Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

Programmed Cell Death in Plants. INTRODUCTION (PCD) is a physiological cell death process involved in the selective elimination of unwanted cells (Ellis et al., 1991). In animals, these unwanted cells include those that have served temporary functions, such as tadpole tail cells at metamorphosis; cells that are overproduced, such as vertebrate neurons; cells that are unwanted or present in inappropriate positions, such as cells between the developing digits and Müllerian duct cells required in females but not males; and cells that die during the process of cell specialization, such as keratinocytes at the surface of the skin (Jacobsen et al., 1997). PCD in specific cell types can also give rise to disease. These cell types include helper T cells, which undergo PCD in AIDS, and selected brain neurons, which die during Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Lou Gehrig’s disease (Duke et al., 1996). Thus, PCD plays an important role in cell and tissue homeostasis and specialization, tissue sculpting, and disease. PCD in Caenorhabditis elegans and other animals depends on the induction and action of specific genes that bring about the controlled disassembly of a cell (Wadewitz and Lockshin, 1988; Ellis et al., 1991). This disassembly involves the condensation, shrinkage, and fragmentation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

Jul 19, 1997

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-society-of-plant-biologist/programmed-cell-death-in-plants-j9Vpw027Ez
Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologist
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by the American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN
1040-4651
eISSN
1532-298X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION (PCD) is a physiological cell death process involved in the selective elimination of unwanted cells (Ellis et al., 1991). In animals, these unwanted cells include those that have served temporary functions, such as tadpole tail cells at metamorphosis; cells that are overproduced, such as vertebrate neurons; cells that are unwanted or present in inappropriate positions, such as cells between the developing digits and Müllerian duct cells required in females but not males; and cells that die during the process of cell specialization, such as keratinocytes at the surface of the skin (Jacobsen et al., 1997). PCD in specific cell types can also give rise to disease. These cell types include helper T cells, which undergo PCD in AIDS, and selected brain neurons, which die during Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Lou Gehrig’s disease (Duke et al., 1996). Thus, PCD plays an important role in cell and tissue homeostasis and specialization, tissue sculpting, and disease. PCD in Caenorhabditis elegans and other animals depends on the induction and action of specific genes that bring about the controlled disassembly of a cell (Wadewitz and Lockshin, 1988; Ellis et al., 1991). This disassembly involves the condensation, shrinkage, and fragmentation

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off