Transport of Nitrogen in the Xylem of Soybean Plants

Transport of Nitrogen in the Xylem of Soybean Plants Experiments were conducted to characterize the distribution of N compounds in the xylem sap of nodulated and nonnodulated soybean plants through development and to determine the effects of exogenous N on the distribution of N compounds in the xylem. Xylem sap was collected from nodulated and nonnodulated greenhouse-grown soybean plants ( Glycine max (L.) Merr. “Ransom”) from the vegetative phase to the pod-filling phase. The sum of the nitrogen in the amino acid, nitrate, ureide (allantoic acid and allantoin), and ammonium fractions of the sap from both types of plants agreed closely with total N as assayed by a Kjeldahl technique. Sap from nodulated plants supplied with N-free nutrient solution contained seasonal averages of 78 and 20% of the total N as ureide-N and amino acid-N, respectively. Sap from nonnodulated plants supplied with a 20 millimolar KNO 3 nutrient solution contained seasonal averages of 6, 36, and 58% of total N as ureide-N, amino acid-N, and nitrate-N, respectively. Allantoic acid was the predominant ureide in the xylem sap and asparagine was the predominant amino acid. When well nodulated plants were supplied with 20 millimolar KNO 3 , beginning at 65 days, C 2 H 2 reduction (N 2 fixation) decreased relative to nontreated plants and there was a concomitant decrease in the ureide content of the sap. A positive correlation ( r = 0.89) was found between the ureide levels in xylem sap and nodule dry weights when either exogenous nitrate-N or urea-N was supplied at 10 and 20 millimolar concentrations to inoculated plants. The results demonstrate that ureides play a dominant role in N transport in nodulated soybeans and that the synthesis of ureides is largely dependent upon nodulation and N 2 fixation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Transport of Nitrogen in the Xylem of Soybean Plants

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Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologist
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 by the American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN
1532-2548
eISSN
0032-0889
DOI
10.1104/pp.64.3.411
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Experiments were conducted to characterize the distribution of N compounds in the xylem sap of nodulated and nonnodulated soybean plants through development and to determine the effects of exogenous N on the distribution of N compounds in the xylem. Xylem sap was collected from nodulated and nonnodulated greenhouse-grown soybean plants ( Glycine max (L.) Merr. “Ransom”) from the vegetative phase to the pod-filling phase. The sum of the nitrogen in the amino acid, nitrate, ureide (allantoic acid and allantoin), and ammonium fractions of the sap from both types of plants agreed closely with total N as assayed by a Kjeldahl technique. Sap from nodulated plants supplied with N-free nutrient solution contained seasonal averages of 78 and 20% of the total N as ureide-N and amino acid-N, respectively. Sap from nonnodulated plants supplied with a 20 millimolar KNO 3 nutrient solution contained seasonal averages of 6, 36, and 58% of total N as ureide-N, amino acid-N, and nitrate-N, respectively. Allantoic acid was the predominant ureide in the xylem sap and asparagine was the predominant amino acid. When well nodulated plants were supplied with 20 millimolar KNO 3 , beginning at 65 days, C 2 H 2 reduction (N 2 fixation) decreased relative to nontreated plants and there was a concomitant decrease in the ureide content of the sap. A positive correlation ( r = 0.89) was found between the ureide levels in xylem sap and nodule dry weights when either exogenous nitrate-N or urea-N was supplied at 10 and 20 millimolar concentrations to inoculated plants. The results demonstrate that ureides play a dominant role in N transport in nodulated soybeans and that the synthesis of ureides is largely dependent upon nodulation and N 2 fixation.

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