Genetic analysis of osmotic and cold stress signal transduction in Arabidopsis: interactions and convergence of abscisic acid-dependent and abscisic acid-independent pathways.

Genetic analysis of osmotic and cold stress signal transduction in Arabidopsis: interactions and... To dissect genetically the complex network of osmotic and cold stress signaling, we constructed lines of Arabidopsis plants displaying bioluminescence in response to low temperature, drought, salinity, and the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). This was achieved by introducing into Arabidopsis plants a chimeric gene construct consisting of the firefly luciferase coding sequence (LUC) under the control of the stress-responsive RD29A promoter. LUC activity in the transgenic plants, as assessed by using in vivo luminescence imaging, faithfully reports the expression of the endogenous RD29A gene. A large number of cos (for constitutive expression of osmotically responsive genes), los (for low expression of osmotically responsive genes), and hos (for high expression of osmotically responsive genes) mutants were identified by using a high-throughput luminescence imaging system. The los and hos mutants were grouped into 14 classes according to defects in their responses to one or a combination of stress and ABA signals. Based on the classes of mutants recovered, we propose a model for stress signaling in higher plants. Contrary to the current belief that ABA-dependent and ABA-independent stress signaling pathways act in a parallel manner, our data reveal that these pathways cross-talk and converge to activate stress gene expression. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Genetic analysis of osmotic and cold stress signal transduction in Arabidopsis: interactions and convergence of abscisic acid-dependent and abscisic acid-independent pathways.

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Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologist
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by the American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN
1040-4651
eISSN
1532-298X
D.O.I.
10.1105/tpc.9.11.1935
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To dissect genetically the complex network of osmotic and cold stress signaling, we constructed lines of Arabidopsis plants displaying bioluminescence in response to low temperature, drought, salinity, and the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). This was achieved by introducing into Arabidopsis plants a chimeric gene construct consisting of the firefly luciferase coding sequence (LUC) under the control of the stress-responsive RD29A promoter. LUC activity in the transgenic plants, as assessed by using in vivo luminescence imaging, faithfully reports the expression of the endogenous RD29A gene. A large number of cos (for constitutive expression of osmotically responsive genes), los (for low expression of osmotically responsive genes), and hos (for high expression of osmotically responsive genes) mutants were identified by using a high-throughput luminescence imaging system. The los and hos mutants were grouped into 14 classes according to defects in their responses to one or a combination of stress and ABA signals. Based on the classes of mutants recovered, we propose a model for stress signaling in higher plants. Contrary to the current belief that ABA-dependent and ABA-independent stress signaling pathways act in a parallel manner, our data reveal that these pathways cross-talk and converge to activate stress gene expression.

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