Transcriptional Regulators and the Evolution of Plant Form

Transcriptional Regulators and the Evolution of Plant Form John Doebley a and Lewis Lukens a a Department of Plant Biology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota 55108 Correspondence to: John Doebley, doebley@maroon.tc.umn.edu (E-mail), 612-625-1738 (fax). INTRODUCTION TOP INTRODUCTION "REGULATORY GENES" AND EVOLUTION EARLY EVIDENCE FOR REGULATORY... CONSERVATION OF PROTEIN FUNCTION EVOLUTION BY CHANGES IN... SIGNALS, TRANSDUCERS,... TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATORS AND... DEVELOPMENTAL PATHWAYS AND... BEYOND THEORY: GENETICS AND... CONCLUSION REFERENCES The modern or neo-Darwinian theory of evolution was formulated well over half a century ago at a time when genes were abstractions and development was understood only as the transition between a series of phenotypic states. Since that time, our knowledge of the gene, the diversity of types of genes, the interactions among genes, and the organization of genes into the networks and hierarchies that regulate development has grown enormously. Although still incomplete, this burgeoning knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that regulate ontogeny compels a continual reassessment of the question: How did the diversity of forms of life on earth evolve? Darwin resolved this question at the ecological level by explaining how natural selection would favor the "fittest" forms within a specific environmental context. The neo-Darwinian synthesis resolved this question at the genetic level by showing how the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Transcriptional Regulators and the Evolution of Plant Form

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-society-of-plant-biologist/transcriptional-regulators-and-the-evolution-of-plant-form-SdIY6307WX
Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologist
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN
1040-4651
eISSN
1532-298X
D.O.I.
10.1105/tpc.10.7.1075
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

John Doebley a and Lewis Lukens a a Department of Plant Biology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota 55108 Correspondence to: John Doebley, doebley@maroon.tc.umn.edu (E-mail), 612-625-1738 (fax). INTRODUCTION TOP INTRODUCTION "REGULATORY GENES" AND EVOLUTION EARLY EVIDENCE FOR REGULATORY... CONSERVATION OF PROTEIN FUNCTION EVOLUTION BY CHANGES IN... SIGNALS, TRANSDUCERS,... TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATORS AND... DEVELOPMENTAL PATHWAYS AND... BEYOND THEORY: GENETICS AND... CONCLUSION REFERENCES The modern or neo-Darwinian theory of evolution was formulated well over half a century ago at a time when genes were abstractions and development was understood only as the transition between a series of phenotypic states. Since that time, our knowledge of the gene, the diversity of types of genes, the interactions among genes, and the organization of genes into the networks and hierarchies that regulate development has grown enormously. Although still incomplete, this burgeoning knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that regulate ontogeny compels a continual reassessment of the question: How did the diversity of forms of life on earth evolve? Darwin resolved this question at the ecological level by explaining how natural selection would favor the "fittest" forms within a specific environmental context. The neo-Darwinian synthesis resolved this question at the genetic level by showing how the

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off