25 years ago

25 years ago meteorologists. He explained that the survey was The March 1993 meeting was held at Fischer's designed to determine how broadcasters use thermal Restaurant in Belleville, Illinois. Morris Weisman, a comfort indices (TCIs) to communicate the effects of researcher at the National Center for Atmospheric hot and cold weather to the general public. His results Research (NCAR), was the guest speaker. Weisman showed that many broadcast meteorologists misuse began his presentation with a brief overview of NCAR, much of the terminology dealing with TCIs, causing stating that research covers topics from global general confusion. Driscoll concluded that there is a need for circulation to thunderstorms. Weisman said that he is a new universal system to be developed that would be involved in the latter. Because of the difficulty gather- more easily understood by the public. ing direct observations inside actual thunderstorms, Weisman said that he concentrates on using numeri- Greater St. Louis cal models to study severe local storms. Despite the storms' complexity, visual aspects of thunderstorms Members met at Wolfgang's Brewery and Restau- can yield clues to what thermodynamic processes rant in O'Fallon, Illinois, for their January 1993 meet- there are at work. Structure in a storm (shelf cloud, ing. Robert Hart of the Surface Systems Inc., St. rotation) indicates organization and a possible severe Louis, Missouri, spoke on Surface Systems "Remote storm. Weather Sensing and Forecasting for the Transporta- According to Weisman, thunderstorms can range tion Industry" program. Hart began his presentation by in size from the airmass variety that lasts less than an showing slides depicting the sensor's structure and hour to the supercell that can last for several hours and physical locations. He then passed around a few of the generate tornadoes. In recent years small tornadoes sensors for examination. According to Hart, the infor- called "land spouts" have been seen along the Front mation gathered by these sensors is passed by tele- Range of the Rockies. Weisman explained that, unlike phone lines to a computer that provides a series of traditional tornadic storms, land spouts are associ- information screens or printouts. The information is ated with little or no rain and are short-lived, and the precisely the tool that a maintenance supervisor needs rotation starts near the ground. to make a more cost-effective decision regarding snow and ice removal. Supercells, however, are long-lived storms that Editor's note: The "About Our Members" feature in the November 1968 Bulletin included, among others, the following items. After receiving his doctorate at the University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo., Dr. Ernest M.Agee joined the staff of the Department of Geosciences, Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind. On completing studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis., Richard A. Anthes accepted employment with the National Hurricane Research Laboratory, Coral Gables, Fla. Russell L. Elsberry has left the Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, Colo., to join the staff of the Department of Meteorology, U. S. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Calif. Paul H. Kutschenreuter, ESSA deputy assistant administrator for plans and programs and chief of the User Affairs Group since 1967, has been appointed director of the Weather Bureau's Pacific Region, succeeding James W. Osmun. Before 1967 Mr. Kutschenreuter was director of ESSA's User Affairs Office. Since he entered the Weather Bureau in 1926, he has served at stations in Texas, Alabama, Utah, Montana, Washington, Illinois, Massachusetts, Florida, New York, and Wash- ington, D. C. In 1955 he became assistant to the Chief of Bureau for Forecasting Services, and in 1960 was named assistant chief of the Weather Bureau. He has served as U. S. delegate to WMO meetings in several foreign countries and was president of the WMO Commission for Synoptic Meteorology 1958-1962. Most recently he headed the U. S. delegation to the WMO Commission on Marine Meteorology's 5th session, held at the University of Rhode Island in August. He assumed his new duties in Honolulu on 30 September 1968. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 49, 1069-1071. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 2129 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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Abstract

meteorologists. He explained that the survey was The March 1993 meeting was held at Fischer's designed to determine how broadcasters use thermal Restaurant in Belleville, Illinois. Morris Weisman, a comfort indices (TCIs) to communicate the effects of researcher at the National Center for Atmospheric hot and cold weather to the general public. His results Research (NCAR), was the guest speaker. Weisman showed that many broadcast meteorologists misuse began his presentation with a brief overview of NCAR, much of the terminology dealing with TCIs, causing stating that research covers topics from global general confusion. Driscoll concluded that there is a need for circulation to thunderstorms. Weisman said that he is a new universal system to be developed that would be involved in the latter. Because of the difficulty gather- more easily understood by the public. ing direct observations inside actual thunderstorms, Weisman said that he concentrates on using numeri- Greater St. Louis cal models to study severe local storms. Despite the storms' complexity, visual aspects of thunderstorms Members met at Wolfgang's Brewery and Restau- can yield clues to what thermodynamic processes rant in O'Fallon, Illinois, for their January 1993 meet- there are at work. Structure in a storm (shelf cloud, ing. Robert Hart of the Surface Systems Inc., St. rotation) indicates organization and a possible severe Louis, Missouri, spoke on Surface Systems "Remote storm. Weather Sensing and Forecasting for the Transporta- According to Weisman, thunderstorms can range tion Industry" program. Hart began his presentation by in size from the airmass variety that lasts less than an showing slides depicting the sensor's structure and hour to the supercell that can last for several hours and physical locations. He then passed around a few of the generate tornadoes. In recent years small tornadoes sensors for examination. According to Hart, the infor- called "land spouts" have been seen along the Front mation gathered by these sensors is passed by tele- Range of the Rockies. Weisman explained that, unlike phone lines to a computer that provides a series of traditional tornadic storms, land spouts are associ- information screens or printouts. The information is ated with little or no rain and are short-lived, and the precisely the tool that a maintenance supervisor needs rotation starts near the ground. to make a more cost-effective decision regarding snow and ice removal. Supercells, however, are long-lived storms that Editor's note: The "About Our Members" feature in the November 1968 Bulletin included, among others, the following items. After receiving his doctorate at the University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo., Dr. Ernest M.Agee joined the staff of the Department of Geosciences, Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind. On completing studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis., Richard A. Anthes accepted employment with the National Hurricane Research Laboratory, Coral Gables, Fla. Russell L. Elsberry has left the Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, Colo., to join the staff of the Department of Meteorology, U. S. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Calif. Paul H. Kutschenreuter, ESSA deputy assistant administrator for plans and programs and chief of the User Affairs Group since 1967, has been appointed director of the Weather Bureau's Pacific Region, succeeding James W. Osmun. Before 1967 Mr. Kutschenreuter was director of ESSA's User Affairs Office. Since he entered the Weather Bureau in 1926, he has served at stations in Texas, Alabama, Utah, Montana, Washington, Illinois, Massachusetts, Florida, New York, and Wash- ington, D. C. In 1955 he became assistant to the Chief of Bureau for Forecasting Services, and in 1960 was named assistant chief of the Weather Bureau. He has served as U. S. delegate to WMO meetings in several foreign countries and was president of the WMO Commission for Synoptic Meteorology 1958-1962. Most recently he headed the U. S. delegation to the WMO Commission on Marine Meteorology's 5th session, held at the University of Rhode Island in August. He assumed his new duties in Honolulu on 30 September 1968. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 49, 1069-1071. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 2129

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Nov 1, 1993

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