Exploiting the triple response of Arabidopsis to identify ethylene-related mutants.

Exploiting the triple response of Arabidopsis to identify ethylene-related mutants. Alterations in the response of dark-grown seedlings to ethylene (the "triple response") were used to isolate a collection of ethylene-related mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutants displaying a constitutive response (eto1) were found to produce at least 40 times more ethylene than the wild type. The morphological defects in etiolated eto1-1 seedlings reverted to wild type under conditions in which ethylene biosynthesis or ethylene action were inhibited. Mutants that failed to display the apical hook in the absence of ethylene (his1) exhibited reduced ethylene production. In the presence of exogenous ethylene, hypocotyl and root of etiolated his1-1 seedlings were inhibited in elongation but no apical hook was observed. Mutants that were insensitive to ethylene (ein1 and ein2) produced increased amounts of ethylene, displayed hormone insensitivity in both hypocotyl and root responses, and showed an apical hook. Each of the "triple response" mutants has an effect on the shape of the seedling and on the production of the hormone. These mutants should prove to be useful tools for dissecting the mode of ethylene action in plants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Exploiting the triple response of Arabidopsis to identify ethylene-related mutants.

Jun 1, 1990

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-society-of-plant-biologist/exploiting-the-triple-response-of-arabidopsis-to-identify-ethylene-WQK2fESQII
Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologist
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 by the American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN
1040-4651
eISSN
1532-298X
D.O.I.
10.1105/tpc.2.6.513
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Alterations in the response of dark-grown seedlings to ethylene (the "triple response") were used to isolate a collection of ethylene-related mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutants displaying a constitutive response (eto1) were found to produce at least 40 times more ethylene than the wild type. The morphological defects in etiolated eto1-1 seedlings reverted to wild type under conditions in which ethylene biosynthesis or ethylene action were inhibited. Mutants that failed to display the apical hook in the absence of ethylene (his1) exhibited reduced ethylene production. In the presence of exogenous ethylene, hypocotyl and root of etiolated his1-1 seedlings were inhibited in elongation but no apical hook was observed. Mutants that were insensitive to ethylene (ein1 and ein2) produced increased amounts of ethylene, displayed hormone insensitivity in both hypocotyl and root responses, and showed an apical hook. Each of the "triple response" mutants has an effect on the shape of the seedling and on the production of the hormone. These mutants should prove to be useful tools for dissecting the mode of ethylene action in plants.

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off