Introgression of Novel Traits from a Wild Wheat Relative Improves Drought Adaptation in Wheat

Introgression of Novel Traits from a Wild Wheat Relative Improves Drought Adaptation in Wheat Root architecture traits are an important component for improving water stress adaptation. However, selection for aboveground traits under favorable environments in modern cultivars may have led to an inadvertent loss of genes and novel alleles beneficial for adapting to environments with limited water. In this study, we elucidate the physiological and molecular consequences of introgressing an alien chromosome segment (7DL) from a wild wheat relative species ( Agropyron elongatum ) into cultivated wheat ( Triticum aestivum ). The wheat translocation line had improved water stress adaptation and higher root and shoot biomass compared with the control genotypes, which showed significant drops in root and shoot biomass during stress. Enhanced access to water due to higher root biomass enabled the translocation line to maintain more favorable gas-exchange and carbon assimilation levels relative to the wild-type wheat genotypes during water stress. Transcriptome analysis identified candidate genes associated with root development. Two of these candidate genes mapped to the site of translocation on chromosome 7DL based on single-feature polymorphism analysis. A brassinosteroid signaling pathway was predicted to be involved in the novel root responses observed in the A. elongatum translocation line, based on the coexpression-based gene network generated by seeding the network with the candidate genes. We present an effective and highly integrated approach that combines root phenotyping, whole-plant physiology, and functional genomics to discover novel root traits and the underlying genes from a wild related species to improve drought adaptation in cultivated wheat. Glossary P76 Pavon76 TL 1-96-1 translocation line NC negative control F v ′/ F m ′ maximum quantum efficiency of open PSII reaction centers RuBP ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate V cmax maximum rate of carboxylation by Rubisco J max ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration rate qRT-PCR quantitative PCR BR brassinosteroid SFP single-feature polymorphism C i intercellular CO 2 qRT quantitative reverse transcription cDNA complementary DNA http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Introgression of Novel Traits from a Wild Wheat Relative Improves Drought Adaptation in Wheat

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Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologist
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN
1532-2548
eISSN
0032-0889
D.O.I.
10.1104/pp.113.214262
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Root architecture traits are an important component for improving water stress adaptation. However, selection for aboveground traits under favorable environments in modern cultivars may have led to an inadvertent loss of genes and novel alleles beneficial for adapting to environments with limited water. In this study, we elucidate the physiological and molecular consequences of introgressing an alien chromosome segment (7DL) from a wild wheat relative species ( Agropyron elongatum ) into cultivated wheat ( Triticum aestivum ). The wheat translocation line had improved water stress adaptation and higher root and shoot biomass compared with the control genotypes, which showed significant drops in root and shoot biomass during stress. Enhanced access to water due to higher root biomass enabled the translocation line to maintain more favorable gas-exchange and carbon assimilation levels relative to the wild-type wheat genotypes during water stress. Transcriptome analysis identified candidate genes associated with root development. Two of these candidate genes mapped to the site of translocation on chromosome 7DL based on single-feature polymorphism analysis. A brassinosteroid signaling pathway was predicted to be involved in the novel root responses observed in the A. elongatum translocation line, based on the coexpression-based gene network generated by seeding the network with the candidate genes. We present an effective and highly integrated approach that combines root phenotyping, whole-plant physiology, and functional genomics to discover novel root traits and the underlying genes from a wild related species to improve drought adaptation in cultivated wheat. Glossary P76 Pavon76 TL 1-96-1 translocation line NC negative control F v ′/ F m ′ maximum quantum efficiency of open PSII reaction centers RuBP ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate V cmax maximum rate of carboxylation by Rubisco J max ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration rate qRT-PCR quantitative PCR BR brassinosteroid SFP single-feature polymorphism C i intercellular CO 2 qRT quantitative reverse transcription cDNA complementary DNA

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