25 years ago

25 years ago conditions on a regional level, enabling scientists to piece together a picture of global atmospheric condi- Yamad Yamad a a Scienc Sciencee & & tions. A commercial satellite company has agreed to Ar Art t Corporatio Corporation n launch a low-earth orbit satellite receiver under the auspices of the University Navstar Consortium, a group of 46 research institutions that use the GPS for HOTMAC / RAPTAD (New Version) science applications. The group is seeking additional ^ 3-D atmospheric modeling funding for the project's other costs. Airflow over complex terrain As uses for the GPS have expanded, geophysi- cists are using it to measure the motion of earth's Diffusion & transport simulations crust, including earthquakes. GPS surveys can fix RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT positions with an accuracy of about one centimeter, • Advanced turbulence modeling and the earth's crust typically moves several centime- • Precipitation / fog forecast ters each year. The system can measure the relative CONSULTING distance, or the distance between two points, even better than it can determine the location of any single ^ Environmental assessments point. ^ Case studies Begun in the mid-1980s, the GPS was originally designed to gather very precise data on positioning See us at Booth # 639 for navigation of both military and civilian vehicles. AWMA Annual Meeting & Exhibition There are now 19 satellites in place. Next year the at Colorado Convention Center system will be complete with 21 satellites. For additional information, contact Laura Herbst, Denver, June 15-17, 1993 North Carolina State University Information Services, 147 Monte Rey Dr. S., Los Alamos, NM 87544 NCSU, Box 7504, Raleigh, NC 27695; phone: 919- 515-3470. • Phone: (505) 672-3373 Fax: (505) 672-1910 Editor's note: More than 30 pages of the May 1968 Bulletin were devoted to the Harry Wexler Memorial Lecture presented by Jerome Namias at the preceding January meeting of the Society in San Francisco. In Namias's own words: "We [Harry and he] were close friends—and at times competitors—throughout grammar, junior high, and high school. We lived a few blocks from each other in Fall River, Massachusetts, were members of the same Boy Scout troop, dated together, married sis- ters, and carried on the major part of our careers in the U.S. Weather Bureau."The lecture dealt with long- range weather forecasting, its his- tory, current status and outlook and was accompanied by this notewor- Photo taken in front of the ENIAC, Aberdeen Proving Ground, 4 April 1950, on occasion of thy photograph, the first numerical weather computations carried out with aid of a high-speed automatic computer. (Pictured left to right: H. Wexler, J. von Neumann, M. H. Frankel, J. Namias, J. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 49, 439. C. Freeman, R. Fjortoft, F. W. Reichelderfer and J. G. Charney.) 914 Vol. 74, No. 5, May 1993 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-74.5.914
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Abstract

conditions on a regional level, enabling scientists to piece together a picture of global atmospheric condi- Yamad Yamad a a Scienc Sciencee & & tions. A commercial satellite company has agreed to Ar Art t Corporatio Corporation n launch a low-earth orbit satellite receiver under the auspices of the University Navstar Consortium, a group of 46 research institutions that use the GPS for HOTMAC / RAPTAD (New Version) science applications. The group is seeking additional ^ 3-D atmospheric modeling funding for the project's other costs. Airflow over complex terrain As uses for the GPS have expanded, geophysi- cists are using it to measure the motion of earth's Diffusion & transport simulations crust, including earthquakes. GPS surveys can fix RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT positions with an accuracy of about one centimeter, • Advanced turbulence modeling and the earth's crust typically moves several centime- • Precipitation / fog forecast ters each year. The system can measure the relative CONSULTING distance, or the distance between two points, even better than it can determine the location of any single ^ Environmental assessments point. ^ Case studies Begun in the mid-1980s, the GPS was originally designed to gather very precise data on positioning See us at Booth # 639 for navigation of both military and civilian vehicles. AWMA Annual Meeting & Exhibition There are now 19 satellites in place. Next year the at Colorado Convention Center system will be complete with 21 satellites. For additional information, contact Laura Herbst, Denver, June 15-17, 1993 North Carolina State University Information Services, 147 Monte Rey Dr. S., Los Alamos, NM 87544 NCSU, Box 7504, Raleigh, NC 27695; phone: 919- 515-3470. • Phone: (505) 672-3373 Fax: (505) 672-1910 Editor's note: More than 30 pages of the May 1968 Bulletin were devoted to the Harry Wexler Memorial Lecture presented by Jerome Namias at the preceding January meeting of the Society in San Francisco. In Namias's own words: "We [Harry and he] were close friends—and at times competitors—throughout grammar, junior high, and high school. We lived a few blocks from each other in Fall River, Massachusetts, were members of the same Boy Scout troop, dated together, married sis- ters, and carried on the major part of our careers in the U.S. Weather Bureau."The lecture dealt with long- range weather forecasting, its his- tory, current status and outlook and was accompanied by this notewor- Photo taken in front of the ENIAC, Aberdeen Proving Ground, 4 April 1950, on occasion of thy photograph, the first numerical weather computations carried out with aid of a high-speed automatic computer. (Pictured left to right: H. Wexler, J. von Neumann, M. H. Frankel, J. Namias, J. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 49, 439. C. Freeman, R. Fjortoft, F. W. Reichelderfer and J. G. Charney.) 914 Vol. 74, No. 5, May 1993

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: May 1, 1993

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