Redox Homeostasis and Antioxidant Signaling: A Metabolic Interface between Stress Perception and Physiological Responses

Redox Homeostasis and Antioxidant Signaling: A Metabolic Interface between Stress Perception and... Redox Homeostasis and Antioxidant Signaling: A Metabolic Interface between Stress Perception and Physiological Responses var callbackToken='473CB074355C48A'; google_ad_client = "pub-9952929556064480"; google_ad_width = 120; google_ad_height = 600; google_ad_format = "120x600_as"; google_ad_channel = "1561583889"; google_color_border = "336699"; google_color_bg = "FFFFFF"; google_color_link = "0000FF"; google_color_url = "008000"; google_color_text = "000000"; Skip to main page content HOME ABOUT SUBMIT SUBSCRIPTIONS ADVERTISE ARCHIVE CONTACT US Keywords GO Advanced » Institution: DeepDyve Crawler User Name Password Sign In The Plant Cell 17:1866-1875 (2005) © 2005 American Society of Plant Biologists PERSPECTIVE <h2>Redox Homeostasis and Antioxidant Signaling: A Metabolic Interface between Stress Perception and Physiological Responses</h2> Christine H. Foyer Crop Performance and Improvement Division, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK Graham Noctor Institut de Biotechnologie des Plantes, Unité Mixte de Recherche Centre, National de la Recherche, Scientifique 8618, Université de Paris XI, 91405 Orsay cedex, France christine.foyer@bbsrc.ac.uk noctor@ibp.u-psud.fr Low molecular weight antioxidants, such as ascorbate, glutathione, and tocopherol, are information-rich redox buffers that interact with numerous cellular components. In addition to crucial roles in defense and as enzyme cofactors, cellular antioxidants influence plant growth and development by modulating processes from mitosis and cell elongation to senescence and death (De Pinto and De Gara, 2004 ; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Redox Homeostasis and Antioxidant Signaling: A Metabolic Interface between Stress Perception and Physiological Responses

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Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologist
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN
1040-4651
eISSN
1532-298X
D.O.I.
10.1105/tpc.105.033589
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Redox Homeostasis and Antioxidant Signaling: A Metabolic Interface between Stress Perception and Physiological Responses var callbackToken='473CB074355C48A'; google_ad_client = "pub-9952929556064480"; google_ad_width = 120; google_ad_height = 600; google_ad_format = "120x600_as"; google_ad_channel = "1561583889"; google_color_border = "336699"; google_color_bg = "FFFFFF"; google_color_link = "0000FF"; google_color_url = "008000"; google_color_text = "000000"; Skip to main page content HOME ABOUT SUBMIT SUBSCRIPTIONS ADVERTISE ARCHIVE CONTACT US Keywords GO Advanced » Institution: DeepDyve Crawler User Name Password Sign In The Plant Cell 17:1866-1875 (2005) © 2005 American Society of Plant Biologists PERSPECTIVE <h2>Redox Homeostasis and Antioxidant Signaling: A Metabolic Interface between Stress Perception and Physiological Responses</h2> Christine H. Foyer Crop Performance and Improvement Division, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK Graham Noctor Institut de Biotechnologie des Plantes, Unité Mixte de Recherche Centre, National de la Recherche, Scientifique 8618, Université de Paris XI, 91405 Orsay cedex, France christine.foyer@bbsrc.ac.uk noctor@ibp.u-psud.fr Low molecular weight antioxidants, such as ascorbate, glutathione, and tocopherol, are information-rich redox buffers that interact with numerous cellular components. In addition to crucial roles in defense and as enzyme cofactors, cellular antioxidants influence plant growth and development by modulating processes from mitosis and cell elongation to senescence and death (De Pinto and De Gara, 2004 ;

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