Leaf Conductance as a Function of Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density and Absolute Humidity Difference from Leaf to Air

Leaf Conductance as a Function of Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density and Absolute Humidity... For an entire season of stomatal activity, leaf or needle conductance was observed on four species, each in a different genus: Engelmann spruce ( Picea engelmannii Parry ex Engelm.), subalpine fir ( Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.), lodgepole pine ( Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm.), and aspen ( Populus tremuloides Michx.). Conductance in the natural environment was described for all species by photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and absolute humidity difference from leaf to air (DAH), as follows: Conductance = b 1 (√PPFD/√DAH) + b 2 (√PPFD/DAH) + b 3 (√PPFD/DAH 2 ). The only data not fitting this relationship were conifer data collected after freezing nights or aspen data collected during a short period in August when water stress occurred. In both cases, leaf conductance was reduced. It is proposed that PPFD and DAH are primary factors controlling stomatal function for plants growing in their native range; secondary factors, such as temperature and water stress, affect conductance intermittently, except when plants are growing outside their normal environmental conditions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Leaf Conductance as a Function of Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density and Absolute Humidity Difference from Leaf to Air

May 1, 1982

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-society-of-plant-biologist/leaf-conductance-as-a-function-of-photosynthetic-photon-flux-density-0JEXN0W5Wo
Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologist
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 by the American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN
1532-2548
eISSN
0032-0889
D.O.I.
10.1104/pp.69.5.1018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

For an entire season of stomatal activity, leaf or needle conductance was observed on four species, each in a different genus: Engelmann spruce ( Picea engelmannii Parry ex Engelm.), subalpine fir ( Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.), lodgepole pine ( Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm.), and aspen ( Populus tremuloides Michx.). Conductance in the natural environment was described for all species by photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and absolute humidity difference from leaf to air (DAH), as follows: Conductance = b 1 (√PPFD/√DAH) + b 2 (√PPFD/DAH) + b 3 (√PPFD/DAH 2 ). The only data not fitting this relationship were conifer data collected after freezing nights or aspen data collected during a short period in August when water stress occurred. In both cases, leaf conductance was reduced. It is proposed that PPFD and DAH are primary factors controlling stomatal function for plants growing in their native range; secondary factors, such as temperature and water stress, affect conductance intermittently, except when plants are growing outside their normal environmental conditions.

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off