The Compartmentation of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in Plants

The Compartmentation of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in Plants Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan Although the biochemical pathways for fatty acid synthesis are more or less similar in plants and animals (Harwood, 1988), there is a major cell biological difference between these two groups of eukaryotes. In plants, the major site of fatty acid synthesis is the plastid, an organelle absent from the animal cell. Many aspects of plastid biology, including fatty acid synthesis, reflect the organelle's origins as a prokaryotic symbiont. The synthesis of fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, the prototype 16-carbon fatty acid, requires one molecule of acetyl-COA and seven molecules of malonyl-COA, which are added sequentially with the addition of two carbons to the growing fatty acid chain and the release of CO, at each step. These reactions are catalyzed by fatty acid synthase, an enzyme complex known to exist in a prokaryotic and a eukaryotic form (Wakil et al., 1983; Harwood, 1988). The prokaryotic form (type 11) of fatty acid synthase is found in plants. The synthase is composed of severa1 dissociable proteins, whereas the eukaryotic form (type I) found in animals and yeasts is composed of one or two large multifunctional, nondissociable proteins. For either http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Compartmentation of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in Plants

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Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologist
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by the American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN
1532-2548
eISSN
0032-0889
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan Although the biochemical pathways for fatty acid synthesis are more or less similar in plants and animals (Harwood, 1988), there is a major cell biological difference between these two groups of eukaryotes. In plants, the major site of fatty acid synthesis is the plastid, an organelle absent from the animal cell. Many aspects of plastid biology, including fatty acid synthesis, reflect the organelle's origins as a prokaryotic symbiont. The synthesis of fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, the prototype 16-carbon fatty acid, requires one molecule of acetyl-COA and seven molecules of malonyl-COA, which are added sequentially with the addition of two carbons to the growing fatty acid chain and the release of CO, at each step. These reactions are catalyzed by fatty acid synthase, an enzyme complex known to exist in a prokaryotic and a eukaryotic form (Wakil et al., 1983; Harwood, 1988). The prokaryotic form (type 11) of fatty acid synthase is found in plants. The synthase is composed of severa1 dissociable proteins, whereas the eukaryotic form (type I) found in animals and yeasts is composed of one or two large multifunctional, nondissociable proteins. For either

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