25 YEARS AGO

25 YEARS AGO t o move to Asheville was the New Orleans, Louisi- ter year. Ne w officers includ e Jeff Wilhelm, president; ana, Tabulating Data Unit for military and civilian Joh n Wetherbee, president-elect; Jean Graham, secre- normal s in 1951. In 1955, the Washington-New tary; and Doug Fulle, treasurer. Hampshir e Map Unit was added. In 1962 the Chart Followin g chapter elections, Sieland presented Regiona l centers from San Francisco and Kansas City award s to a number of chapter members. The C. L. move d to Asheville and in 1974 the Satellite Informa- Chandle r Award, which is awarded to a group or in- tion unit was added. dividua l who has contributed the most to foster and Accordin g to Hughes, the combination of these enhanc e the science of meteorology in the Atlanta area move s made the NCD C the largest worldwide orga- durin g the past year, was presented to Patricia nizatio n of its kind. It is solely responsible for Warthan . Warthan is the organizer of a Loca l Imple- archiving , compiling, and exchanging most of the mentatio n Team (LIT) fo r Projec t DataStrem e in the weathe r informatio n derived b y civilians and govern- Atlant a metropolitan area. She enrolled five teachers men t employees in the United States and its entities. in a meteorolog y course on the Internet, whic h is pro- It also produces and publishes a numbe r of climato- logical summaries. 20% More C0 by Year 2000 Afte r th e presentation by Hughes, chapter elections wer e held. Ne w officers are Thoma s Johnstone, me- A model developed by Dr. Lester Machta, teorologist with the NWS , chair; Carlton Ulbrich, pro- Hea d of the Air Resources Laboratories in the fesso r at Clemson University, vice chair; Richard Nationa l Oceanic and Atmo- Neal, meteorologist with the NWS , secretary; and Jeff spheri c Administration, esti- Zoltowski , meteorologist intern with the NWS , trea- mates that b y the year 200 0 there surer.—Richard Neal wil l be a 20% increase in the amoun t of atmospheric C0 . Metropolitan Atlanta Use d in conjunction with eco- Jef f Wilhel m was the guest speaker at th e 17 April nomi c analyses of futur e world- 1997 chapter meeting. Wilhelm began his presenta- wid e fossil fue l consumption, tion, "Evolution in Militar y Weather, " with an expla- the mode l predicts that there will nation of ho w technology has continued to chang e the b e a 20 % increase by 2000 A.D. over the 1970 fac e of military weather, particularly in the past five figur e of 322 pp m of C0 . (See Dr . Machta' s ar- years . He described his recent visit to the Combat ticle on "Mauna Loa and Global Trends in Air Weathe r Center at Hurlbert Field, Florida, and the Quality " in the Ma y 1972 BULLETIN.) amoun t of moder n field equipmen t the center wa s us- Scientists studying the possible greenhouse ing. Wilhel m said that by using the same technology effec t of a C0 increase over the past decade have in the offic e as in the field, comba t weather forces can foun d that despite the expected warming, ground no w train and wor k at their homebas e the same as they level air of the Northern Hemisphere has actu- woul d in the field. Arme d with laptops, H F data/fax ally cooled since the mid-1940s . It is one factor machines , and tactical satellite receivers capable of amon g many that determine the tropo spheri c trackin g polar-orbiting weather satellites, air force temperature . Figures used to estimat e fossil fue l weathe r personnel are no w able to deploy and estab- consumption suggest that betwee n no w and 1980 lish a fully functional weather station in a matter of consumptio n will increase about 4% annually, hours . whil e after that fro m 1980 to 2000, the increase Chapte r members convened at the Dobbins Air will be about 35% annually because of the in- Forc e Base for their annual banquet on 8 Ma y 1997. crease d use of nuclear power. Durin g a short business meeting, Chapter President Th e Scripps Institution of Oceanograph y in a To m Sieland discussed the status of Project poin t program with NOA A will document the DataStreme , announced the winners of the April fore- globa l build-up of C0 in a planne d monitoring cas t contest (Don Farrington received first, with Doug 2 program . Full e and David McEvers receiving second), and dis- tributed copies of the chapter survey and the most up- to-dat e mailing list. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 53, 827. Chapter elections were held for the 1997/98 chap- Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 181 5 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

t o move to Asheville was the New Orleans, Louisi- ter year. Ne w officers includ e Jeff Wilhelm, president; ana, Tabulating Data Unit for military and civilian Joh n Wetherbee, president-elect; Jean Graham, secre- normal s in 1951. In 1955, the Washington-New tary; and Doug Fulle, treasurer. Hampshir e Map Unit was added. In 1962 the Chart Followin g chapter elections, Sieland presented Regiona l centers from San Francisco and Kansas City award s to a number of chapter members. The C. L. move d to Asheville and in 1974 the Satellite Informa- Chandle r Award, which is awarded to a group or in- tion unit was added. dividua l who has contributed the most to foster and Accordin g to Hughes, the combination of these enhanc e the science of meteorology in the Atlanta area move s made the NCD C the largest worldwide orga- durin g the past year, was presented to Patricia nizatio n of its kind. It is solely responsible for Warthan . Warthan is the organizer of a Loca l Imple- archiving , compiling, and exchanging most of the mentatio n Team (LIT) fo r Projec t DataStrem e in the weathe r informatio n derived b y civilians and govern- Atlant a metropolitan area. She enrolled five teachers men t employees in the United States and its entities. in a meteorolog y course on the Internet, whic h is pro- It also produces and publishes a numbe r of climato- logical summaries. 20% More C0 by Year 2000 Afte r th e presentation by Hughes, chapter elections wer e held. Ne w officers are Thoma s Johnstone, me- A model developed by Dr. Lester Machta, teorologist with the NWS , chair; Carlton Ulbrich, pro- Hea d of the Air Resources Laboratories in the fesso r at Clemson University, vice chair; Richard Nationa l Oceanic and Atmo- Neal, meteorologist with the NWS , secretary; and Jeff spheri c Administration, esti- Zoltowski , meteorologist intern with the NWS , trea- mates that b y the year 200 0 there surer.—Richard Neal wil l be a 20% increase in the amoun t of atmospheric C0 . Metropolitan Atlanta Use d in conjunction with eco- Jef f Wilhel m was the guest speaker at th e 17 April nomi c analyses of futur e world- 1997 chapter meeting. Wilhelm began his presenta- wid e fossil fue l consumption, tion, "Evolution in Militar y Weather, " with an expla- the mode l predicts that there will nation of ho w technology has continued to chang e the b e a 20 % increase by 2000 A.D. over the 1970 fac e of military weather, particularly in the past five figur e of 322 pp m of C0 . (See Dr . Machta' s ar- years . He described his recent visit to the Combat ticle on "Mauna Loa and Global Trends in Air Weathe r Center at Hurlbert Field, Florida, and the Quality " in the Ma y 1972 BULLETIN.) amoun t of moder n field equipmen t the center wa s us- Scientists studying the possible greenhouse ing. Wilhel m said that by using the same technology effec t of a C0 increase over the past decade have in the offic e as in the field, comba t weather forces can foun d that despite the expected warming, ground no w train and wor k at their homebas e the same as they level air of the Northern Hemisphere has actu- woul d in the field. Arme d with laptops, H F data/fax ally cooled since the mid-1940s . It is one factor machines , and tactical satellite receivers capable of amon g many that determine the tropo spheri c trackin g polar-orbiting weather satellites, air force temperature . Figures used to estimat e fossil fue l weathe r personnel are no w able to deploy and estab- consumption suggest that betwee n no w and 1980 lish a fully functional weather station in a matter of consumptio n will increase about 4% annually, hours . whil e after that fro m 1980 to 2000, the increase Chapte r members convened at the Dobbins Air will be about 35% annually because of the in- Forc e Base for their annual banquet on 8 Ma y 1997. crease d use of nuclear power. Durin g a short business meeting, Chapter President Th e Scripps Institution of Oceanograph y in a To m Sieland discussed the status of Project poin t program with NOA A will document the DataStreme , announced the winners of the April fore- globa l build-up of C0 in a planne d monitoring cas t contest (Don Farrington received first, with Doug 2 program . Full e and David McEvers receiving second), and dis- tributed copies of the chapter survey and the most up- to-dat e mailing list. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 53, 827. Chapter elections were held for the 1997/98 chap- Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 181 5

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Aug 1, 1997

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