The Effect of Light on the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Green Leaves I. Relative Rates of the Cycle in the Dark and the Light

The Effect of Light on the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Green Leaves I. Relative Rates of the... E. A. Chapman and D. Graham a Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Division of Food Research, and School of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde 2113, Sydney, Australia Abstract Excised green leaves of mung bean ( Phaseolus aureus L. var. Mungo) were used to determine the effect of light on the rate of endogenous respiration via the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Illumination with white light at an intensity of 0.043 gram calories cm −2 min −1 (approximately 8600 lux) of visible radiation (400-700 nm) gave a rate of apparent photosynthesis, measured as net CO 2 uptake, of 21 mg CO 2 dm −2 hr −1 which was about 11-fold greater than the rate of dark respiration. The feeding of 14 CO 2 or 14 C-labeled acids of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dark for 2 hours was established as a suitable method for labeling mitochondrial pools of cycle intermediates. At a concentration of 0.1 m m 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, apparent photosynthesis was inhibited 82%, and the refixation of 14 CO 2 derived internally from endogenous respiration was largely prevented. In the presence of this inhibitor endogenous respiration, measured as 14 CO 2 evolution, continued in the light at a rate comparable to that in the dark. Consequently, under these conditions light-induced nonphotosynthetic processes have no significant effect on endogenous dark respiration. Inhibitors of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, malonate and fluoroacetate, were used to determine the relative rates of carbon flux through the cycle in the dark and in the light by measuring the rate of accumulation of 14 C in either succinate or citrate. Results were interpreted to indicate that the tricarboxylic acid cycle functions in the light at a rate similar to that in the dark except for a brief initial inhibition on transition from dark to light. Evidence was obtained that succinate dehydrogenase as well as aconitase, was inhibited in the presence of fluoroacetate. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Effect of Light on the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Green Leaves I. Relative Rates of the Cycle in the Dark and the Light

Jun 1, 1974

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Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologist
Copyright
Copyright © 1974 by the American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN
1532-2548
eISSN
0032-0889
DOI
10.1104/pp.53.6.879
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

E. A. Chapman and D. Graham a Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Division of Food Research, and School of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde 2113, Sydney, Australia Abstract Excised green leaves of mung bean ( Phaseolus aureus L. var. Mungo) were used to determine the effect of light on the rate of endogenous respiration via the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Illumination with white light at an intensity of 0.043 gram calories cm −2 min −1 (approximately 8600 lux) of visible radiation (400-700 nm) gave a rate of apparent photosynthesis, measured as net CO 2 uptake, of 21 mg CO 2 dm −2 hr −1 which was about 11-fold greater than the rate of dark respiration. The feeding of 14 CO 2 or 14 C-labeled acids of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dark for 2 hours was established as a suitable method for labeling mitochondrial pools of cycle intermediates. At a concentration of 0.1 m m 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, apparent photosynthesis was inhibited 82%, and the refixation of 14 CO 2 derived internally from endogenous respiration was largely prevented. In the presence of this inhibitor endogenous respiration, measured as 14 CO 2 evolution, continued in the light at a rate comparable to that in the dark. Consequently, under these conditions light-induced nonphotosynthetic processes have no significant effect on endogenous dark respiration. Inhibitors of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, malonate and fluoroacetate, were used to determine the relative rates of carbon flux through the cycle in the dark and in the light by measuring the rate of accumulation of 14 C in either succinate or citrate. Results were interpreted to indicate that the tricarboxylic acid cycle functions in the light at a rate similar to that in the dark except for a brief initial inhibition on transition from dark to light. Evidence was obtained that succinate dehydrogenase as well as aconitase, was inhibited in the presence of fluoroacetate.

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