Regulation of K+ Channels in Maize Roots by Water Stress and Abscisic Acid

Regulation of K+ Channels in Maize Roots by Water Stress and Abscisic Acid Root cortical and stelar protoplasts were isolated from maize ( Zea mays L.) plants that were either well watered or water stressed, and the patch-clamp technique was used to investigate their plasma membrane K + channel activity. In the root cortex water stress did not significantly affect inward- or outward-rectifying K + conductances relative to those observed in well-watered plants. In contrast, water stress significantly reduced the magnitude of the outward-rectifying K + current in the root stele but had little effect on the inward-rectifying K + current. Pretreating well-watered plants with abscisic acid also significantly affected K + currents in a way that was consistent with abscisic acid mediating, at least in part, the response of roots to water stress. It is proposed that the K + channels underlying the K + currents in the root stelar cells represent pathways that allow K + exchange between the root symplasm and xylem apoplast. It is suggested that the regulation of K + channel activity in the root in response to water stress could be part of an important adaptation of the plant to survive drying soils. Abbreviations: pS picosiemens TD time-dependent http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Regulation of K+ Channels in Maize Roots by Water Stress and Abscisic Acid

Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologist
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN
1532-2548
eISSN
0032-0889
D.O.I.
10.1104/pp.116.1.145
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Root cortical and stelar protoplasts were isolated from maize ( Zea mays L.) plants that were either well watered or water stressed, and the patch-clamp technique was used to investigate their plasma membrane K + channel activity. In the root cortex water stress did not significantly affect inward- or outward-rectifying K + conductances relative to those observed in well-watered plants. In contrast, water stress significantly reduced the magnitude of the outward-rectifying K + current in the root stele but had little effect on the inward-rectifying K + current. Pretreating well-watered plants with abscisic acid also significantly affected K + currents in a way that was consistent with abscisic acid mediating, at least in part, the response of roots to water stress. It is proposed that the K + channels underlying the K + currents in the root stelar cells represent pathways that allow K + exchange between the root symplasm and xylem apoplast. It is suggested that the regulation of K + channel activity in the root in response to water stress could be part of an important adaptation of the plant to survive drying soils. Abbreviations: pS picosiemens TD time-dependent

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