25 years ago . . .

25 years ago . . . Bulletin American Meteorological Society Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists suggest. The inner core of an extremely intense storm For All Your moving up the Atlantic coast early last January po- sessed some of the structural and energetic charac- Meteorological teristics of mature tropical cyclones—hurricanes— Melvyn Shapiro of NOAA's Environmental Research Laboratories in Boulder, Colorado, has reported. System Surface wind speeds near 100 miles an hour en- circled a 60-mile-diameter cloud-free inner eye, air Requirements: temperatures within the warm inner core were about 50 degrees Fahrenheit higher than those outside the •Wind Speed/Direction Sensors core, the sea surface acted as an energy source & Indicators supplying heat and moisture to the storm, and an upper-level anticyclone outflow of air above the low- •Portable, Automatic, Self-Orienting level cyclonic inflow was present. These are all Weather Station typical characteristics of hurricanes. The storm occurred 4-5 January, and was consid- • Integrated Systems & Weather ered as a typical, albeit particularly powerful, Station Networks "nor'easter" severe weather event common to the northeastern United States and western Atlantic •ICAO CAT. II/IIIA Airport Weather Ocean during wintertime. It was the most explosive Stations western Atlantic storm development ever observed with research field observing systems. • •Specialty Wind Sensors for Microclimatological Research •Aspirated Shields, Towers & Accessories •Local & Remote Data Acquisitions • UHF/VHF Communications Systems Weather Bureau to Adopt Celsius Scale* •NIST Traceable Calibration & Repair Effective with the 0000 GMT synoptic observation on 1 January 1965 the temperature in group 4 and dew point in group 6 of the code Facilities for synoptic weather observations will be reported in degrees Celsius instead of degrees Fahrenheit. This action will bring the United States Climatronics Corp. has been serving the world into full compliance with recommended procedures of the World Me- meteorological community with quality ambient teorological Organization for the synoptic code (only the first six groups surface meteorological sensors and systems are exchanged internationally). Canada is expected to join the United for over 21 years. We offer a full line of States in a similar procedure. equipment from modular systems, which can The change does not in any way relate to aviation observations, nor be configured to meet most any requirement, does it involve the use of Celsius units in the general public service. to off-the-shelf packaged systems for more It relates only to the use of the Celsius scale for reporting current temperature in group 4 and current dew point in group 6 of the surface general applications. synoptic code. Temperatures will be reported in degrees Fahrenheit We at Climatronics are confident of our ability where they appear in other code groups. to serve all your meteorological requirements. Current temperature and dew point entries on 3 and 6 hourly surface For further information, contact any of our synoptic charts for transmission on the national weather facsimile cir- qualified sales engineers. cuits will be in degrees Fahrenheit. Transmissions of maximum and minimum temperature and facsimile charts of these and of forecast Over 21 years of MET product temperature change will continue to be in degrees Fahrenheit. research and development. Teletypewriter bulletins of local temperature prepared at Chicago will continue to be in degrees Fahrenheit with manual conversion there. The Daily Weather Map will continue to use Fahrenheit units (Occa- CLim n CORPORATION sional small "rounding" discrepancies will be present). The use of degrees Fahrenheit will be retained for punched cards. • 140 Wilbur Place, Airport Int'l. Plaza Bohemia, NY 11716 USA / 516-567-7300 Fax: 516-567-7585 TWX: 510-100-7669 * Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 45, 731. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

25 years ago . . .

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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-70.11.1469
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Abstract

Bulletin American Meteorological Society Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists suggest. The inner core of an extremely intense storm For All Your moving up the Atlantic coast early last January po- sessed some of the structural and energetic charac- Meteorological teristics of mature tropical cyclones—hurricanes— Melvyn Shapiro of NOAA's Environmental Research Laboratories in Boulder, Colorado, has reported. System Surface wind speeds near 100 miles an hour en- circled a 60-mile-diameter cloud-free inner eye, air Requirements: temperatures within the warm inner core were about 50 degrees Fahrenheit higher than those outside the •Wind Speed/Direction Sensors core, the sea surface acted as an energy source & Indicators supplying heat and moisture to the storm, and an upper-level anticyclone outflow of air above the low- •Portable, Automatic, Self-Orienting level cyclonic inflow was present. These are all Weather Station typical characteristics of hurricanes. The storm occurred 4-5 January, and was consid- • Integrated Systems & Weather ered as a typical, albeit particularly powerful, Station Networks "nor'easter" severe weather event common to the northeastern United States and western Atlantic •ICAO CAT. II/IIIA Airport Weather Ocean during wintertime. It was the most explosive Stations western Atlantic storm development ever observed with research field observing systems. • •Specialty Wind Sensors for Microclimatological Research •Aspirated Shields, Towers & Accessories •Local & Remote Data Acquisitions • UHF/VHF Communications Systems Weather Bureau to Adopt Celsius Scale* •NIST Traceable Calibration & Repair Effective with the 0000 GMT synoptic observation on 1 January 1965 the temperature in group 4 and dew point in group 6 of the code Facilities for synoptic weather observations will be reported in degrees Celsius instead of degrees Fahrenheit. This action will bring the United States Climatronics Corp. has been serving the world into full compliance with recommended procedures of the World Me- meteorological community with quality ambient teorological Organization for the synoptic code (only the first six groups surface meteorological sensors and systems are exchanged internationally). Canada is expected to join the United for over 21 years. We offer a full line of States in a similar procedure. equipment from modular systems, which can The change does not in any way relate to aviation observations, nor be configured to meet most any requirement, does it involve the use of Celsius units in the general public service. to off-the-shelf packaged systems for more It relates only to the use of the Celsius scale for reporting current temperature in group 4 and current dew point in group 6 of the surface general applications. synoptic code. Temperatures will be reported in degrees Fahrenheit We at Climatronics are confident of our ability where they appear in other code groups. to serve all your meteorological requirements. Current temperature and dew point entries on 3 and 6 hourly surface For further information, contact any of our synoptic charts for transmission on the national weather facsimile cir- qualified sales engineers. cuits will be in degrees Fahrenheit. Transmissions of maximum and minimum temperature and facsimile charts of these and of forecast Over 21 years of MET product temperature change will continue to be in degrees Fahrenheit. research and development. Teletypewriter bulletins of local temperature prepared at Chicago will continue to be in degrees Fahrenheit with manual conversion there. The Daily Weather Map will continue to use Fahrenheit units (Occa- CLim n CORPORATION sional small "rounding" discrepancies will be present). The use of degrees Fahrenheit will be retained for punched cards. • 140 Wilbur Place, Airport Int'l. Plaza Bohemia, NY 11716 USA / 516-567-7300 Fax: 516-567-7585 TWX: 510-100-7669 * Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 45, 731.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Nov 1, 1989

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