abstract

the Homepage Committee was planned for 9 Novem- ber 2000 to choose colors for the Winter Ball and to ber 2000. discuss making a bulletin board to display the photo Chapter Secretary Tracy McCormick is working contest picture. There were four raffl e winners chosen closely with Freedman to get the Storm Conference at the end of the meeting.—Tracy L. McCormick. mailings out. She will also be keeping an up-to-date The Pennsylvania State University list of those people who have already sent their regis- tration forms back to go to the conference in March. The 9 November 2000 meeting had a discussion The annual science fair is scheduled for 24 March with Hugh Willoughby, director of the Hurricane Re- 2001. The first science fair mailing was planned for search Division. The discussion by Willoughby fo- 14 November 2000. cuse d on the economic and human impact of Chapter Treasurer Cegeon Chan informed the club hurricanes on society and businesses. The main points that they would need a lot of help in setting up for the in his discussion were mortality in hurricanes and Winter Ball, planned for 27 January 2001. Chan re- where most of them come from, where property dam- marked that Freedman went to the college's House of age comes from, and the cost of warnings and fore- Representatives meeting, asked for money for the casting hurricanes. Willoughby discussed in depth Storm Conference by putting a powerpoint presenta- what causes the most damage in hurricanes and what tion together to explain the importance of this confer- causes the most loss of life. He said that the winds are ence, and ended up getting $1,000 from the general the primary result of most property damage, but the fund. major loss of life comes from the rain and flooding as- sociated with most hurricanes. A large number of these The photo contest ended 13 November 2000. The winners of this conference will have their picture on deaths from hurricanes are people that die in freshwa- the front of the Storm Conference booklet. The ter, and about one-third as many from saltwater deaths. Fundraising Committee planned to meet on 9 Novem- Willoughby pointed out that a large number of hurri- Cooperative U.S.-U.S.S.R. Balloon Flights As a means of implementing the bilateral agreement between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. on cooperation in the field of environmental protection, several working groups consisting of specialists from both countries were established. . . [Among their projects was] a cooperative field research venture conducted during July and August 1975 under working group VIII, a committee dealing with the influence of environmental changes on the climate. The site of the field work was the Soviet balloon base near Rylsk (pop. 20,000) about 500 km south of Moscow [. . .] The measurements themselves focused on the influence of aerosols on radiation in both the troposphere and stratosphere. One of the major experiments involved balloon flights car- rying both Soviet and American equipment: a dustsonde from U W and a particle impactor as well as an aerosol filter sampler supplied by the LSU group. [... ] The results of the field measurements are now being used to develop a detailed under- standing of the influence of aerosols and water vapor on radiation during the dates of the ex- periment. In addition, the cooperative balloon soundings provide an opportunity for a direct comparison of U.S. and U.S.S.R. techniques in the measurement of stratospheric aerosols. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 57, 225. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 34 3

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Feb 1, 2001

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