25 years ago

25 years ago ness, and education. Scientists from the U.S. Geologi- subject area based on many years of observing public cal Survey (USGS) will speak about earthquakes, reaction to life-threatening and destructive hurricanes. volcanoes, and landslides in the morning session. Other presentations will include those by representa- This information should contribute significantly to the tives of distinction from such organizations as the knowledge base of science reporters and others who American Red Cross, the emergency management field questions from the public on these topics, particu- community, and the broadcast media. The course will larly when disasters occur. The morning session will conclude with presentations by high level officials of conclude with a presentation on floods associated with the USGS, NWS, and the Federal Emergency Man- various disaster events, which will be given by a agement Agency on how their agency views will affect hydrologist from the National Weather Service. the wa y th e disaster prevention community will reactto Robert Sheets, director of the National Hurricane the natural disasters of the future. Center, will lead off the afternoon session, "Natural For more information or to sign up for the course, Disaster Awareness, Preparedness, and Education," contact Ed Gross, Chief, NWS Industrial Meteorology with a presentation highlighting his experience in the Staff, 301-713-0258. • Editor's note: The April 1968 Bulletin necrology section featured two men who were critical in the development of the institutional infrastructure in which meteorology has progressed dramatically in recent decades: Lloyd V. Berkner and Alan T. Waterman. Following is a portion of the necrology introduction, originally written by AMS Past President Earl G. Droessler. the history of the Earth's atmosphere. His work related Lloyd V. Berkner and Alan T. Waterman were two of the leading figures at the national level who moved the atmo- especially to the origin and stability of oxygen in the atmo- spheric sciences up toward the front ranks of science and sphere and was published in a series of scientific articles. technology. Both enjoyed an almost life-long personal and That he could maintain the pace of front line research up to professional interest in the atmospheric sciences and both the end, at age 62, is rare testimony to this remarkable man. exercised this interest at many times and in many ways for Alan Waterman's early interest in meteorology came the betterment of this science area. about partly as the result of his assignment to the weather battalion of the Signal Corps in World War I. Here, with The American Meteorological Society recognized their Robert A. Millekan, he pioneered in the development of unusual accomplishments and elected both to the esteemed atmospheric balloon sounding and balloon tracking. ranks of the AMS honorary membership. Additionally, the Cleveland Abbey Award, the Society's award for long and distinguished service to atmospheric sciences by an indi- vidual, was presented to both Berkner and Waterman. Berkner's interest in atmospheric sciences came about through his early studies of world-wide radio transmission and ionospheric research. He was a radio specialist with the Under early support of meteorology by the Office of Naval first Byrd Antarctic Expedition (1928-30). Thereafter he Research, Waterman, as deputy director and chief scientist, never lost his zeal for atmospheric research. While a re- first directed the attention of ONR to the work of Rossby at search associate with the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Chicago, Von Neumann at Princeton, Langmuir at General Berkner was a major contributor to the development of Electric, Houghton at MIT, and Macelwane at St. Louis. research in the ionosphere. Through these and other leaders in the field, ONR, in the As co-chairman with the late Dr. Carl-Gustaf Rossby, he mid-40s, encouraged the beginning of systematic federal support of university research in the weather sciences. organized the Committee on Meteorology of the National Academy of Sciences. After extended studies, this Commit- Later, as director of NSF, he continued and expanded the tee reported in 1957 a series of recommendations on re- base of this support for meteorological research by estab- search and education in meteorology. This report led directly lishing within NSF the Atmospheric Sciences Program, the to the National Center for Atmospheric Research at Boulder, National Weather Modification Research Program and the Colorado, the meteorology film program and other educa- principal contract support for the National Center for Atmo- tional programs in the AMS, and to a sizeable increase in the spheric Research. Around Waterman the NSF rallied the support of university research. needed federal government involvement and financial com- mitment which allowed the Center to become a reality and Remarkably enough, Berkner was in the midst of a new grow to the international reputation it enjoys today. His career in the atmospheric sciences which was ended by his simply stated advice to the fledgling atmospheric sciences untimely death. With Prof. L. C. Marshall he was working on program was, "Your biggest problem will be to plan large enough for the atmospheric sciences." Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 49 , 404 . Vol. 74, No. 4, April 1993 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

ness, and education. Scientists from the U.S. Geologi- subject area based on many years of observing public cal Survey (USGS) will speak about earthquakes, reaction to life-threatening and destructive hurricanes. volcanoes, and landslides in the morning session. Other presentations will include those by representa- This information should contribute significantly to the tives of distinction from such organizations as the knowledge base of science reporters and others who American Red Cross, the emergency management field questions from the public on these topics, particu- community, and the broadcast media. The course will larly when disasters occur. The morning session will conclude with presentations by high level officials of conclude with a presentation on floods associated with the USGS, NWS, and the Federal Emergency Man- various disaster events, which will be given by a agement Agency on how their agency views will affect hydrologist from the National Weather Service. the wa y th e disaster prevention community will reactto Robert Sheets, director of the National Hurricane the natural disasters of the future. Center, will lead off the afternoon session, "Natural For more information or to sign up for the course, Disaster Awareness, Preparedness, and Education," contact Ed Gross, Chief, NWS Industrial Meteorology with a presentation highlighting his experience in the Staff, 301-713-0258. • Editor's note: The April 1968 Bulletin necrology section featured two men who were critical in the development of the institutional infrastructure in which meteorology has progressed dramatically in recent decades: Lloyd V. Berkner and Alan T. Waterman. Following is a portion of the necrology introduction, originally written by AMS Past President Earl G. Droessler. the history of the Earth's atmosphere. His work related Lloyd V. Berkner and Alan T. Waterman were two of the leading figures at the national level who moved the atmo- especially to the origin and stability of oxygen in the atmo- spheric sciences up toward the front ranks of science and sphere and was published in a series of scientific articles. technology. Both enjoyed an almost life-long personal and That he could maintain the pace of front line research up to professional interest in the atmospheric sciences and both the end, at age 62, is rare testimony to this remarkable man. exercised this interest at many times and in many ways for Alan Waterman's early interest in meteorology came the betterment of this science area. about partly as the result of his assignment to the weather battalion of the Signal Corps in World War I. Here, with The American Meteorological Society recognized their Robert A. Millekan, he pioneered in the development of unusual accomplishments and elected both to the esteemed atmospheric balloon sounding and balloon tracking. ranks of the AMS honorary membership. Additionally, the Cleveland Abbey Award, the Society's award for long and distinguished service to atmospheric sciences by an indi- vidual, was presented to both Berkner and Waterman. Berkner's interest in atmospheric sciences came about through his early studies of world-wide radio transmission and ionospheric research. He was a radio specialist with the Under early support of meteorology by the Office of Naval first Byrd Antarctic Expedition (1928-30). Thereafter he Research, Waterman, as deputy director and chief scientist, never lost his zeal for atmospheric research. While a re- first directed the attention of ONR to the work of Rossby at search associate with the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Chicago, Von Neumann at Princeton, Langmuir at General Berkner was a major contributor to the development of Electric, Houghton at MIT, and Macelwane at St. Louis. research in the ionosphere. Through these and other leaders in the field, ONR, in the As co-chairman with the late Dr. Carl-Gustaf Rossby, he mid-40s, encouraged the beginning of systematic federal support of university research in the weather sciences. organized the Committee on Meteorology of the National Academy of Sciences. After extended studies, this Commit- Later, as director of NSF, he continued and expanded the tee reported in 1957 a series of recommendations on re- base of this support for meteorological research by estab- search and education in meteorology. This report led directly lishing within NSF the Atmospheric Sciences Program, the to the National Center for Atmospheric Research at Boulder, National Weather Modification Research Program and the Colorado, the meteorology film program and other educa- principal contract support for the National Center for Atmo- tional programs in the AMS, and to a sizeable increase in the spheric Research. Around Waterman the NSF rallied the support of university research. needed federal government involvement and financial com- mitment which allowed the Center to become a reality and Remarkably enough, Berkner was in the midst of a new grow to the international reputation it enjoys today. His career in the atmospheric sciences which was ended by his simply stated advice to the fledgling atmospheric sciences untimely death. With Prof. L. C. Marshall he was working on program was, "Your biggest problem will be to plan large enough for the atmospheric sciences." Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 49 , 404 . Vol. 74, No. 4, April 1993

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